Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

0l In Need Of Help

Alright, here is the situation. I'm 24 years old and will be tolawschool10/14/17
Don’t go to law school. But if you feel you must, at the v lawst10/15/17
Hey! Thanks for the input. I just had another user on this tolawschool10/16/17
haha, good answer, thanks for making me smile this afternoon inho2solo10/16/17
ID delay taking it. Getting your gpa up by focusing on that notreallyalawyer10/14/17
Yeah, thats the way I’m leaning. I guess I’m concerned w tolawschool10/14/17
If you’re this freaked out over taking the LSAT, you’ll qdllc10/14/17
I found the bar exam a lot easier than the lsat notreallyalawyer10/14/17
I wouldn’t necessarily say I’m freaking out but I get yo tolawschool10/14/17
OP, you are right to recognize the importance of the LSAT. brassica710/14/17
Thank you! I highly appreciate your input. I feel this is th tolawschool10/14/17
Law schools don't care where you worked while in undergrad o jeffm10/15/17
I apologize. I meant as in the gap year between undergrad an tolawschool10/15/17
They don't care about that, either. Schools admit like th jeffm10/15/17
Ok, awesome. I appreciate the input. tolawschool10/15/17
Yes there will be some delay if you wait. But I don't think orgdonor10/14/17
Focus on the grades now and make sure they don't slip. Hold wutwutwut10/14/17
Yeah, I’m leaning towards taking my time for the LSAT. tolawschool10/15/17
Danged phone, double/triple. wutwutwut10/14/17
Danged phone, double/triple. wutwutwut10/14/17
Focus on getting the best grades you can until you graduate. spaghetti10/15/17
Thats what I figured! Thanks a lot! tolawschool10/16/17
a 170 LSAT +performing well on 13 courses + the application xstockholmsynhostag10/15/17
Hey! I appreciate your input and I will actually check out tolawschool10/16/17
Campos book is a starting place, but the ending place for yo xstockholmsynhostag10/15/17
Just take the LSAT in december, knowing that you're going to dingbat10/16/17
Unless you have a way to GUARANTY you have a decent paying j bittersweet10/17/17
Re-read the first part of the first response in this thread bobloblaw774910/18/17
Hey! Thanks for the response. I appreciate it. "If you ge tolawschool10/18/17
Don't go to law school. You posted the question on JDU, the nighthawk10/18/17
LOL I might do that. tolawschool10/18/17
Take the LSAT in June. If you're overwhelmed, it's not going anothernjlawyer10/24/17
I only read your first post OP, and nothing in the middle. T esquire13810/30/17

tolawschool (Oct 14, 2017 - 12:38 pm)

Alright, here is the situation. I'm 24 years old and will be finishing up my bachelor's degree in May of 2018 (switching majors while taking some time off from school). With that being said, I am taking 13 courses between this Fall semester and the Spring semester coming up ALL while studying for the LSAT in December. I purchased the 10 week LawSchooli study guide and I'm not going to lie - I'm starting to feel overwhelmed. I know the importance of the LSAT but for me, personally, it takes on a whole new meaning. Due to screwing up early on in my academic career which will result in a poor LSAC GPA - I must nail the LSAT. With that being said, I'm hoping that with an LSAT of 170+ plus an enormous upward trend in grades as I have gotten nothing but A's as of late and will continue to do so in this Fall semester as well as the Spring semester, I will have the possibility of getting into a T14 school or a regional school with $$$. That is why I ask of all you - Should I take the LSAT in December with hopes of getting into law school beginning next year? OR should I aim for the June LSAT which will allow me to take my time studying and grasp the material better? The latter option will mean I am starting law school at the age of 25 which kind of bothers me..

I appreciate any advice you all have! Thanks!

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lawst (Oct 15, 2017 - 7:30 pm)

Don’t go to law school. But if you feel you must, at the very least intern at a law office as a runner or some sort of clerical position first. Find out what the actual practice of law is like and then decide if it’s right for you. If you do that and decide it’s the right thing, then go for it. Oh and read these first: http://esqnever.blogspot.com/2010/07/calico-cat.html?m=1. https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB115103273756588503 (Law School by Default).

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tolawschool (Oct 16, 2017 - 9:05 am)

Hey!
Thanks for the input. I just had another user on this post mention to not go to law school. It is definitely a difficult decision.

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inho2solo (Oct 16, 2017 - 4:22 pm)

haha, good answer, thanks for making me smile this afternoon!

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 14, 2017 - 12:46 pm)

ID delay taking it. Getting your gpa up by focusing on that will only help your odds

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tolawschool (Oct 14, 2017 - 1:23 pm)

Yeah, thats the way I’m leaning. I guess I’m concerned with my career being delayed.. But I think it is in the best interest going forward.

