Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Anxiety

Anxiety is a real world infliction of attorneys that can be cocolawyer02/08/17
I agree that inflicting attorneys on people can cause suffic dingbat02/13/17
Yeah but I like to have a paycheck sooo... cocolawyer02/13/17
sorry, sarcasm doesn't always work on the net. The word you dingbat02/13/17
Alcohol. I also take melatonin during the week to sleep sjlawyer02/08/17
Seems healthy haha. cocolawyer02/08/17
CBD strains of marijuana ipesq02/08/17
another healthy solution haha. cocolawyer02/08/17
Way healthier than alcohol! employmentlawyer02/09/17
So far I have basically the solution is "I drink a lot" or " cocolawyer02/08/17
As a veteran of both methods and some more, none of them are triplesix02/08/17
Heroin. mtobeinf02/13/17
a serious meditation practice will reduce anxiety immensely. defensivelawyer02/08/17
Good question. In my formerly more relaxed firm environment warfrat02/08/17
I have yet to find a real solution to this problem. Like sj somemoarplease02/08/17
I think it is a bit of both. I couldn't find a good alternat cocolawyer02/08/17
I drink almost every night. So many deadlines with litigatio mnjd02/08/17
IMO the only real solutions are 1) getting a less stressful mtbislife02/08/17
Triplesix has some good points about building a financial cu fiftyplus02/08/17
I forgot one thing that does help on a practical basis. If fiftyplus02/08/17
That's actually great advice. I used to do the same with my cocolawyer02/08/17
Ha, I've actually cut down on my drinking for reasons that w sjlawyer02/08/17
Join the public sector. Litigation almost exploded my anxiet joshdoctson02/08/17
Depends on the public sector. Public defender, for example. lawst03/12/17
Regular strenuous exercise helps me a lot. flharfh02/08/17
I think anxiety levels can drop substantially the longer you anothernjlawyer02/08/17
What anothernNjlawyer said mississippilawyer02/08/17
Exercise and the ability to disconnect from your work. Mini jd4hire02/08/17
I'm in litigation and there is obviously constant stress, di shikes02/08/17
You make a lot of good points. I recognize myself in your re lawst03/12/17
Most attorneys cope with stress through substance abuse, wom trickydick02/08/17
I have a history of anxiety going back to my early childhood parlance02/09/17
I agree with what anothernjlawyer said. Also, coco, I pra guyingorillasuit02/09/17
Oh I agree with that. Unfortunately in my past practice I di cocolawyer02/09/17
How do these types of lawyers survive in the long run? I mea guyingorillasuit02/09/17
Hey GIGS, hope you are very well! I just had an experience kansas02/11/17
Well we didn't have ton's of clients, just a lot of high dol cocolawyer02/13/17
I have anxiety and the only solution for me was to get out o employmentlawyer02/09/17
Though it's been mentioned, exercise. Many studies have show thirdtierlaw02/09/17
Calisthenics. tcpaul02/09/17
Stress and anxiety is a reality in most ANY job. I think qdllc02/09/17
Shikes gives great advice. When I got rid of the Facebook ap cranky02/09/17
1) Adopt a strong internal IDGAF attitude towards work. The sillydood02/09/17
Totally agree, especially with #4. Typically people who make mtbislife02/09/17
I am married so regular sex is a LOL moment. I "had" long w cocolawyer02/09/17
Only one solution: leave the profession, but keep your law lifeofleisure02/13/17
Everyone says that but no one does it because no one knows w cocolawyer02/15/17
I watch tv/drink/work out every single moment I'm not at wor attorneyinct02/15/17
Has anyone tried working on your personal development, beyon entrepreneurlawyer02/23/17
No solution as of yet. Trial prep makes me physically ill. Y jorgedeclaro02/28/17
Going to the gym helps but it's the getting there part that attorneyinct03/01/17

cocolawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:11 pm)

Anxiety is a real world infliction of attorneys that can be debilitating. I don't think we talk about it enough, especially for litigation attorneys. What experiences have you guys had with Anxiety and have you found ways to cope (other then strong meds)?

Reply
dingbat (Feb 13, 2017 - 11:51 am)

I agree that inflicting attorneys on people can cause sufficient anxiety to be debilitating - especially when it's litigation attorneys.

