Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Lack of attention to detail

Curious on your thoughts. Let's say you have a penchant for ambulancechaser201309/11/17
I think it is a sign of fatigue, multitasking, or being in a uknownvalue09/11/17
could be anything, and in some fields it's more problematic dingbat09/11/17
Everyone has an email snaphu from time to time. If it's an i lawyer209/11/17
You have a typo in this post. "Second letter" vs. "Second l siezetheday09/11/17
Must have been a "snaphu", LoL. wutwutwut09/12/17
Could be anything, but lacking attention to detail seems lik bucwild09/12/17
A rule I learned some years ago: Always double check, no nighthawk09/12/17
The root cause of my typos are fatigue and/or being in a rus isthisit09/12/17
I frequently catch pretty horrible errors in the briefs I re junkwired09/12/17
A lot of times it is really hard to catch your own errors, p downwardslope09/12/17
When I was a law clerk I would add footnotes to orders calli defectoantesto09/12/17
Good advice. I actually ignore most of these errors now, si junkwired09/12/17
Just my two cents from 5+ years at a court... Unless you thi tacocheese09/13/17
I have had this problem. It mostly stems from me wanting to anonattempt09/13/17
ambulancechaser2013 (Sep 11, 2017 - 3:30 pm)

Curious on your thoughts. Let's say you have a penchant for writing an email, you don't catch the mistake the first time but literally a second letter after you re-review it in the send folder you catch the mistake and redo it. Obviously if you are doing high stakes civil it matters. What is that a sign of; you not really caring or a low/lower IQ? Or is it neither.

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uknownvalue (Sep 11, 2017 - 3:33 pm)

I think it is a sign of fatigue, multitasking, or being in a hurry.

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dingbat (Sep 11, 2017 - 4:06 pm)

could be anything, and in some fields it's more problematic than others

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lawyer2 (Sep 11, 2017 - 4:21 pm)

Everyone has an email snaphu from time to time. If it's an interoffice email or even an outside user in an MS Exchange environment, you can rescind it.

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siezetheday (Sep 11, 2017 - 4:37 pm)

You have a typo in this post. "Second letter" vs. "Second later". It means you are going too fast. Slow down man.

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wutwutwut (Sep 12, 2017 - 11:31 am)

Must have been a "snaphu", LoL.

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bucwild (Sep 12, 2017 - 9:10 am)

Could be anything, but lacking attention to detail seems like a major weakness for any litigator.

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nighthawk (Sep 12, 2017 - 9:54 am)

A rule I learned some years ago:

Always double check, no matter what. Make sure the subject line matches the email and the recipients are proper. Look over the email for typos, passive voice, punctuation, and anything else. Take the extra 3 minutes, no matter what. If not, you will end up looking like a fool.

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isthisit (Sep 12, 2017 - 10:45 am)

The root cause of my typos are fatigue and/or being in a rush.

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junkwired (Sep 12, 2017 - 12:16 pm)

I frequently catch pretty horrible errors in the briefs I read as a law clerk. I have an example from this morning. The memorandum of law in support of a defendant's MSJ that I'm currently writing a short order for refers, in one of its arguments, to the incorrect count of the plaintiff's complaint. To make things worse, the reference to the incorrect count is bolded and capitalized. I may add a footnote to the decision making note of the error, even though it isn't fatal. These kinds of errors make the drafting attorney/firm look really sloppy.

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downwardslope (Sep 12, 2017 - 12:24 pm)

A lot of times it is really hard to catch your own errors, particularly if it is something you have been working on for a long time. I prefer to look at something fresh in the morning before submitting it because I usually notice errors.

I have seen opposing briefs where they actually had a prior appellant's name from another similar case still in the brief from cutting and pasting. That is a simple search and replace.

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defectoantesto (Sep 12, 2017 - 12:36 pm)

When I was a law clerk I would add footnotes to orders calling out attorneys' mistakes. The judge always deleted them. I didn't understand why until I litigated for 5 years. It is a miserable existence, with late nights, untelenting deadlines, and thankless clients. Having the court call you out on a minor drafting error in a throwaway motion only makes it harder. The judge understood that, and experience taught me to understand it too. I would urge you to reconsider that footnote.

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junkwired (Sep 12, 2017 - 1:31 pm)

Good advice. I actually ignore most of these errors now, since, as in your experience, the judges I work for care only about the quality of arguments being made, not about minor technical errors. I have decided to bring it up with the judge orally but leave the footnote out for now.

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tacocheese (Sep 13, 2017 - 9:43 am)

Just my two cents from 5+ years at a court... Unless you think the parties or a reviewing court will be concerned about a discrepancy between your opinion and the record, I don't see a good reason to point out obvious errors. These errors are common, and there's no need to chastise. Everyone makes minor mistakes from time to time.

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anonattempt (Sep 13, 2017 - 1:19 pm)

I have had this problem. It mostly stems from me wanting to fire off the email and/or document and get it over with, without carefully re-reading the email or document to check for mistakes. I think the key is to force yourself to carefully review your work, and to not succumb to the "let's just get this over with" mentality.

Also, sometimes what you later think is a mistake isn't actually a mistake. For example, you forget to add some extra statement you later realize/think is important (spoiler alert: it's actually not really that important).

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