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qdllc (Oct 14, 2017 - 12:59 pm)

If you’re this freaked out over taking the LSAT, you’ll hate being a lawyer.

The bar exam makes the LSAT look like tea and cake, and the actual practice of law can make everything before look like a frat party.

Do you have anything solid so you know becoming a lawyer will be with it?

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 14, 2017 - 1:10 pm)

I found the bar exam a lot easier than the lsat

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tolawschool (Oct 14, 2017 - 1:28 pm)

I wouldn’t necessarily say I’m freaking out but I get your point. I guess I’m just worried that starting law school at the age of 25 is somehow much worst than 24..

Besides the whole “I want to make a difference” thing, I feel I have the personality for law. I love the grind, I’m very self-disciplined, and just feel I can be an effective lawyer.

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brassica7 (Oct 14, 2017 - 1:37 pm)

OP, you are right to recognize the importance of the LSAT. If you do not have the time now to study properly, it is better to delay taking this test. My advice is to focus on getting good grades in your last year of college (you can't improve your grades after you graduate, obviously), then focus on getting your LSAT up. A high LSAT score can net you a lot of scholarships, or mean the difference between going to a school where most graduates get good jobs versus going to a school where most graduates struggle. It's worth delaying a year to do it right.

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tolawschool (Oct 14, 2017 - 1:42 pm)

Thank you! I highly appreciate your input. I feel this is the best option regarding both GPA and LSAT. Also, I will be able to work for a year after graduating which I hope would help with law school admission. With that being said, are you aware of any jobs law schools would like to see an applicant’s resume? Anything in particular?

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jeffm (Oct 15, 2017 - 10:12 am)

Law schools don't care where you worked while in undergrad or earlier.

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tolawschool (Oct 15, 2017 - 10:25 am)

I apologize. I meant as in the gap year between undergrad and law school.

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jeffm (Oct 15, 2017 - 10:55 am)

They don't care about that, either.

Schools admit like this:

1. Auto admits: Some formula of your GPA + LSAT. If your combination is high enough, you're in. Nothing else matters.

2. Auto rejects: Your combination is so bad, they will never give you a 2nd look.

3. 2nd looks. If, and only if, not enough auto admits accepted the school's offer to fill all the seats, the school goes to it's 2nd-look pile. There, they will consider other factors. Who your parents are, important political connections, etc. I doubt being a paralegal will influence this process, but you never know. Go volunteer for an esteemed local politician if you want to leverage this possibility.

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tolawschool (Oct 15, 2017 - 11:18 am)

Ok, awesome. I appreciate the input.

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orgdonor (Oct 14, 2017 - 4:23 pm)

Yes there will be some delay if you wait. But I don't think it matters much. Try and get a job as a parallel or legal assistant while you study. You'll have to get top grades while you're in school - and since your cohort will all be similar intellectually, two things: hard work and prior knowledge of the "big picture" can distinguish you in your class.

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wutwutwut (Oct 14, 2017 - 11:58 pm)

Focus on the grades now and make sure they don't slip. Hold off on lsat until you have time to devote to it. There's literally zip squat nada diff between starting LS at 24 vice 25.

To one of your other questions, I don't think any job you might get will impress an admit committe. But volunteering might. How many Habitat houses have you helped build?

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tolawschool (Oct 15, 2017 - 11:19 am)

Yeah, I’m leaning towards taking my time for the LSAT.

As far as building houses, nada.

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wutwutwut (Oct 14, 2017 - 11:58 pm)

Danged phone, double/triple.

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wutwutwut (Oct 14, 2017 - 11:58 pm)

Danged phone, double/triple.

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spaghetti (Oct 15, 2017 - 2:21 pm)

Focus on getting the best grades you can until you graduate.

Take as much time as you possibly can to get the best score on the LSAT that you can. Every point increase is worth the effort. Breaking 170 will open up a lot more doors than are shut by being 28-30 when you graduate.

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tolawschool (Oct 16, 2017 - 9:03 am)

Thats what I figured! Thanks a lot!

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xstockholmsynhostag (Oct 15, 2017 - 4:44 pm)

a 170 LSAT +performing well on 13 courses + the application process is unlikely to happen simultaneously.

have you read Campos' book?

I would aim for at least 3-4 years of work experience, and fluency in a major language, such as Japanese, before matriculating.

