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Asking for raise vs. asking to match competing offer

Hi All, I have been advising in house at a mid-to-large s chambers01/05/17
"Are there risks associated" Um, are there risks associat inho2solo01/05/17
It depends....on the issue of loyalty with your team. Oft sanka01/05/17
Have you research to find out if your current compensation i beat12301/05/17
I would not present an offer elsewhere under any circumstanc dingbat01/05/17
Thanks for your help. If the die is cast by the time the ann chambers01/05/17
Again, you've said you're at a good sized corp. I'd be pret inho2solo01/05/17
Even if you were buddies with the boss, this is extremely ri sfgiantsfan01/11/17
No one likes to negotiate with a gun to their head. I would notiers01/11/17
No one likes to negotiate with a gun to their head. I would notiers01/11/17
Ask for a raise. If they say "no" than let them know you hav isthisit01/11/17
Getting canned just for asking?! Now you go on and be an obe mtbislife01/11/17
just to speak on isthisit's behalf, you can definitely get c dingbat01/11/17
Not saying you two are wrong, just a messed up system we hav mtbislife01/11/17
He probably knew too and just trolled 'em. I wouldn't adv triplesix01/11/17
no, he was that clueless. He was completely incompetent, an dingbat01/11/17
Way to miss the point haha. Why do you care? Do you own the triplesix01/11/17
his poor performance affected me in two ways -> he was a pip dingbat01/11/17
haha mtbislife01/11/17
chambers (Jan 5, 2017 - 1:18 am)

Hi All,

I have been advising in house at a mid-to-large sized company for about a year and a half. I think my bosses are happy with my work and I feel like I'm approaching my first real window to re-negotiate my base salary. As that prospect nears, though, I find myself wondering how best to prompt that. I haven't raised the question of my salary yet with my superiors. I think the natural moment to do so would be after our annual performance reviews which occur in Q1. I was also thinking about interviewing at other companies for opportunities so that I might have actual leverage, even though I'm quite happy with my work now.

Are there risks associated with presenting another job offer to your employer and asking them to match? Would it be better to just address this head on, or in the context of a performance review? Do any of you have experience with this?

Any advice would be appreciated.

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inho2solo (Jan 5, 2017 - 1:41 am)

"Are there risks associated"

Um, are there risks associated with printing an indelible bulls-eye target on your back?

Seriously, you'll have to gauge the temperament of your superiors, but generally threatening to leave and asking for a match otherwise is not a good career enhancement strategy.

Just my 2 cents, but in your shoes I'd just meet it head on in your perf eval. You say you're in a mid-to-large corp. In most cases, the average raise percentage is pre-set and there's not a whole lot can be done about that. There are bands around the average for people who perform above and below average. So, say the average corporate merit increase has been set at 2.5%. If you perform somewhat better, they may be able to give you 3%. If you perform a lot better than average, they may be able to give you 3.5-4%.

But here's the kicker with MANY corporate merit raise schemes. The budget allotted to any given manager pretends that everyone is median. So his budget is 2.5% (if that's the average allotted this year) times the average salary.

This means that in order to give anyone more than that average 2.5% raise, someone else must get less than that average 2.5% raise.

In a department with all good workers, then, the boss finds himself pretty much hosed. So if he has someone he believes really merits an above-average raise, he submits upward a merit raise budget which is in excess of what he had allotted to his dept, and hopes his boss permits it to go through.

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sanka (Jan 5, 2017 - 5:40 am)

It depends....on the issue of loyalty with your team.

Often loyalty seems a one way street.

In this market, you'really expendable.

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beat123 (Jan 5, 2017 - 7:52 am)

Have you research to find out if your current compensation is line with the market?

I feel like you to have buy in from your manager to get a raise. When you have your compensation meeting with your manager, your increase has been decided and the meeting is just a formality.

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dingbat (Jan 5, 2017 - 11:26 am)

I would not present an offer elsewhere under any circumstances. There are only 3 possible outcomes:

1) they tell you to leave, or they say no and you leave. Lucky you that you have an offer in hand.
2) they say no and you stay. You're forever after marked as a p*ssy and you'll never get a fair raise again
3) they say yes and you stay. But, now they know you're looking around and could jump ship at a moment's notice. So they look for and train a replacement. They stop giving you the cushy assignments. They skip you over for promotions. And when it's convenient for them, they shove you out the door. What are the odds that you will have an offer in-hand when the time comes?

