Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

EASIEST PASS UBE jurisdiction for 2017

Hi I am trying to figure out if Ii should take either the no orv201703/15/17
Why would you event want to live in either of those states? attorneyinct03/15/17
UBE is portable, you muppet dingbat03/15/17
That's fair, I did it to myself. attorneyinct03/15/17
learn to google: Query "pass rate north dakota bar exam": dingbat03/15/17
You test against other students sitting in your massive room dakotalaw03/15/17
Passing the UBE in one jurisdiction with lowest possible pas agentdalecooper03/15/17
wow, no, you're wrong. you can port a UBE score that fails dingbat03/16/17
Stop picking fights! Read admin's strict Fora Rules. I a agentdalecooper03/16/17
no, I disagree. The only downside is the extra cost. You d dingbat03/16/17
This seems like a lot of trouble to go through for the sake trollfeeder03/16/17
orv2017 (Mar 15, 2017 - 9:02 pm)

Hi I am trying to figure out if Ii should take either the north dakota or nebraska bar exams? Does anyone know, which one is easiest to get a higher score? thanks

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attorneyinct (Mar 15, 2017 - 9:08 pm)

Why would you event want to live in either of those states?

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dingbat (Mar 15, 2017 - 10:20 pm)

UBE is portable, you muppet

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attorneyinct (Mar 15, 2017 - 10:35 pm)

That's fair, I did it to myself.

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dingbat (Mar 15, 2017 - 10:22 pm)

learn to google:

Query "pass rate north dakota bar exam":
Search Results
Of the 78 applicants who sat for the two-day North Dakota bar exam in July, 49 passed, a 63 percent pass rate, compared to 76 percent a year ago. For those taking the North Dakota exam for the first time, 64 percent passed, compared to 81 percent a year ago.

Query "pass rate nebraska bar exam":
Year Total Taking Percent Passing
2014 213 70%
2013 189 74%
2012 111 73%
2011 134 78%

pro-tip: if you can't figure out how to use google, you're going to suck as an attorney.

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dakotalaw (Mar 15, 2017 - 11:00 pm)

You test against other students sitting in your massive room. The essays test is curved at the state level.

Test in the state with the lowest LSAT pool and then you can trasfer it anywhere.

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agentdalecooper (Mar 15, 2017 - 11:19 pm)

Passing the UBE in one jurisdiction with lowest possible passing score to "port" it to another jurisdiction is nonsense. I used my UBE to get into two states. You need to do C&F in both, pay full fee in both, have a current MPRE in both, and a UBE that would pass in THAT jurisdiction. So AttyinCT has the right question but let's rephrase: do you think you can find a law job in parochial "old boy" networks like ND or NE? Its not easy. No AttyinCT is not a "muppet," the above comment insulting him is senseless.

With average study my score could get me into any UBE state. Those thresholds may seem a lot of "points" apart but in reality most passers are well over say 260. But if you get your bare minimum to port to any state and did NE/ND C&F then congrats you get to spend a grand or more transferring and more hoops to promptly resign in NE/ND.

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dingbat (Mar 16, 2017 - 8:17 am)

wow, no, you're wrong. you can port a UBE score that fails in the state you took it in, and still get accepted elsewhere. YOU DON"T NEED TO GET ACCEPTED IN THE STATE WHERE YOU TAKE THE TEST. You can also have a failing MPRE score in the state where you take the test, as long as it's sufficient in the state where you want to get admitted. (not to mention that the MPRE is piss-easy)
But, even if that weren't true, the passing score in North Dakota is 260 - the lowest passing score in the nation. They also have a turnaround time of approximately 6-7 weeks, which is one of the faster ones.

The UBE isn't curved on a state-wide level either. The MBE is scored nationwide. The MEE isn't curved state-wide either, but it is scored on a state-by-state basis, and some graders are more lenient than others.

The bigger issue is cost. Most states don't split the cost between the test and C&F, and it can cost a thousand dollars to take the test in a different state. But, if you think you're a borderline candidate, and there are plenty of people who are (especially those who've already failed once before), then it's absolutely a valid question to see which jurisdiction's examiners are the most lenient. An extra point or two can make all the difference in the world.

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agentdalecooper (Mar 16, 2017 - 8:55 am)

Stop picking fights! Read admin's strict Fora Rules.

I already went over why its silly to take a test in a jurisdiction you have no intent on practicing in and you therein agree with everything I said: new C&F, new fees, another multi-month wait. OP needs to take the test where you can realistically get a job, not in flyover or an "easy" state.

I am waiving into my third state with a single UBE score. It is all covered by the firm but I would not subject myself to the headache of keeping up multiple licenses in non-bordering states on my owm time or dime.

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dingbat (Mar 16, 2017 - 9:21 am)

no, I disagree. The only downside is the extra cost. You don't need to actually bother with C&F in the state where you take the exam, if you're not interested in being admitted there - and you certainly don't need to wait to be admitted prior to applying for admission elssewhere.

You can, for example, apply to take the bar in North Dakota, then apply to New York for admission on motion of transferred UBE score and if things go smoothly, be admitted to New York before NY examinees even get their results back.

Not saying it's right for everyone, but I certainly can see why someone would want to do so.

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trollfeeder (Mar 16, 2017 - 8:26 am)

This seems like a lot of trouble to go through for the sake of a slightly more forgiving curve. Regardless of where you take it, the bar is just a 12 hour or so mental stress test. It is all a matter of conditioning your mind to see the patterns and stay motivated from start to finish.

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