The solution is less lawyers

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 13, 2017 - 1:19 pm)

Yeah but I like to have a paycheck sooo...

Reply
dingbat (Feb 13, 2017 - 9:34 pm)

sorry, sarcasm doesn't always work on the net.
The word you were looking for was affliction, not infliction

Anxiety is an affliction that can be debilitating
Inflicting lawyers on someone can cause anxiety

Reply
sjlawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:17 pm)

Alcohol.

I also take melatonin during the week to sleep.

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:26 pm)

Seems healthy haha.

Reply
ipesq (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:32 pm)

CBD strains of marijuana

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:34 pm)

another healthy solution haha.

Reply
employmentlawyer (Feb 9, 2017 - 4:30 am)

Way healthier than alcohol!

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:35 pm)

So far I have basically the solution is "I drink a lot" or "I smoke weed." Any non-medicated solutions.

Reply
triplesix (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:50 pm)

As a veteran of both methods and some more, none of them are real long term solutions, you will go crazy crazy from extended self medication. And prescription drugs are even worse from what I have seen.

I just adopted I don't give two fuks attitude now and adjusted my life to fit my mantra. Being middle aged neurotic womyn's or chubby dino's b1tch ain't worth any money.

I understand that most people can't just change their life on command but it is doable over couple of years if you don't blow all your cash balling. With a little cushion on da bank, you should be able to always just say fuk it peace. Once you have that attidue anxiety and mental issues go away. It is a job, other people's issues and ambitions ain't your existential crisis. If they push too hard, let them fight for themselves haha. Life is too short to worry about others for money.

Reply
mtobeinf (Feb 13, 2017 - 12:06 pm)

Heroin.

Reply
defensivelawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:44 pm)

a serious meditation practice will reduce anxiety immensely. however, it takes effort.

Reply
warfrat (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:52 pm)

Good question. In my formerly more relaxed firm environment this wasn't as a big of an issue for me as it is now. I feel like my future is hanging in the balance on almost every decision I make in my current environment and therefore extreme anxiety lately.

I don't have a solution. Got prescribed to xanax which is probably the best albeit temporary relief and I only get a few pills a month. Alcohol doesn't really help. My objective is to develop a zen-like mind trick whereby I walk out of the office door, my mind also blocks out all work related thoughts. If anyone has mastered that, please let me know.

Reply
somemoarplease (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:53 pm)

I have yet to find a real solution to this problem. Like sjlawyer, I also take melatonin since health issues prevent me from using alcohol to take the edge off and help me rest. Working out is effective but depending on your workload, it may not be possible to do it regularly. I work in ID and my anxiety stems mostly from not knowing what grenade is waiting to explode on any given file on any given day (e.g. paralegal never set up an IME as requested, Judge enters insane order to complete significant discovery in less than 30 days, new file transfers with discovery over and no depositions or IMEs completed, inability to bill for a day due to a non-billable emergency on a file, etc.). Some adjusters don't care where the problem comes from, and will throw you under the bus quickly. I have to say that some attorneys regardless of age are better suited to handle the stress, and I am impressed by them. I am really curious if people leave the field primarily due to the stress, or due to the nature of the work itself.

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:59 pm)

I think it is a bit of both. I couldn't find a good alternative to the law. I found a government gig escape hatch but I still am befuddled on what you could do alternatively then the law.

Reply
mnjd (Feb 8, 2017 - 12:58 pm)

I drink almost every night. So many deadlines with litigation. When you are in the PI field you are also not always dealing with the most sophisticated people. These people tend to never be satisfied and will accuse you of not informing them of important details. Constant fear of ethics complaints

90% of my clients are great, it's the other 10%. Hopefully, marijuana gets legalized here as I would at least like to try that. A nice indicas strain such as Granddaddy Purple oughta hit the spot.

Reply
mtbislife (Feb 8, 2017 - 1:08 pm)

IMO the only real solutions are 1) getting a less stressful job and 2) regular zen mediation, doing some curls or going to yoga twice a week will help a bit but nowhere near as much as true zazen. But beware, if you go through a stage of intense meditation it will likely cause you to question your entire existence and you will never look at life the same way again.