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chambers (Jan 5, 2017 - 12:17 pm)

Thanks for your help. If the die is cast by the time the annual review hits is there a better way to handle this outside of the process?

I would like to think I can't be easily replaced although it seems that's the type of thing you can delude yourself about. Through working my tail off I've insourced some processes that will save around .5M per year in outside counsel expenditures. I get the feeling my pay is below market for comparable opportunities.

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inho2solo (Jan 5, 2017 - 2:45 pm)

Again, you've said you're at a good sized corp. I'd be pretty surprised if they don't have salary benchmarking from peer corps for all positions.

There is a thing called "compensation ratio" or sometimes just "compa" (pronounced as "comp-aay") ratio. This is the ratio of your pay to that industry benchmark. See if you can find out what your compa ratio is.

Most corps view someone under 80% compa as unsuitably below target, unless very new to the job. They may have a process in place permitting mid-cycle administrative adjustments where a person can get a raise outside the normal cycle to bring them up to at least 80% compa ratio.

If you're already over 80% of target, then arguing for an admin increase becomes tougher for someone like you who is only 18 mos into the job, but you still might have reason to argue equity/value brought.

Does your company have a ladder for lawyers? That is, is there something like attorney-1, senior attorney, counsel, senior counsel, deputy GC? Or is it very flat with just lawyers and, otherwise, the GC?

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sfgiantsfan (Jan 11, 2017 - 8:16 am)

Even if you were buddies with the boss, this is extremely risky and he could simply call your bluff. In normal work dynamics, as it's been said, you might as well paint a bullseye on the back of your skull.

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notiers (Jan 11, 2017 - 12:04 pm)

No one likes to negotiate with a gun to their head. I would advise against trying to have your employer bid against you. Soliciting bids for the purposes of negotiating your salary is sort of bad-form.

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notiers (Jan 11, 2017 - 12:04 pm)

No one likes to negotiate with a gun to their head. I would advise against trying to have your employer bid against you. Soliciting bids for the purposes of negotiating your salary is sort of bad-form.

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isthisit (Jan 11, 2017 - 12:28 pm)

Ask for a raise. If they say "no" than let them know you have an offer elsewhere but you want to stay with them and if they can match or come close. If no again or you get canned than take the other offer. Regardless, you may get canned for just asking for a raise but life is all about risk.

Be loyal to the opportunity not the place. The company definitely doesn't feel any sense of loyalty to you.

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mtbislife (Jan 11, 2017 - 1:02 pm)

Getting canned just for asking?! Now you go on and be an obedient drone, how dare you ask for more money!

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dingbat (Jan 11, 2017 - 1:13 pm)

just to speak on isthisit's behalf, you can definitely get canned for demanding more money - which is pretty much what you're doing when you're showing a competing offer.

You're unlikely to get canned simply for politely asking for a raise - unless they were looking to get rid of you already (as happened to a former colleague of mine; I knew he was going to get fired weeks before he did, a replacement was being trained. Then he had the audacity to ask for a significant raise)

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mtbislife (Jan 11, 2017 - 1:22 pm)

Not saying you two are wrong, just a messed up system we have created.

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triplesix (Jan 11, 2017 - 1:23 pm)

He probably knew too and just trolled 'em.

I wouldn't advise this tactic unless you are already getting fired. If you are, have fun with it.

Note the perspetive you are writing from, as if he did something wrong. This is the main issue with today's labour market. Every prole is pulling for the wrong team, a little worker solidarity would go a long way. Statistically speakingpst people will experience what happened to your coworker, no need to be smug about it.

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dingbat (Jan 11, 2017 - 1:55 pm)

no, he was that clueless.
He was completely incompetent, and probably lost us a lot of business, yet somehow thought he was doing a good job.

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triplesix (Jan 11, 2017 - 2:10 pm)

Way to miss the point haha. Why do you care? Do you own the company, did his allegedly poor work affect your performance?

He got y'all all worked up pretty well over him asking for fat cash. He did well in my book.

Keep on office droning, yolo.

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dingbat (Jan 11, 2017 - 2:23 pm)

his poor performance affected me in two ways -> he was a pipeline, handling the intake for work that I did, which meant when he screwed up, I had less work. His failures also affected the bottom line which in turn affected my bonus.

Worker solidarity is all well and good when management is taking advantage (and I have worked at sh*thole places like that), but I have very little tolerance for incompetence

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mtbislife (Jan 11, 2017 - 3:26 pm)

haha

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