Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Exits for Insurance Defense Litigator?

I have been doing insurance defense litigation with a "mid l here2lurk01/08/17
My advice is to go transition now. Many large companies hav whitegoodman01/08/17
I'm in the same position. Five years in and can't take it an jj1001/10/17
I went from ID to a government position in a city law depart e36m301/08/17
What was your salary cut, if any? In my jurisdiction, I woul shikes01/08/17
You nailed it. $25k salary cut to join the city and no bonu e36m301/09/17
My reply a year ago would have been: Worker's Comp, Plaintif shikes01/08/17
My exit option was Chief Compliance Officer, BSA/AML Complia mtobeinf01/09/17
"My reply a year ago would have been: Worker's Comp, Plainti prestiiigiousone01/09/17
Completely agree. They all have their ups and downs. I did b shikes01/09/17
I know a bunch of plaintiffs personal injury attorneys. Thei e36m301/09/17
here2lurk (Jan 8, 2017 - 9:54 am)

I have been doing insurance defense litigation with a "mid law" firm for about 5 years now. For various reasons, I have grown weary of the work, and I want to explore opportunities outside of law firms. My thoughts are try to move in-house or go to work for an insurance company in a claims analyst-type capacity. I'm wondering if anyone has made the transition from insurance defense litigator to something else. Do you have any tips and pointers for possible exit options? Thanks in advance.

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whitegoodman (Jan 8, 2017 - 10:13 am)

My advice is to go transition now. Many large companies have claims counsel positions. You want to be in a position to move up the corporate ladder and into management positions by the mid 30s. There are two types of claims counsel, those who seek it out and tend to enjoy it, and those who feel forced into it. Also, your old bosses will be kissing your ass for work if they're on your panel, so that's a perk.

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jj10 (Jan 10, 2017 - 2:02 pm)

I'm in the same position. Five years in and can't take it anymore. I'd like to transition to a transactional or commercial law positin. ID attorneys are a dime a dozen.

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e36m3 (Jan 8, 2017 - 10:29 am)

I went from ID to a government position in a city law department. I was at the ID firm for 2 years and hated every second.

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shikes (Jan 8, 2017 - 12:13 pm)

What was your salary cut, if any? In my jurisdiction, I would have to take a ~25k salary cut to become a city solicitor, with smaller bonuses (if any) and smaller salary bumps. I don't even work at a large ID firm either. Can't imagine doing that jump from some of the larger ID firms we have.

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e36m3 (Jan 9, 2017 - 9:36 am)

You nailed it. $25k salary cut to join the city and no bonuses.

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shikes (Jan 8, 2017 - 12:08 pm)

My reply a year ago would have been: Worker's Comp, Plaintiff's Personal Injury, DA/PD, Staff counsel for Insurance company.

My reply today: All of the above, but basically anything else depending on need. I work in ID, and we had people lateral to employment law positions, in house for cellphone companies, AUSA, AG's, biglaw, compliance, etc..

The more I'm in law the more I see that while the pigeonhole thing is true to some extent, there are always exceptions, especially if you're less than ~7 years out. ID > In House at a large company has almost no transferrable skills, but hell they took a friend of mine based on need, him spinning some skills and liking him at the interview. It happens, I just wouldn't depend on it.

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mtobeinf (Jan 9, 2017 - 9:40 am)

My exit option was Chief Compliance Officer, BSA/AML Compliance Officer, and Assistant Vice President for 12 billion Trust Co. Worked out pretty damn well I must say.

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prestiiigiousone (Jan 9, 2017 - 5:51 pm)

"My reply a year ago would have been: Worker's Comp, Plaintiff's Personal Injury, DA/PD, Staff counsel for Insurance company."

None of those are really any better than ID, except for DA/PD, which isn't really better or worse, just much different.

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shikes (Jan 9, 2017 - 6:22 pm)

Completely agree. They all have their ups and downs. I did both PD and DA work before going to ID and I enjoyed the former more, but enjoy the paycheck from the latter more.

I would actually love to hear perspective from plaintiffs personal injury attorneys on their most difficult issues at work. I can name dozens in ID but never worked plaintiff or knew anyone that did so can't comment on if better or worse. The giant paydays that = x3 my salary on one case seem nice, though obviously rare.

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e36m3 (Jan 9, 2017 - 7:00 pm)

I know a bunch of plaintiffs personal injury attorneys. Their most difficult issues are dealing with unreasonable plaintiffs, and staying on top of their calendar in high volume practices. I've never met a person who has done both ID and plaintiffs PI that didn't prefer plaintiffs work. The obvious plus side to Plaintiffs work is most shops give you a piece of every case you work on and you don't have to bill or take orders from insurance adjusters.

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