Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Does this annoy anyone else?

When someone (especially another attorney) addresses you as mcacollector10/06/17
It doesn't bug me, but can add that it's fairly common usag jackofspeed10/06/17
Haven't had that happen. One guy always referred to me as " dogdaypm10/06/17
It's how the criminal court addresses attorneys in 3 of the thirdtierlaw10/06/17
I suspect that's typically done in high-volume businesses th therewillbeblood10/06/17
Rather you rather be addressed as Esquire or your Lordship? trijocker10/06/17
Address me as "Maestro". wutwutwut10/06/17
Just address me by my first name. When I call up opposing c pauperesq10/06/17
I don't know who wins the name contest, doctors or lawyers? sanka10/06/17
Doesn't bother me. It sure beats "esquire" IMHO. onehell10/06/17
Your Excellency? guyingorillasuit10/06/17
Most recently, it was from another attorney, not some random mcacollector10/06/17
My name is Christopher, and for some reason one of the peopl kramer71610/06/17
It can be a cultural thing. Some cultures are very big on h bittersweet10/10/17
mcacollector (Oct 6, 2017 - 11:24 am)

When someone (especially another attorney) addresses you as “Attorney Last Name”.

I have no idea why this sets me off but it annoys me almost as much as when people use the wrong “your” or “you’re”... almost.

Just call me Ms. so and so.

#endrant Happy Friday to all!

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jackofspeed (Oct 6, 2017 - 12:23 pm)

It doesn't bug me, but can add that it's fairly common usage in PA.

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dogdaypm (Oct 6, 2017 - 12:18 pm)

Haven't had that happen. One guy always referred to me as "Colonel Lastname", explaining that it was a common honorific for lawyers ("at least the good ones") wherever it was that he was from. As a former non-com that really grated on me and I had to ask him to stop doing it several times, and explain why it bothered me, before he really got the message.

Another guy always referred to me as "Doctor Lastname". He only quit after I started parroting that back to him (a PhD, he didn't like arrogating the title "Doctor" to himself, either, and didn't think much of other PhDs who insisted on it).

A real doctor (orthopedic surgeon) that I had to see about 80 times due to a bad injury always greeted me with "Counselor Lastname!". Kinda liked that one.

Happy Friday!

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thirdtierlaw (Oct 6, 2017 - 12:22 pm)

It's how the criminal court addresses attorneys in 3 of the courts I practice in. It doesn't bother me. It does sound a little weird if we are talking outside the court and it's used in that way.

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therewillbeblood (Oct 6, 2017 - 12:31 pm)

I suspect that's typically done in high-volume businesses that deal with both lawyers and non-lawyers a lot (e.g. debt collection), so whoever's dealing with the next person on the list knows whether it's an attorney or not.

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trijocker (Oct 6, 2017 - 1:26 pm)

Rather you rather be addressed as Esquire or your Lordship?

Or would a plain Mr or Ms be better.

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wutwutwut (Oct 6, 2017 - 2:56 pm)

Address me as "Maestro".

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pauperesq (Oct 6, 2017 - 3:20 pm)

Just address me by my first name. When I call up opposing counsel, I don't call him "Attorney Dave."

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sanka (Oct 6, 2017 - 2:04 pm)

I don't know who wins the name contest, doctors or lawyers?

Monty Python cogently illustrates this finer point of common law and practice.......

The nose.
(A man sitting behind a desk in a Harley Street consulting room. Close-up of the name plate on desk in front of him. Although the camera does not reveal this for a moment, this name plate, about two inches high, continues all along the desk, off the side of it at the same height and halfway round the room. We start to track along this name plate on which is written: 'Professor Sir Adrian Furrows F.R.S. F.R.C.S. F.R.C.P. M.D.M.S. (Oxon), Mall Ph.D., M. Se. (Cantab), Ph.D. (Syd), ER.G.S., F.R.C.O.G., F. FM.R.C.S., M.S. (Birm), M.S. (Liv), M.S. (Guadalahara), M.S. (Karach), M.S. (Edin), B.A. (Chic), B. Litt. (Phil), D. Litt (Phil), D. Litt (Arthur and Lucy), D. Litt (Ottawa), D. Litt (All other places in Canada except Medicine Hat, B. Sc. 9 Brussels, Liege, Antwerp, Asse, (and Grower) '. There is a knock on the door.)
Specialist: Come in.
(The door opens and Raymond Luxury Yacht enters. He cannot walk straight to the desk as his passage is barred by the strip of wood carrying the degrees, but he discovers the special hinged part of it that opens like a door. Mr Luxury Yacht has his enormous polystyrene nose. It is a foot long.)
Specialist: Ah! Mr Luxury Yacht. Do sit down, please.
Mr Luxury Yacht: Ah, no, no. My name is spelt 'Luxury Yacht' but it's pronounced 'Throatwobbler Mangrove'.
Specialist: Well, do sit down then Mr Throatwobbler Mangrove.
Mr Luxury Yacht: Thank you.

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onehell (Oct 6, 2017 - 2:26 pm)

Doesn't bother me. It sure beats "esquire" IMHO.

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guyingorillasuit (Oct 6, 2017 - 3:32 pm)

Your Excellency?

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mcacollector (Oct 6, 2017 - 6:33 pm)

Most recently, it was from another attorney, not some random debtor or something, and it was used to try to bully/ condescend to me. I also have a long last name so it just sounds weird. No one in NY addresses people like that, so maybe it’s a regional thing (this person was from another state).

Frankly, not sure why no one calls me “Queen Tara, Master of frozen bank accounts and destroyer of small businesses...?” Is it so much to ask for a little respect? Jeez.

Jk. I really just prefer “Ms. Last Name” or Tara.

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kramer716 (Oct 6, 2017 - 7:09 pm)

My name is Christopher, and for some reason one of the people in our admin office used to call me Christ. No idea why, but I will take it.

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bittersweet (Oct 10, 2017 - 5:03 pm)

It can be a cultural thing. Some cultures are very big on honorific titles (like Germans). It can also be common in many African American subcultures in the US.

It has happened to me, by clients and attorneys. But I've found that certain backgrounds make it more common. Often if an attorney is addressing you that way, they may want to be addressed that way as well. If you need to work with them on good terms, take the hint.

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