Reply
fiftyplus (Feb 8, 2017 - 1:36 pm)

Triplesix has some good points about building a financial cushion so you don't worry that if something blows you will be homeless. I've been practicing a long time and I don't worry about much anymore. I remind myself that 1) it's not brain surgery. At least in my practice area, no one will die if I make a mistake; 2) my family will still love me even I have to work at Wal-mart and 3)I do the very best I can at each case, I try hard to be diligent and I pay my malpractice premiums in case I make a big mistake. Drinking and pills will never quell the anxiety for good. The only way to do it is to do the best you can and leave the rest up to God (or dog, or the universe, or chance or whatever you ultimately believe in).

Reply
fiftyplus (Feb 8, 2017 - 1:38 pm)

I forgot one thing that does help on a practical basis. If I am at home and I feel like I'm worried about something, I force myself to sit down with a pen and paper and write out everything I am worried about. Even if it is that I forgot to pick up the dry cleaning. A total mind dump. That seems to organize the anxiety enough to let it go.

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 2:38 pm)

That's actually great advice. I used to do the same with my cases. Everything was calendared but I was always afraid I was missing something, so I would write down what needed to happen in each case to make sure I was on top of it. The reassurance relieved some anxiety.

The big bag of cash set aside really doesn't work for most of us. For most of us here we are within the first 10 years of practice, paying off massive loans, and have a family to support. It's not to realistic that we will be able to stuff away 100k in savings (while contributing to a 401k, IRA, Thrift Savings etc).

Reply
sjlawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 2:43 pm)

Ha, I've actually cut down on my drinking for reasons that will be clear in a second. Like I said, Melatonin is great for getting a better night's sleep. That'll limit the random 3am wake-up night-sweats, OMG did I forget that! moments.

Otherwise, I agree with triplesix. I got Dxed w/ Cancer and pretty much threw all the BS out. Everything is fixable. Generally, it's only money and criminal court is much more lax in terms of getting things right and working with oppo counsel and the judge. Ultimately, it's just paper and it doesn't really matter. I get my back up about my Defendants getting screwed or my clients getting ripped off like anyone else, but in terms of the day-to-day stuff, there's just more to life. It's hard in practice (I needed a life-altering event), but if you can reach it, it's almost nirvana-esque. Even then, it takes kill to maintain.

Reply
joshdoctson (Feb 8, 2017 - 2:50 pm)

Join the public sector. Litigation almost exploded my anxiety to unsustainable levels. I now make six figures, get every other Friday off, and can completely shut my brain off at 4pm. More importantly, I never have to deal with a client or field an ass-reaming phone call after hours.

Reply
lawst (Mar 12, 2017 - 3:35 pm)

Depends on the public sector. Public defender, for example. Forget about it. It's an extremely stressful field, and to make matters worse, the pay is low.

Reply
flharfh (Feb 8, 2017 - 3:08 pm)

Regular strenuous exercise helps me a lot.

Reply
anothernjlawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 3:58 pm)

I think anxiety levels can drop substantially the longer you practice, for a few reasons:

1) You're less likely to make mistakes, or to think that you might have made a mistake.

2) You realize that every minor mistake isn't the end of the world, and that even most bigger mistakes, short of blowing a statute of limitations, can generally be cured to some extent.

3) You no longer internalize outcomes or your clients' problems.

4) You generally acquire more control over your own schedule and work product.

5) You realize what is reasonably necessary to competently represent your client, and what is not, and you don't waste time doing unnecessary and ineffective work.

6) You become less afraid of taking a position for fear that the court / other side might think it's "stupid."

The thing that never really completely goes away is schedule unpredictability. You can always get stuck with an emergent matter or a bad court date. If you can shed some of the more low level anxiety, however, I think it helps you deal with the bigger stuff.

Reply
mississippilawyer (Feb 8, 2017 - 10:35 pm)

What anothernNjlawyer said

Reply
jd4hire (Feb 8, 2017 - 4:36 pm)

Exercise and the ability to disconnect from your work. Minimize checking your work email. I also work as hard as possible to avoid the anxiety building situations - lack of preparedness for motions/ depos, having briefs done before the deadline, and saying no to taking on a project when I don't have the time.

I get anxious, but it doesn't seem to bother me near as others I know. True anxiety is debilitating and I'm grateful it doesn't impact me like it does others.

Reply
shikes (Feb 8, 2017 - 9:31 pm)

I'm in litigation and there is obviously constant stress, difficult OC, deadlines everywhere, etc..

