Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

94 year old lawyer "still loves his beautiful profession"

I stumbled across this article today. Although I don't share greenhorn03/20/17
Some people do like the legal profession, specially old time ternarydaemon03/20/17
This. Here's an interesting tidbit: The Wikipedia page on US onehell03/20/17
It doesn't really speak for itself. It is only relevant in ruralattorney03/20/17
"I'm not sure whether the average graduating class is larger jonthomas03/20/17
180 (onehell's post). Also, I know a dood who lives in a ram wolfman03/20/17
Guys, I'm not trying to suggest that law is a growing indust greenhorn03/20/17
Why is the picture of him from 1988? jonthomas03/20/17
As much as we vilify Boomers on here, looks like there are s sillydood03/20/17
This guy is greatest generation. He was practicing law when flharfh03/20/17
I'm glad someone still does. isthisit03/20/17
After spiking somewhat immediately after WWII because of GI lawprof03/20/17
So it's even worse than the number of schools would indicate onehell03/20/17
There was a judge here who worked until I think he was 95. R fettywap03/20/17
The greatest generation had some remarkable attorneys who I boomeresq03/20/17
i have bern a,trial lawyer for 20 years and plan to do it ti defensivelawyer03/20/17
That photo of his was taken in 1988...whoaaaaaaa mrlollipop03/21/17
Today: http://www.northjersey.com/videos/n ews/bergen/hack agentdalecooper03/21/17
I like this guy, all the misgivings about law as a career fi wolfman03/21/17
An Italian American lawyer must have had almost God status i madathofstra03/21/17
greenhorn (Mar 20, 2017 - 12:56 pm)

I stumbled across this article today. Although I don't share his view that this is "a beautiful profession," I will say that I admire this guy for his determination and commitment. The guy is 94 years old and still trying cases ! God bless him. In my book, this guy is pretty awesome.

And I'm sure he's not still working because he "needs the money." I know we're all jaded here, but this guy is inspiring and its nice to see a lawyer who loves what he does so much.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/good-news/at-94-new-jersey-lawyer-still-loves-his-job/ar-BBys7uP?li=AAk6ORB&ocid=spartandhp

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ternarydaemon (Mar 20, 2017 - 2:32 pm)

Some people do like the legal profession, specially old timers that grew up with financial security and, you could say, some level of respect and personal fulfillment from being recognized as a lawyer by his community.

Try saying today that you are a lawyer in your average suburb. A plumber would get more respect.

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onehell (Mar 20, 2017 - 4:19 pm)

This. Here's an interesting tidbit: The Wikipedia page on US law schools allows you to sort the list by year founded:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_law_schools_in_the_United_States

By my count, 99 of the 203 ABA accredited law schools in the USA did not exist when this dude started practicing in 1951.

That fact speaks for itself, IMHO.

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ruralattorney (Mar 20, 2017 - 4:52 pm)

It doesn't really speak for itself. It is only relevant in the context of the overall population in the country and the number of students enrolled. In 1950, the population was 152 million. Today it is 318 million. I'm not sure whether the average graduating class is larger or similar.

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jonthomas (Mar 20, 2017 - 6:22 pm)

"I'm not sure whether the average graduating class is larger or similar."

Campos did a blog post on this. The class sizes did increase at most schools (with the bottom schools being most pronounced) and the rate of growth of attorneys has significantly outpaced the rate of growth of the population.

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wolfman (Mar 20, 2017 - 4:55 pm)

180 (onehell's post). Also, I know a dood who lives in a ramshackle house he inherited out in the sticks in a far rural part of New England and paints traditional Russian/Greek Orthodox icons on wooden boards using only traditional materials, like the monks in years past (he's not himself Russian, Greek, or a monk, to the best of my knowledge). He mostly does odd jobs outside of that, is dirt poor, but seems very happy and fulfilled (the house is his free and clear). This does not make traditional Orthodox icon-painting a growth industry.

