Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Follow Ups

Hi all: Thought I'd get some thoughts. In June, I interv htownlaw09/15/17
I'd keep following up every week and a half. You can even sa thirdtierlaw09/15/17
Yeah week and half is not bad. If you're going to continuou jddidtie09/15/17
My rule of thumb as a chill bro is that unless something is jddidtie09/15/17
In some organizations this is a signal that the hiring manag wutwutwut09/15/17
Week and a half sounds about right, and the staggering thing kramer71609/15/17
So, my contact so far has been the lead attorney in the orga htownlaw09/15/17
I would keep talking to the lead attorney. When I got my job kramer71609/15/17
So, an update. Since I last posted, I was offered another htownlaw10/03/17
OP, sounds like they 're just not that into you. If HR is blackholelaw10/03/17
Call and ask for the person you are emailing. You have been kramer71610/03/17
So, the non-profit in question is "the" job for me. I did 1 htownlaw10/03/17
I'd call. If they don't respond within 24 hours take the oth thirdtierlaw10/03/17
Do what you think is right. Me personally, I would call the miketrout10/03/17
Thanks. I'm really just trying to gauge how people who aren htownlaw10/03/17
Just make sure you aren't left without a chair when the musi kramer71610/03/17
I agree with Kramer. I would also add that, if the non-prof miketrout10/03/17
htownlaw (Sep 15, 2017 - 3:36 pm)

Hi all:

Thought I'd get some thoughts. In June, I interviewed at a non-profit. I did a second interview the next week. I was told by my point of contact, back in June, that they would schedule a flight out "shortly." I have followed up periodically since then. The answer, a few times now, has been: sorry for the delay, I'm told by HR they will set something up next week. The most recent "next week" was last week.

My question: how often is it appropriate to shoot them an email? I don't want to pester them, but it has been roughly three months now. My interactions are always encouraging though. It just seems the HR department keeps delaying.

Reply Like (0)
thirdtierlaw (Sep 15, 2017 - 3:40 pm)

I'd keep following up every week and a half. You can even say in the e-mail, "Just making sure I didn't miss the phone call and that you have the correct contact information, I was told 'next week' and I didn't want you to think I wasn't interested if I missed e-mail. Would it better for me to call H.R. directly to set up the appointment?"

Reply Like (0)
jddidtie (Sep 15, 2017 - 3:48 pm)

Yeah week and half is not bad. If you're going to continuously keep pinging them, at least do it staggered so no ones thinking "oh man it's Monday, time for this guys weekly email."

Reply Like (0)
jddidtie (Sep 15, 2017 - 3:45 pm)

My rule of thumb as a chill bro is that unless something is especially desperate or pressing to me, I allow people up to twice the amount of time they estimated they needed to do whatever before I start poking them.

If they don't give me a set time, I will follow up intermittently with such communications occurring coincident with some other thing that signals a great passing of time. For example, if it's something I think would take a week, I bother them when it's a new month. If it's something I think would take a day, I bother them when it's a new week.

Reply Like (0)
wutwutwut (Sep 15, 2017 - 3:56 pm)

In some organizations this is a signal that the hiring manager, HR, and finance are not yet completely aligned on the comp elements, and while they're getting that ironed out don't want to be flying in candidates.

Even moderately sized organizations can take like forever to get their crap together, especially if there's not a forceful personality type pushing things through.

Reply Like (0)
kramer716 (Sep 15, 2017 - 4:00 pm)

Week and a half sounds about right, and the staggering thing is a good suggestion.

Reply Like (0)
htownlaw (Sep 15, 2017 - 4:24 pm)

So, my contact so far has been the lead attorney in the organization's division. I have not touched base with HR for awhile now (HR set up the first two). Would it be better to reach out to HR for the first time since July or so? Or should I continue communication with the lead attorney?

FWIW, I asked if the delay was related to any doubts about me, and the lead attorney assured me it wasn't. He makes it seem as if they are definitely planning to eventually bring me down. But time has a way of making you worry things have changed.

I'm thinking of reaching out Monday rather than now (the end of the week).

Reply Like (0)
kramer716 (Sep 15, 2017 - 5:05 pm)

I would keep talking to the lead attorney. When I got my job on Guam I was emailing one of the senior attorneys repeatedly. She harassed HR on my behalf to get me hired.