I feel like I used to be EXTREMELY anxious all the time. I lately have been able to realize that this may be a chicken and egg situation, a never ending cycle I need to break: most of my anxiety comes from deadlines and too many to-dos, but the to-dos pile up and deadlines approach because I sit around anxious worrying about them rather than just buckling down and doing the assignments/tasks. Lately I have started doing a few things that have really helped: 1) Looking at my calendar 3 days out and seeing what is DUE during those three days. Then focusing on those projects only. I don't do high level litigation, so I don't need more than 3 days prep for anything. 2) I try to just fly through assignments instead of worrying how many I have. They are going to need to get done eventually, and ultimately I get way less stressed when I start checking things off the list; 3) I have started putting my phone in my desk during work. I waste a LOT of time on my phone. I once left my phone at home and spent all day working without it on me. Most productive day of my CAREER without a doubt. You don't need to check news, facebook, etc. over and over and over every 15 mins.; 4) This is easier said than done, but I put away ~6-9 months of savings, and it really made me relax more. I have been at it long enough where I know what I'm doing, I have a good idea of all the tasks I need to fly through during litigation, I have good partners I work for who are available to answer questions, and I ultimately trust myself to make the right moves. With that said, its a job. Unlike some other attorneys, I am happy with a job that pays me 90k to put in 50 hours of work low end litigation and allows me enough money and energy to live a life I like outside of work. If I was offered 125K for 70 hours a week of complex litigation I would probably reject it. Its just a job, I have a bunch of things I like doing in my free time that I would never be able to do otherwise. Back in law school I used to think I wanted to be some huge name lawyer that worked 100 hours a week to come up with arguments for the supreme court or some major BP oil spill type case. Now I have a different mentality. My ambitions rest with spending time with my kids, my hobbies, international vacations, etc.. A job is a job is a job, its literally nothing more to me. Worst case scenario, if I get fired, I have 6-9 months of savings and I'll hopefully find a similar job during that time that will allow me to continue chugging along.

Reply
lawst (Mar 12, 2017 - 3:43 pm)

You make a lot of good points. I recognize myself in your remarks about phone usage at work.

I find that my anxiety levels decrease when I prepare. So much of my worry and anxiety stems from thinking about this and that that needs to be done. Once I do it, the anxiety decreases.

Ultimately that leads me to the next problem I face. My work is often rote, routine, tedious, making it difficult to complete the work. So I often put it off, and the anxiety continues to build.

Reply
trickydick (Feb 8, 2017 - 11:07 pm)

Most attorneys cope with stress through substance abuse, women, or (for the few who succeed in this line of work) by spending money.

If you're referring to anxiety in the sense of someone avoiding conflict or being afraid of public speaking, I don't see it. People like that don't survive long in this profession, I don't think.

I don't know any attorneys who struggle with anxiety in that sense. Most attorneys are either manic or have anger management problems. A few have this sort of angry depressive personality thing going on.

Reply
parlance (Feb 9, 2017 - 1:11 am)

I have a history of anxiety going back to my early childhood. It sort of predated my intention to become a lawyer. I have very rarely in my like taken medication; it's not something I'm a big proponent of.

The anxiety attacks I have nowadays are less pronounced than what I once dealt with. When I was young I used to have these hallucinations where the room the would feel bigger and bigger and I would feel smaller and smaller. I think those are called night terrors. I now have those very rarely, maybe once in a blue moon, but it's always in a moment of genuine stress over something very serious, whereas it used to happen often for no apparent reason.

My typical day-to-day anxiety, such as filing something on time, drafting my papers correctly, getting to court promptly rarely goes overboard. That's what I call workaday anxiety and I usually walk it off over the weekend or some evening when I get out early. But I've experienced anxiety over a host of real world problems to an unfathomable magnitude and few people have had to cope to the degree that I have had. But hey, no one's perfect.

Reply
guyingorillasuit (Feb 9, 2017 - 2:17 am)

I agree with what anothernjlawyer said.

Also, coco, I practice in the same field - family law. I found that the best way to reduce stress is to take the middle position and stick to your guns. That way, you're always reasonable and righteous. If you have to fight, you are likely to prevail, and look good in front of your client and the court. Most of the fighting comes from attorneys with personal beefs against each other, and attorneys who take unreasonable positions.

