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Law school employment numbers and "free-riders"

The employment number will not be out for several months, bu jdcumlaude01/07/17
I'd say 30-33 percent. Free riders are only ones who have th mtobeinf01/08/17
The majority of jobs are this way. To get a good sense of t cargo01/08/17
If JAG factors in, then all OCI factors in, it is almost the trollfeeder01/08/17
Some people who are already in the military come to law scho skepticmadenotborn01/08/17
Agreed. However, in my view the law schools themselves are jdcumlaude01/08/17
I know of only two (in a class of 80?). One I'm sure had qdllc01/09/17
jdcumlaude (Jan 7, 2017 - 11:28 pm)

The employment number will not be out for several months, but I still wanted the opinions of others on this matter.

Every year law schools around the country try to highlight, disavow, praise or downplay their employment statistics. However, every school has one thing in common. They all are free-riders to some extent.

Specifically, I am referring to those students whose employment was guaranteed prior to law school. This includes those graduates who pass the bar and have jobs that have been waiting for them even prior to law school (or the LSAT for that matter). Family jobs, taking over dad's practice, working for your uncle....the classics. I suppose JAG would factor into this number as well.

If you were to ballpark the number, what percentage of your graduating class had jobs waiting for them. Which I believe will also answer to what extent are law schools free-riders on their own employment numbers.

I think my class would be in the 5-10% range leaning more toward the high number (a bit higher if you included JAG).

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mtobeinf (Jan 8, 2017 - 9:26 am)

I'd say 30-33 percent. Free riders are only ones who have the chance to get the jobs unless they have law review or a resume like mine. Worked my ass off still struggled initially.

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cargo (Jan 8, 2017 - 12:16 am)

The majority of jobs are this way. To get a good sense of the numbers, we would need to have data on the % of graduates at a school who have parents who are neither Upper Middle Class (culturally) nor affluent (economically).

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trollfeeder (Jan 8, 2017 - 9:03 am)

If JAG factors in, then all OCI factors in, it is almost the same exact process. JAG typically recruits 2 and 3L's, it isn't something you line up before school.

I understand your point, but I think if I was to do it again, I would follow the jdu advice of working as a para somewhere first, getting some connections pre law school.

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skepticmadenotborn (Jan 8, 2017 - 12:18 pm)

Some people who are already in the military come to law school with a JAG slot waiting for them when they graduate.

Speaking more broadly, these pre-law school guaranteed jobs seem rare at my school. No more than 3-4% of the class, maybe less. Some people have parents who are lawyers and don't want to work with them.

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jdcumlaude (Jan 8, 2017 - 1:42 pm)

Agreed. However, in my view the law schools themselves are free-riders. The students you described, who have jobs waiting for them (even if they do not want to work with family), tend to inflate employment numbers of individual schools.

I wish the ABA would collect this data, but in reality it really is not that hard to find through research. Find the grads from your class that have matching last names...this would take a long time especially for larger schools, but I think it would be worth while.

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qdllc (Jan 9, 2017 - 7:42 am)

I know of only two (in a class of 80?).

One I'm sure had something because he had a brand new BMW in the parking lot near end of graduation (daddy was a lawyer). The other had a daddy connected enough to ensure he'd get in. Got him a clerkship with a federal judge which led to a job with the federal prosecutor's office.

There was also Asian woman who had a job locked in before graduation. While she was smart, I don't doubt the two "minority" categories helped too.

Everyone else was hoping to land a job.

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