Since you are being hired by a non-profit they may have a ton of hoops to jump through to get approval for funding to hire you. I was almost hired for a legal aid office on Guam, and what took them was they needed to get the Board of Directors to approve me and that took a while.

Reply Like (0)
htownlaw (Oct 3, 2017 - 12:36 pm)

So, an update.

Since I last posted, I was offered another job that I didn't apply for (this is a job I would want if the above referenced one falls through), but that I needed to answer them within a week. I sent an email to the lead attorney telling him about this and asking where things stood, but he did not respond. This is unique because he typically responds quickly. Because my interactions had been so positive, I decided to tell the offering job that I couldn't make a decision on their timeline because of the opportunity with this non-profit. Amazingly, they were understanding and said they *may* hold off on their decisions. I again emailed the lead attorney telling him that I wouldn't take the job so long as their job is on the table. That was Friday, and again no response.

Since he did not answer either email, do you all think that door has closed? Again, he had told me a few times that HR would reach out "soon" to schedule a flight and that he was frustrated with HR for holding things up. Up until now, I had no reason to believe that would not happen. Should I place a phone call (rather than email) if a few more days go by?

Reply Like (0)
blackholelaw (Oct 3, 2017 - 12:47 pm)

OP, sounds like they 're just not that into you. If HR is giving you the silent treatment and you don't even work there yet, it may be even worse once you're on the other side.

Take the job you are offered and don't look back.

Reply Like (0)
kramer716 (Oct 3, 2017 - 1:28 pm)

Call and ask for the person you are emailing. You have been loyal to the potential employer, but it seems that loyalty was not reciprocated to you.

It would seem the new employer really wants you, so I would go with them.

Reply Like (0)
htownlaw (Oct 3, 2017 - 1:46 pm)

So, the non-profit in question is "the" job for me. I did 1L summer with them. I know the culture and have several connections within the organization. Frankly, I'm very surprised I'm getting the silent treatment. I would have already accepted the other offer if that were not the case.

I do understand what both of you are saying though. Dragging out and then not responding to emails doesn't look good. Hopefully he's just got a two week trial or something.

I think my question is whether the call would look desperate or determined. Even if I don't get it this go around, I don't want to alienate myself.

Reply Like (0)
thirdtierlaw (Oct 3, 2017 - 3:27 pm)

I'd call. If they don't respond within 24 hours take the other job. DO NOT start making excuses for the nonprofit. They could have been actively trying to recruit their "first choice" but want to keep you on the hook. The funding may have fallen through and they are scrambling to find more. They could just be terrible people. You'll never know.

But you have another job, that you would want, already lined up. They recruited you, they want you, and they are even being cool about giving you time. It seems like an easy choice if the nonprofit can't even be bothered to respond when you're about to walk away.

Reply Like (0)
miketrout (Oct 3, 2017 - 3:23 pm)

Do what you think is right. Me personally, I would call the lead attorney and see if you can get a response.

If you don't get a response, or the response you do get is less than 100% positive, take the new offer. A bird in hand is worth 2 in the bush.

Do what you think is best, but that's my $.02.

Reply Like (0)
htownlaw (Oct 3, 2017 - 3:25 pm)

Thanks. I'm really just trying to gauge how people who aren't emotionally invested would handle it. I will do what I think is best, of course, but I do appreciate the feedback from all of you.

Reply Like (0)
kramer716 (Oct 3, 2017 - 3:33 pm)

Just make sure you aren't left without a chair when the music stops. I would say a call now makes you look interested in the position, but even if you come off as desperate to them, who cares? They have given you no other choice.

As was said by people here, do not turn down the guaranteed job unless you get 100% assurances from the original non-profit. Go where you are wanted.

By 100% assurance I mean make sure they have skin in the game. Apparently, that means for you that they need to get you a ticket. I don't mean hearing crap from them about how they still really want you, and you just need to wait a few more days before they can purchase the ticket or process your paperwork. It should be put up or shut up time for the non-profit.

Reply Like (0)
miketrout (Oct 3, 2017 - 3:46 pm)

I agree with Kramer. I would also add that, if the non-profit falls through, and even though the non-profit is your first choice, there is something to be said about working for an employer that actively recruited and wants you. It sounds like you will be valued there.

Reply Like (0)
Post a message in this thread