If you are a reasonable person, your stress will be greatly reduced. You will have a reputation as a fair guy with other lawyers and with judges. If a jerk tries to bully you, the judge will see right through it, and you will deliver your client a glorious victory :)

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 9, 2017 - 11:36 am)

Oh I agree with that. Unfortunately in my past practice I didn't have a choice. I had to advance our client's positions, regardless of merit. Then I had to do tons of research to try to make an argument to back our asinine position.

Thankfully I just took a position with DCSS so eh. Life will be way less stressful. I need to prepared to say "the department is disinterested in this matter." Plus simple enforcement. Oh thank the good lord.

Reply
guyingorillasuit (Feb 9, 2017 - 7:55 pm)

How do these types of lawyers survive in the long run? I mean the ones who always argue an extreme position regardless of the merits? Every time they come to Court, all of the judges and other attorneys think "here comes the a*shole". How can they stay in business when they promise results to their clients that they can't deliver?

Reply
kansas (Feb 11, 2017 - 10:01 pm)

Hey GIGS, hope you are very well! I just had an experience with a guy who does this, in my capacity as a right of way agent for a public agency. He sells it as representing "constitutional rights of property owners" - and fights the cases 1)if the clients keep paying OR 2)if he has a chance to get decent statutory fees. If there's no chance for significant fees he dumps them after he gets his 5 or 10 G nuisance fee. I had to grudgingly respect the dude as the king of the nuisance lawsuit - it was super annoying, but he got a good result for himself if not the client, just by staying unreasonable for long enough, I paid him ten grand to go away. The guy has filed, fought hard and lost not less than 10 reported appeals over various land use or condemnation issues in the past decade. All with very weak arguments - a perfect losing record in decided cases actually. The volume indicates to me that he must have settled a lot of others, because that's a lot of appellate lit for a dude with a strip mall solo real estate practice.

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 13, 2017 - 11:30 am)

Well we didn't have ton's of clients, just a lot of high dollar clients. They can pay for our asinine research. Every once in a while you find some obscure case that helps put your argument together and you hit pay dirt. When that happens your client thinks you are a magician, opposing counsels look on in bewilderment, and you get 5 high dollar referrals from that case.

The rest of the time, opposing counsel just looks at you like your an idiot. The Court rolls their eyes, and your client gets boned. Its a sad existence. The anxiety to meet billable hours, perform, and meet expectations of a meticulous firm (I once had to grammar errors in a brief and my partner ripped my head off). It was one of the major reasons I wanted to apply for the department. I was getting more depressed every day.

Reply
employmentlawyer (Feb 9, 2017 - 4:33 am)

I have anxiety and the only solution for me was to get out of the law. It didn't suit my personality and only added to my anxiety. Since mostly quitting the practice of law I have been much healthier and happier.

Other than that I can only stress the importance of good self-care including sleep, exercise, eating well and mediation. I know that all of that can be hard to fit into the busy schedule of practicing law.

My husband is not a lawyer but he suffered debilitating anxiety. Medical marijuana helps him a lot. It has completely turned his life around for the better. So I always share his experience to those who mention anxiety.

Reply
thirdtierlaw (Feb 9, 2017 - 6:07 am)

Though it's been mentioned, exercise. Many studies have shown that elevating your heart rate for as little as 20 minutes a day through physical activity can be just as effective as medication for anxiety and depression. It also improves memory and attention.

It's a pain, especially when you're super busy. But doing it may honestly save your life.

Just so I'm clear, it doesn't have to be an intense workout. Sitting on a stationary bike, lifting, a brisk walk, etc. can be enough.

So you really could do it at lunch time or when you first wake in the morning.

Reply
tcpaul (Feb 9, 2017 - 9:44 am)

Calisthenics.

Reply
qdllc (Feb 9, 2017 - 9:49 am)

Stress and anxiety is a reality in most ANY job.

I think the rule is to decide if the PROs of your job sufficiently outweigh the CONs. Knowing WHY you chose to stay in your given position goes a long way to addressing issues of stress and anxiety.

Work environment is also key. An office that keeps it casual and light as to not ADD to your emotional burdens is helpful. A pressure-cooker environment is destructive.