( There are probably 10-20 terrific reasons for you not to earn a JD, and you may stumble upon one during this evaluation period, and decide not to ignore the data why you should avoid the JDIC --JD Industrial Complex--b/c you are just different/work harder etc

only pay full fare, at HYS. Your risks of failure increase exponentially ranked worse than the top 7 law schools.

Socio-economic trends don't favor new JDs eg AI, automation, 2008 crisis no2, disdain for lawyers, corporations scrutinizing their legal bills ever closely

should you decide not to pursue a JD, it is unlikely to determine the fate of the USA or the World. (Or Apple vs Samsung IP disputes). The JDIC--JD Industrial Complex--will recruit/flatter some other some person as efficiently as Harvey W has had his way with aspiring actresses. Those actresses may have forgettable sex, but most JDs emerge from JDIC with unforgettable and unforgiveable (in this world) student debts. Let us hope that you don't fall into either trap.

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tolawschool (Oct 16, 2017 - 9:03 am)

Hey!
I appreciate your input and I will actually check out the book you mentioned. I'm well aware of the risk associated with law school and what it entails. Trust me, I think about it frequently throughout the day. There are those whom say law school is definitely worth it, in certain circumstances, and then there are those whom are totally against it..

I read the short, free introduction of Campos' book online just now and it does look interesting - especially because it is from a law professor and he is not bias in anyway.

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xstockholmsynhostag (Oct 15, 2017 - 5:00 pm)

Campos book is a starting place, but the ending place for your research for this life-shattering/changing decision

https://www.amazon.com/Dont-Law-School-Unless-Opportunity-ebook/dp/B009D13IA6/ref=la_B001H6QH1C_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1508100691&sr=1-1

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dingbat (Oct 16, 2017 - 4:33 pm)

Just take the LSAT in december, knowing that you're going to retake in March AND in June.

Don't ever accept your results on the LSAT, always try to do that little bit better.

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bittersweet (Oct 17, 2017 - 4:55 pm)

Unless you have a way to GUARANTY you have a decent paying job upon graduation, AND for several years afterward, I'd advise against it.

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bobloblaw7749 (Oct 18, 2017 - 7:12 am)

Re-read the first part of the first response in this thread ("Dont go to law school"). It makes me sad when I read these stories about pre-law students, law students or even first year lawyers who say they "love the grind". You don't even know what the grind is yet. The grind is not studying for ungrad exams, law school schools or even doing doc review as a 1st year lawyer. The real grind starts when you are a 5th year lawyer and you have partners loading you with work, junior lawyers constantly needing your help, you starting to think about business development, and whatever other personal stuff you have going on.

I don't care if you end up pulling a 180 on the LSAT -- really think about going to law school and becoming a lawyer. If you get a free ride somewhere, it may be worth it; otherwise, I would look hard into other careers.

***All of the above coming from a '09 law school/biglaw transactional lawyer.

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tolawschool (Oct 18, 2017 - 10:48 am)

Hey! Thanks for the response. I appreciate it.

"If you get a free ride somewhere, it may be worth it"
That is the goal. I will be taking the LSAT in June - therefore, this will allow me to take my time studying and to grasp the material. If I score well-enough to receive a full-ride or well near a full-ride, I possibly may go. That is the only scenario that I would go like you stated.

If you don't mind me asking, did you go to a regional school or T14?

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nighthawk (Oct 18, 2017 - 11:14 am)

Don't go to law school. You posted the question on JDU, the most negative place out there. If you posted on this site then you clearly have limited critical thinking skills so law school is definitely not for you. Try getting a job mowing lawns or plunging toilets.

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tolawschool (Oct 18, 2017 - 11:24 am)

LOL I might do that.

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anothernjlawyer (Oct 24, 2017 - 12:09 pm)

Take the LSAT in June. If you're overwhelmed, it's not going to help your score, or your grades, which may, depending on your ultimate career trajectory, be most important in the long run.

As with everyone else, going to law school is a poor risk to take unless you can answer "yes" to at least two of the following three questions:

1) You got into HYS.

2) You have the ability to graduate with less than 75-100K in total debt (this includes situations where your current employer is sponsoring you to go to law school).

3) You have a close relative (i.e., a parent) who can guarantee you a paying lawyer job upon graduation / bar passage, or your current employer wants you to go to ascend the promotional ladder.

If you can't answer "yes" to 2 of 3, and still go to law school, it doesn't matter how much you "love the grind," there's a statistically significant risk that the rest of your life will suck.

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esquire138 (Oct 30, 2017 - 8:48 pm)

I only read your first post OP, and nothing in the middle. That being said, sit the LSAT. See how you do. Go from there. You might ace the thing. You might bomb it. Find out.

25 isn't that old. I was in the military first, so I was........lets just say older than that.

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