Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Ideal Time to Make a Move

In others' opinion, when is the best time to try and transit jd4hire08/03/17
3-5. Your window is about to close. bucwild08/03/17
Most entry in-house gigs have 3-5 year experience requiremen isthisit08/03/17
Seconded. If you haven't already passed it, you're quickly a mrtor08/03/17
Word. The jobs I look at normally are a little higher. An jd4hire08/03/17
No kidding? I'm curious as to whether it's 9-12 years of exp mrtor08/03/17
People are changing jobs like crazy right now. I'd prepare a vohod08/03/17
Vodod, I tend to agree. Why do you think that's so? ID pa nofaultkillself08/03/17
Unemployment is low and outside law, especially in lower wag loblawyer08/04/17
I think there are two ways to look at it: (1) if all you ev lolwutjobs08/03/17
I don't know if there is really a stock answer to this. I o jeffm08/03/17
Hell WFB, JPM, and USBank have public job postings looking f vohod08/04/17
I believe (or at least hope) the window is longer if you're loblawyer08/04/17
I'm dealing with this issue now. I started in-house in my dr barneystinson08/05/17
Look for a government job. Leave that dump. Leave the privat vohod08/05/17
jd4hire (Aug 3, 2017 - 9:28 am)

In others' opinion, when is the best time to try and transition away from ID litigation? In essence, when will I have the most likelihood of succeeding in an effort to go in-house? Is there a sweet spot?

I'm 6 years out from school. All ID litigation experience.

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bucwild (Aug 3, 2017 - 11:24 am)

3-5. Your window is about to close.

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isthisit (Aug 3, 2017 - 9:32 am)

Most entry in-house gigs have 3-5 year experience requirements. So you should have started applying 3 years ago.

ABL (always be lateralling)

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mrtor (Aug 3, 2017 - 9:43 am)

Seconded. If you haven't already passed it, you're quickly approaching the point of no return. Employers in new fields want candidates who have matured enough to know what they want, but are still malleable and not yet set in their ways. You are looking very set in your ways if you haven't searched for new opportunities in six years.

That said, you will always have at least some exit options (i.e., in-house with an insurer). They just may not get you out of ID.

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jd4hire (Aug 3, 2017 - 9:47 am)

Word. The jobs I look at normally are a little higher. An in-house gig I'm eyeing has 9-12. But I will heed advise and start applying.

And I've made two moves in my short six years. Went from outside counsel ID firm (4 years) to staff counsel for large carrier (5 months - terrible decision) and back to outside counsel ID firm (love the firm, hate billing time).

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mrtor (Aug 3, 2017 - 10:06 am)

No kidding? I'm curious as to whether it's 9-12 years of experience or 9-12 years of "relevant" experience. It's tough to transplant an experienced attorney into totally different fields of law and justify paying them six figures to try to learn it and get up to speed.

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vohod (Aug 3, 2017 - 11:39 am)

People are changing jobs like crazy right now. I'd prepare a current resume and writing sample tonight and apply to positions that interest you.

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nofaultkillself (Aug 3, 2017 - 8:01 pm)

Vodod,

I tend to agree. Why do you think that's so? ID partners don't seem to have a problem with hiring associates with brief (12+ mo) stays at their prior firms.

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loblawyer (Aug 4, 2017 - 7:58 am)

Unemployment is low and outside law, especially in lower wage fields, people are demanding more or simply no showing for jobs and interviews. Even here it's been reported that low pay associate positions are tough to keep filled and also have no shows.

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lolwutjobs (Aug 3, 2017 - 10:12 pm)

I think there are two ways to look at it: (1) if all you ever want to be is a worker bee, then you should try to move in-house or to a government position and your ability to really do so is closing quickly and is probably ideal 3-5 years out (although I have seen some postings for as much as 10 years experience) or (2) if you want to be "your own boss", then you should concentrate on building a book of clients based upon your litigation skills and in whatever area you deem appropriate. The ideal time is very likely appropriate now, and it would make sense to switch firms to start specializing in a certain practice area that lends it self to obtaining certain clients (i.e. environmental law, land use/zoning, etc.) I have invested in the latter, and moved from ID to health care law about two years ago, and have been slowly building a book of physicians, physical therapists, and other covered entities as clients. As a general concept, everyone was really impressed with my "litigation experience" that I obtained from my prior ID firm. Time will tell if I made the right decision, but I do not think I could live with myself without doing everything I could to build my own book.

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jeffm (Aug 3, 2017 - 10:44 pm)

I don't know if there is really a stock answer to this. I once shared office space with a solo attorney who'd been licensed for about 15 years or so, and through a friend, he was hired in-house for Shell's litigation department. This was many years ago, and I believe he's still there.

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vohod (Aug 4, 2017 - 9:23 am)

Hell WFB, JPM, and USBank have public job postings looking for an attorney with 10-15 yrs exp for SVP role.

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loblawyer (Aug 4, 2017 - 8:01 am)

I believe (or at least hope) the window is longer if you're in a niche. Corporate hiring does not seem to be lockstep biglaw though so think there is major YMMV.

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barneystinson (Aug 5, 2017 - 4:57 pm)

I'm dealing with this issue now. I started in-house in my dream job 5 years ago, and while I enjoy the work sometimes, it's extremely stressful w/ long hours (not typical in-house job), and pretty much no advancement opportunity. I handle dozens of different issues daily and don't have a specialty or expert knowledge in any particular area. Starting to get worried about who the hell would want to hire me if I ever do need to move on. Most in-house places want you to specialize in some area (e.g. technology, employment), and I got nothing.

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vohod (Aug 5, 2017 - 5:31 pm)

Look for a government job. Leave that dump. Leave the private sucktor.

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