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greenhorn (Mar 20, 2017 - 6:01 pm)

Guys, I'm not trying to suggest that law is a growing industry or that people should attend law school. I've done my share of talking people of our law school (at least those who really shouldn't go to law school).

But, I think this gentleman is impressive. 94 years old and still trying cases and doing a fine job ! Regardless of how terrible law is, I think that he's doing what he's doing is pretty cool !

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jonthomas (Mar 20, 2017 - 6:23 pm)

Why is the picture of him from 1988?

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sillydood (Mar 20, 2017 - 6:27 pm)

As much as we vilify Boomers on here, looks like there are some nice ones after all!

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flharfh (Mar 20, 2017 - 6:36 pm)

This guy is greatest generation. He was practicing law when the boomers were in diapers.

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isthisit (Mar 20, 2017 - 6:38 pm)

I'm glad someone still does.

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lawprof (Mar 20, 2017 - 6:54 pm)

After spiking somewhat immediately after WWII because of GI Bill benefits, total enrollment at ABA law schools fell to a post-war low of just under 32,000 in 1953. Enrollment grew very rapidly starting in the late 1960s, because of the demographics of the baby boom, and because women started going to law school in more than tiny numbers (Ruth Bader Ginsberg was one of nine women in a 500+ Harvard first year class in 1956).

Enrollment topped out at 147,500 in 2010, and has been declining since, in part because some irresponsible law professors started question the value of a law degree, which Science has determined to be priceless, i.e., approximately infinite. Total JD enrollment this year is around 110,000, that is, down 25% from its peak.

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onehell (Mar 20, 2017 - 8:10 pm)

So it's even worse than the number of schools would indicate. Population doubled while law school enrollment increased about five-fold. Regulatory complexity for business clients may have increased, but even if enrollment had only kept pace with population growth, there'd probably still be too many lawyers because most lawyers still primarily seek to represent individuals in the middle and upper-middle classes. Those classes are shrinking with the decline in domestic manufacturing. And what is left of the middle class hires a lawyer on what, maybe 0-4 occasions in an entire lifetime?

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fettywap (Mar 20, 2017 - 7:39 pm)

There was a judge here who worked until I think he was 95. Really nice man. He was far more patient with my difficult client than the younger judges. He died not long after he retired.

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boomeresq (Mar 20, 2017 - 7:59 pm)

The greatest generation had some remarkable attorneys who I was privileged to know. I appeared many timesbefore a judge who lost an arm at Iwo Jima. I knew another who in World War 2 was in a unit that operated on skis. On the other side I defended a guy who was a Merrill Marauder. All incredible walking history.

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defensivelawyer (Mar 20, 2017 - 8:01 pm)

i have bern a,trial lawyer for 20 years and plan to do it till i am dead, even if the fee is low. i like it.

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mrlollipop (Mar 21, 2017 - 10:09 am)

That photo of his was taken in 1988...whoaaaaaaa

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agentdalecooper (Mar 21, 2017 - 10:50 am)

Today:

http://www.northjersey.com/videos/news/bergen/hackensack/2017/02/15/video-frank-lucianna-94-year-old-attorney/97922374/

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wolfman (Mar 21, 2017 - 1:52 pm)

I like this guy, all the misgivings about law as a career field aside...

Here's a thought: isn't law (meaning small-time solo practice) actually a good "retirement" career, especially if (and only if) you already have plenty of money or a pension from something else? There was a guy here who was, I believe, in his 60s, and was a PD in Hawaii, or something like that? What do people think? I don't mean it's necessarily fun to do this decaade after decade (as this guy has clearly done, and enjoyed it), but what about specifically re-activating your law licence at like 65 and trying to pick up small crim cases, instead of just collecting your pension?

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madathofstra (Mar 21, 2017 - 1:47 pm)

An Italian American lawyer must have had almost God status in 1951.

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