Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Salary Resources

What sites/ resources do you check when doing research on po jd4hire07/12/17
Honestly, the salary websites often do more harm than good. mrtor07/12/17
I'm gonna modify this a little. Whatever they offer you, as dingbat07/12/17
Check to see whether your state bar conducts and publishes a themapmaster07/12/17
for larger firms, NALP data is invaluable dingbat07/12/17
My jx definitely does not have this. Before I begin a google jd4hire07/12/17
Mind blown. I just emailed the executive director of my jx jd4hire07/12/17
Indeed says a lawyer in my city averages about $60,000 a yea fettywap07/12/17
jd4hire (Jul 12, 2017 - 9:29 am)

What sites/ resources do you check when doing research on potential employers or industries?

I know the various public employee databases, glassdoor, salary.com, RobertHalf (ridiculously out of whack, IMO) and the new LinkedIn salary info.

Curious if there are others people find helpful.

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mrtor (Jul 12, 2017 - 9:50 am)

Honestly, the salary websites often do more harm than good. It is very difficult to use anonymous data in any meaningful way. There is usually no way to tell how much experience the reporters have or which practice groups they are in. A newer attorney seeing an anonymous report of $100k may not realize that it was made by a mid- or late-career attorney. Using that $100k benchmark, that newer attorney may decline or feel short changed by the entry level salary offer.

Given the rise of the information economy, most employers have figured out the market rate (within a couple thousand) and stick to it. You have little or no bargaining power unless you have a book of business or experience in a very specialized niche. If you see a job that interests you, apply. See what they put out there. If you can live on it, take it. Citing salary data to them isn't going to get you anywhere.

That being said, you've listed about every salary resource there is. Salaries are closely guarded (by employers and workers) and very difficult to ascertain.

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dingbat (Jul 12, 2017 - 10:19 am)

I'm gonna modify this a little. Whatever they offer you, ask for a little bit more. Use wording that allows you to accept the initial offer without losing face, but you may as well try to bump it up a little. "I appreciate your offer of $80k, but I was really hoping for $85k" or something thereabouts. You can usually get a small increase, 5%, maybe 10% if you're lucky.

If it's a small employer, they may not have figured out the market quite as well, and they're also more inclined to get the best deal possible - but they may be more likely to fall in love with a particular candidate - so you might get more traction there.

Related: smaller employers are also more likely to try and get you to state your required salary first. Try not to do it. Early in the process try to find out what general salary range they're looking at, so that when they ask you what you want, you know their acceptable range.

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themapmaster (Jul 12, 2017 - 10:04 am)

Check to see whether your state bar conducts and publishes a survey once every so many years where firms report how much they are grossing, spending on overhead, paying associate attorneys, paying secretaries, etc. This survey, if it exists is your state, is more informative and accurate than anything else from a career services deparrment or the webs.

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dingbat (Jul 12, 2017 - 10:40 am)

for larger firms, NALP data is invaluable

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jd4hire (Jul 12, 2017 - 11:10 am)

My jx definitely does not have this. Before I begin a google campaign to identify those that do, are you aware of any of the top of your head? I'd love to get a look at some of these and suggest that our bar do the same.

I once proposed a salary survey in our new lawyers' committee of our bar and the executive committee members (older attorneys) shot it down and said it would be harmful...they are all partners at firms and didn't want the info getting out!

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jd4hire (Jul 12, 2017 - 1:23 pm)

Mind blown. I just emailed the executive director of my jx bar association to suggest that they start conducting these surveys. While I don't practice in any of the below states, I still found the information contained within very interesting.

Here is a link to a few I quickly found on Google -

New Mexico - http://www.nmbar.org/nmbardocs/pubres/reports/2017LawyerCompensationSurvey.pdf

Iowa (http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/iowabar.siteym.com/resource/resmgr/Iowa_Lawyer_Weekly_June_2015/2015_ISBA_Economic_Survey.pdf

Oregon - https://www.osbar.org/_docs/resources/econsurveys/12economicsurvey.pdf

Michigan - https://www.michbar.org/file/pmrc/articles/0000151.pdf

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fettywap (Jul 12, 2017 - 2:24 pm)

Indeed says a lawyer in my city averages about $60,000 a year. Official numbers say $100,000 a year. I doubt overpaid attorneys are searching through jobs on Indeed very often. You're not going to find very accurate numbers.

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