So, in law, the field is either wrong for you as a whole, your area of practice is needlessly stressful (not right for your personal values and ethics), or your law office fosters an unhealthy environment and you'd be better off working elsewhere.

If you resort to chemical means to cope (over/binge eating, alcohol, medications), it's time to ask some hard questions. No "career" should cost you your health and happiness to that extent.

Reply
cranky (Feb 9, 2017 - 12:54 pm)

Shikes gives great advice. When I got rid of the Facebook app on my phone, I felt so much more productive and less ADHD-like without the phone dinging every time some FB acquaintance posted some lame update ("eating lunch- look at this picture of my plate!" "I'm hungry!" "I did laundry and found my missing shirt!") It does sound even better to work a whole day without the cellphone around, but I need it for work.

As for anxiety, yeah, I had bouts of it when I was working for a poorly run firm and doing a ton of bad cases. The solution was finding another job.

Reply
sillydood (Feb 9, 2017 - 1:34 pm)

1) Adopt a strong internal IDGAF attitude towards work. The trick is to have enough interests/passions that work is just a means to an end and you can take it or leave it. That doesn't mean you slack at work, but you put it in its place.

2) Intense regular (5x week at least) physical activity. Pick something you enjoy to make it sustainable - could be biking, swimming, backpacking, lifting, or combos of things.

3) Regular sex is a huge booster.

4) Find a job you love. Do not think about money beyond what you really **need**. And if you really honestly evaluate what you need, it's probably 1/3 or less than the lifestyle you're trying to maintain now.

Reply
mtbislife (Feb 9, 2017 - 2:23 pm)

Totally agree, especially with #4. Typically people who make more spend more.

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 9, 2017 - 3:18 pm)

I am married so regular sex is a LOL moment. I "had" long work hours, a needy wife, and a toddler so the time to regularly work out is minimal.

I think I didn't have any on your list. My new job change should help out with 2 and 4. The 3 one well....massage parlors?

Reply
lifeofleisure (Feb 13, 2017 - 7:14 pm)

Only one solution: leave the profession, but keep your law license because it will be handy for the replacement business/vocation. Leave it all behind. And don't look back.

Reply
cocolawyer (Feb 15, 2017 - 6:16 pm)

Everyone says that but no one does it because no one knows what else they would do.

Reply
attorneyinct (Feb 15, 2017 - 6:02 pm)

I watch tv/drink/work out every single moment I'm not at work so I won't think about my job. Otherwise, I keep thinking about where I went wrong...

Reply
entrepreneurlawyer (Feb 23, 2017 - 1:20 pm)

Has anyone tried working on your personal development, beyond yoga, I mean? My
legal career as a lawyer, mediator and Ombuds has been about helping other people deal with difficult, stressful, sometimes life-threatening, situations. I've swallowed a ton of tears and lost sleep over clients and my practice. What worked was getting more self-aware, slowing down and making the time to examine my feelings. Changing my success model didn't hurt either.

Spend some time studying you, your body and what you're actually afraid of because the same powerful minds that allow us to help our clients can also trap us in what seems like logical doubt and concern. Do the work like cocolawyer is doing.

Afraid you don't know where the next case is coming from. Take a deep look at that. What do you imagine will happen? If the worst happened,what could you do as a response? Having this answers in your back pocket allows your mind to let go of the negative predictions. Or, at least, that's what I found. Also, doing something totally scary like learning to swim after 60 helped me to really look at my behaviors when Im afraid and change them. Im much braver than I thought and I bet you are, too.

I like reading about emotional intelligence. Emotional Intelligence 2.0 was good and so was Daring Greatly by Brene Brown for getting into the right headspace.

Reply
jorgedeclaro (Feb 28, 2017 - 1:30 am)

No solution as of yet. Trial prep makes me physically ill. You'd never know it looking at me in the courtroom, but for the three days before trial I probably average less than four hours of sleep a night. During those days I will inevitably stop and drink half a can of beer to get my heart to stop racing. Too many direct examinations to script. Too many expert cross examinations to draft. How did that exhibit not get in our trial management report?

By day two of trial, I have usually calmed down when I'm outside of the courtroom.

Reply
attorneyinct (Mar 1, 2017 - 6:17 pm)

Going to the gym helps but it's the getting there part that sucks.

Reply
Post a message in this thread