Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Tough on issues, soft on people

This is my civil litigation style. Note I did not come up wi ambulancechaser201310/03/17
That is pretty similar to my style as well. I do family and thirdtierlaw10/03/17
Being rude and obnoxious to opposing counsel is a sign of fe guyingorillasuit10/04/17
My style as well. As to the "point" I do think it matters. jd4hire10/04/17
It's also been my experience that most experienced attorneys thirdtierlaw10/04/17
ambulancechaser2013 (Oct 3, 2017 - 8:18 pm)

This is my civil litigation style. Note I did not come up with that line.

In any case, it’s pretty self explanatory: zealous advocate but with polite, professional demeanor. When it does not negatively impact my client, I’ll accommodate etc
I’ll give you 2 maybe 3 extensions to respond to discovery (mutual extensions of course) but I won’t move a physical examination if it impacts the discovery cut off etc. I won’t be shrill in my moving papers, oppositions, or replies but I will tear you a new one through logical arguments in court.

Here is my point. Does it even matter? I mean if you win and are you are effective won’t the other side still hate you and not give you any quarter?

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thirdtierlaw (Oct 3, 2017 - 9:08 pm)

That is pretty similar to my style as well. I do family and crim law, so sometimes I need to be absolutely vicious at trial or contested hearing. Much less often in a family court, but some occasions it is called for.

Outside the court room I'm the nicest guy you'll meet, especially during depositions.

It's an adversarial process, but I've never understood attorneys who are jerks to opposing counsel. It achieves nothing but makes everyone else's life more difficult.

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guyingorillasuit (Oct 4, 2017 - 2:22 am)

Being rude and obnoxious to opposing counsel is a sign of fear and insecurity. On top of that, judges hate it. Some jerk attorneys reserve the bully attitude for lawyers coming from outside of their home county, because they think they can get away with it.

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jd4hire (Oct 4, 2017 - 9:15 am)

My style as well. As to the "point" I do think it matters. I work in a small bar. There is an amazingly successful plaintiff's attorney who is the biggest deek I know. Who gloats on it and he has done well for himself, but even his partners have said things to me such as "don't call him, he's an a$$, call me if you need anything on this case."

I think reasonable individuals respect when they've fought the good fight and have lost to another who has put up a good fight and won. I was out with my old boss at some event and an attorney came up and did a close handshake and whispered something in his ear. My boss laughed and later explained that they had a huge case 25 years earlier where my boss got a defense verdict. The PI atty would always congratulate my boss and make some joke about the case and how his life would have been different had he won.

Last example - there's an eccentric plaintiff's attorney who is extremely smart and a very skilled attorney. He'll take a crap case and manage to squeeze 6 digits out all day long. The defense bar loves and fears this guy. People get a kick out of him and he's courteous in all aspects of litigation. When an event with consequences is set to occur, he'll strike with precision.

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thirdtierlaw (Oct 4, 2017 - 11:39 am)

It's also been my experience that most experienced attorneys do not hold grudges because they lost. If you're cool with them about it, typically it is water under the bridge or they'll even tip their hat to you for your work.

Being a jerk to them throughout the process is a completely different story.

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