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Academic Success YouTube Videos

A couple of months ago I started a law student academic succ beaubaez04/10/17
Lesson one: do not attend if you must take on debt and you c adamb04/10/17
Adam, I think it depends on why someone wants to go to law s beaubaez04/13/17
The word definitely is out there in multiple forms. It's jus ejs201704/13/17
I'm not sure how to deal with unreasonable expectations. I beaubaez04/14/17
That's a stunner. The information is out there. Their ejs201704/15/17
Beau, you're conflating expectations with being insulted. I themapmaster04/14/17
Mr. Baez, the problem is not that the students expect to mak guyingorillasuit04/14/17
That was Beau's point, I think. It's sobering coming from yo ejs201704/15/17
One day in class, when we were discussing probabilities, I d beaubaez04/21/17
eh, it depends on the phrasing of the question. Right now th thirdtierlaw04/21/17
beaubaez (Apr 10, 2017 - 4:04 pm)

A couple of months ago I started a law student academic success YouTube channel because I could not find a single channel that had this kind of material. I am interested in feedback, positive and negative, on what I can do to make the channel better and more useful for law students. Here is a link to my latest video, which provides 10 exam day tips: https://youtu.be/68VwJz_BdLE

Also, if you have some topics you think I should cover please let me know. My goal is to make a channel that law students will find useful, and to make it from my perspective as a law professor with almost 20 years of teaching experience. Thanks in advance for your comments!

Beau Baez

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adamb (Apr 10, 2017 - 5:52 pm)

Lesson one: do not attend if you must take on debt and you cannot muster the lsat score for T14 (or 12 or whatever it is now).

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beaubaez (Apr 13, 2017 - 8:31 am)

Adam, I think it depends on why someone wants to go to law school. The real problem right now is that too many people go to law school because they want to make lots of money--that is not the reason to go, and ultimately will lead to dissatisfaction with the profession. Also, many law students don't have a good idea of what law practice is all about. If we can get the message out that law is not about making lots of money we would have a significant reduction in the number of law students. With a 10% to 20% reduction in law students there would be plenty of jobs to go around.

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ejs2017 (Apr 13, 2017 - 9:26 am)

The word definitely is out there in multiple forms. It's just not being heeded.

Had I the benefit of a site like JDU when I went to law school I am confident that I would have decided against it. I plead lack of information which is no longer the case.

I use as an example the article about Cooley Law School that was referenced in a separate thread. Despite job placement statistics in the 30-ish percentile, the average cost of law school being in excess of $150,000.00 depending upon the school, concrete numbers about the bimodal salary distribution, that new Cooley grads have a snowball's chance in hell of being in the top end of the distribution, average lawyer salaries in the $57,000.00 range, and unemployment statistics for new lawyers, Cooley still draws in 1,000 or so new law students every year.

I accept that there are people who see Russian Roulette as a challenge and get a rush from engaging in it.

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beaubaez (Apr 14, 2017 - 4:47 pm)

I'm not sure how to deal with unreasonable expectations. I was teaching a course at a 4th tier law school, and I mentioned in passing that no one in the room was going to get hired at a Wall Street firm right out of law school. You should have seen the looks that I got from the students, who were deeply insulted that I would make that statement.

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ejs2017 (Apr 15, 2017 - 12:36 pm)

That's a stunner. The information is out there.

Their expectations and disappointment are being driven by the propaganda spouted by schools in addition to inflated employment statistics. All one needs to do is to look at the roster of any of these firms to see from where they currently hire.

Graduates of my now Tier 2 school used to have a shot at some of the bigger New York and Chicago firms. Now, with the abundance of new grads and T14 grads clamoring for jobs and feeling fortunate to get them why would any top market firm lay out money to bring in an associate from a lower-ranked school? It still blows my mind to read tales from T6 grads still seeking work post-graduation and bar passage.

The lower-ranked grads still have a shot at a staff attorney job in white shoe world but even then the big firms are seeking top grads from lower-ranked schools for what is simply a glorified document review project. It's truly scary.

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themapmaster (Apr 14, 2017 - 8:12 pm)

Beau, you're conflating expectations with being insulted. I don't expect to make big law partner anywhere, but if someone told me that I'm never going to -- which is a gratuitous statement because it's stating the obvious, it sounds like he/she is trying to pour salt in the wound. Why else say it? Douche bag remark.

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guyingorillasuit (Apr 14, 2017 - 8:54 pm)

Mr. Baez, the problem is not that the students expect to make lots of money. The problem is that third tier and fourth tier law schools destroy the lives of most of their students by saddling them with debt they can never pay back. This debt, which most of them struggle to service even while on IBR, renders them unable to participate in society - buy homes, have decent credit, save money and invest. That is the law schools' fault. They know what their students are likely to earn, and despite having that knowledge, still charge them fees that are nothing short of unconscionable. We all know there is no return on investment for the dominant majority of matriculants in these types of schools.

The law is an honorable profession, and students should not be enrolling in hopes of earning biglaw salaries. However, law schools should not be exploiting these students and stripping them of their futures before they even have a chance at a career.

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ejs2017 (Apr 15, 2017 - 12:45 pm)

That was Beau's point, I think. It's sobering coming from your law professor when it should have come from your admissions office but even having those expectations in this day and age is inexcusable. I remember my corporations professor (HLS grad) telling us that he would never recommend any graduate of our school for a job at Skadden. Now? No chance to even get that consideration.

As I said before had I the advantage of the collected wisdom of JDU and TLS and Professor Campos' blog before I went to law school I would have made much different decisions about whether I went to school and where I went to school. Despite the abundance of information, there are Cooley students who cite to isolated examples of Cooley grads in high places as evidence of the value of the degree. Their aspirations are just not supported statistically.

That said, I struggle to feel sorry for someone who ignores the truth after being beaten about the head with it.

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beaubaez (Apr 21, 2017 - 7:31 am)

One day in class, when we were discussing probabilities, I decided to ask the following question: "how many of you believe that you can become the President of the United States?" Almost every hand--about 70 students--went up. Not that people shouldn't have dreams, but those dreams need to be tempered by realistic expectations.

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thirdtierlaw (Apr 21, 2017 - 10:32 am)

eh, it depends on the phrasing of the question. Right now the constitution bars me from becoming president due to my age. Once I turn 35, I CAN become president. Is it likely I'd ever become president? Absolutely not, it's unlikely I could even get elected to my local school board.

Same reason I don't play the lottery. Can I win the lottery? If I bought a ticket, I most certainly could win. It is just extremely unlikely.

Every law school in the country hammers home the idea that individual words matter. Mays vs. shalls and all that good stuff. So unless one of those 70 students were not U.S. citizens or were going to die prior to reaching the age of 35, they were correct.

I understand your point. I'm just confused why you're trying to make that point to students in your law school class. If you were giving that talk at orientation when they could still back out, that'd be a public service. Once they're already committed, I agree with themapmaster, it is just rubbing salt into the wound. You aren't being paid to be a guidance or career counselor. If a student comes up to you after class or office hours have those conversations. I'd have been pretty furious if my law school professors started to give off-the-cuff remarks about the issue.

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