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NY Supreme Court motion question - blue backs? Help (adamb or others)

So this is in the supreme court, criminal division, I need t wolfman01/10/17
Also, I didn't go to LS in NY and am not admitted here, and wolfman01/10/17
When I practiced criminal law in ny, I did have the time or trollfeeder01/10/17
Thanks, it does. wolfman01/10/17
Send me a throwaway email, I will send you an example of wha prodigy01/10/17
carlwolfmann@gmail.com thanks in advance! wolfman01/10/17
Just buy legal sized blue paper, create your own blueback th adamb01/16/17
Agree with adamb - except, of course, in the commercial divi notiers01/16/17
Thanks all. It's funny how something like this seems crazy/d wolfman01/18/17
wolfman (Jan 10, 2017 - 10:23 am)

So this is in the supreme court, criminal division, I need to file a notice of motion, affirmation and proposed order - I understand what blue backs are, and am told they are not required by law but we have to do them anyway...

BUT does EVERYTHING get a back (copies file with the court and copies served on other parties)??? Just the stuff to the court? And what the heck are white backs?

Also, dumb question but since those things are basically tabs for clerks - should the text go in the same direction as the motion (only on back)? Or sideways? Does anyone care?

And don't tell me to talk to the paralegal - I am the paralegal...

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wolfman (Jan 10, 2017 - 10:28 am)

Also, I didn't go to LS in NY and am not admitted here, and already did a web search... any help is appreciated

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trollfeeder (Jan 10, 2017 - 11:00 am)

When I practiced criminal law in ny, I did have the time or resources for backers, and they were stamped just the same as if they did. I believe the common practice is that the affirmation is a yellow backer, and only the proposed order is blue backer. Perhaps this only applies to civil, if so disregard. My backers have left to right writing. Hope that helps.

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wolfman (Jan 10, 2017 - 5:16 pm)

Thanks, it does.

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prodigy (Jan 10, 2017 - 11:57 am)

Send me a throwaway email, I will send you an example of what it looks like.

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wolfman (Jan 10, 2017 - 5:16 pm)

carlwolfmann@gmail.com

thanks in advance!

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adamb (Jan 16, 2017 - 8:40 am)

Just buy legal sized blue paper, create your own blueback that basically just has the name of the case on the back and what the thingy is your filing, and preferably the submission date. Some sign the blue back, I just sign the last page of my affirmation. Whatever. No one really cares, there is no standardized form as to what a blue back is. (I will be doing some other color back now, I think yellow or, if I run out, white or whatever I feel like. As I said, no one really cares.)

I print normal left to right, but some print "landscape" - again, it doesn't really matter.

FYI - no one in those courts read anything either. Even in Supreme Court Criminal Term, the court attorney sort of skims your motion if you're defense and issues a draft order denying relief. Motions are mainly to preserve issues for appeal.

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notiers (Jan 16, 2017 - 8:53 am)

Agree with adamb - except, of course, in the commercial division and a select few IAS judges throughout the court houses. I've always thought about a different color - but alas, my firm conforms and send out blue paper each time. I've seen Red, Pink, Light yellow, beige, green and even white - though I think white is disfavored.

Also note that if your case is to be E-filed, some courts require submission of hard copies with confirmation of the e-filing stapled to the back of the blue back. Also take note of whether the court you're in requires an in person appearance or if the papers (or courtesy copies of papers) can be dropped off beforehand to the motion support office. I've seen clerks reject or strike motions for failure to provide courtesy copies of efiled motions on the return date, etc.

Always look at: The CPLR, The Uniform Rules of the Trial Courts, the local rules for the Supreme Court County you are in, The Efiling Rules and the individual rules of the particular assigned judge or part (most of which is all available on line and not all that long or daunting to read).

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wolfman (Jan 18, 2017 - 12:09 am)

Thanks all. It's funny how something like this seems crazy/daunting the first time , and then not so much. Doing blue backs for copies and white backs for originals to file with the court (apparently preferred by our court service contractors) tomorrow, yay. Well, maybe not quite yay.

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