Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

How to break into mid law

They are less famous than their biglaw competitors, but give mrlollipop08/23/17
You are either connected or they find you. retard08/23/17
What candidates they are looking for, particularly for law s mrlollipop08/23/17
It's going to depend on what they need. Midlaw doesn't typic thirdtierlaw08/23/17
No minimum hours requirement cuts both ways. There is no bar retard08/23/17
It's the same answer to almost everything, other than gettin thirdtierlaw08/23/17
a combination of luck, grit, perseverance, and charm dingbat08/23/17
They usually run ads in your bar's journal and people send i fettywap08/23/17
Get biglaw at oci and then jump, or be connected. triplesix08/23/17
Not sure of the technical definition of midlaw, but I think jd4hire08/23/17
Hang a Harvard Law Degree from your t¡ts.... sanka08/23/17
If you have experience, getting midlaw is easier than biglaw 2breedbares08/23/17
mrlollipop (Aug 23, 2017 - 5:45 am)

They are less famous than their biglaw competitors, but give better work life balance. But how to find these firms and get interviews!

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retard (Aug 23, 2017 - 8:06 am)

You are either connected or they find you.

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mrlollipop (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:15 am)

What candidates they are looking for, particularly for law students.

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thirdtierlaw (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:40 am)

It's going to depend on what they need. Midlaw doesn't typically have "yearly classes" of new hires. So if they're trying to expand their IP department, they'll look for someone who interned at an IP firm who is eligible for the patent bar. Or if they do a lot of environmental litigation, they may look for someone who has an undergrad background or work experience in environmental regulations.

They look for the same thing any other job looks for, bar review, class rank, and past work experience.

I got a midlaw job offer by essentially cold calling partners at firms asking for informational interviews. Met with the partner, had a long conversation about who I was and what he does. Followed up 3 months later with an update on me, thanking him again for all the advice he gave me. Then gave an update right before taking the bar, thanked him again for opening up doors to some other informational interviews, he asked me to come back into the office and meet again. Then he offered me a job.

One thing to be careful of is that midlaw doesn't always provide a better work life balance or the difference may be minimal, i.e. a 60 hour week vs. 70. So if you are networking try to get a real idea of how high the billable hour requirement actually is for the firm. Don't buy the "well we don't have an official billable hour requirement."

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retard (Aug 23, 2017 - 6:45 pm)

No minimum hours requirement cuts both ways. There is no bare minimum to satisfy to qualify for a bonus or to guarantee your safety for another year. You never know exactly where you stand. A minor uptick in business this year might mean that the mimicking the prior year's hours isn't sufficient.

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thirdtierlaw (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:10 am)

It's the same answer to almost everything, other than getting into biglaw, network. Midlaw is this weird place where the same floor can be filled with everyone from a biglaw washout, to a T4 grad who created a powerhouse solo firm with a large book of business.

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dingbat (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:13 am)

a combination of luck, grit, perseverance, and charm

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fettywap (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:22 am)

They usually run ads in your bar's journal and people send in a resume like any other regular job.

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triplesix (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:33 am)

Get biglaw at oci and then jump, or be connected.

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jd4hire (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:49 am)

Not sure of the technical definition of midlaw, but I think I'm in it. To get in at my firm is simply navigating the interview process, which is pretty straightforward. We advertise when we need an associate, the hiring partners review resumes, set up interviews, call back those they like for a second interview with two new partners, select the candidate and invite them to a lunch with a larger group and then make an offer.

I got in by doing the above and am about as happy as one can be under the billable hour. Yesterday I emailed a co-defendant's attorney about some discovery due and I got a "thanks, I'll follow up and by the way, I'm leaving my firm to go in-house." The attorney actually grew up down the street where I currently live, so I responded and told him to stop by next time he's visiting his parents and inquired why he was leaving. He noted that he hates the billable hour and can't stand non-stop client development. That epitomizes my thoughts exactly. I hope to leave the billable hour at some point.

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sanka (Aug 23, 2017 - 9:51 am)

Hang a Harvard Law Degree from your t¡ts....

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2breedbares (Aug 23, 2017 - 12:03 pm)

If you have experience, getting midlaw is easier than biglaw. I also think the quality of life is overstated.

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