Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Why is a law degree a scarlet letter for those seeking a career change?

Employers think you want more money? Can’t you just say in notreallyalawyer10/29/17
Nobody likes lawyers. Also our skills aren't readily transfe bucwild10/29/17
Others will no doubt be more articulate, but I've seen sever toooldtocare10/29/17
Could i bring this to my advantage my say telling a lawyer j notreallyalawyer10/29/17
That won't get you any points with anyone, and remember that toooldtocare10/29/17
1. People hate lawyers 2. Employers generally believe that hairypalms10/29/17
For someone like me who has only done doc review, how could notreallyalawyer10/29/17
Non-legal employers have zero knowledge of doc review v. Big toooldtocare10/29/17
So if they don't care or worry about the legal profession ho notreallyalawyer10/29/17
My experience is limited to a control group of one, but here toooldtocare10/29/17
What would be a good response for why you wouldn't want a la notreallyalawyer10/29/17
Yes, people go through multiple career changes, but often th toooldtocare10/29/17
at this point, anything that would make me marketable, so I notreallyalawyer10/29/17
Not sure I've been much help so a couple of points and I'm d toooldtocare10/29/17
Meant just the knowledge knowing I'm marketable in a field w notreallyalawyer10/29/17
a quarter million dollars, I remember watching reruns of the esquire13810/29/17
also lawyers are notoriously/famously risk adverse. They ar thecharmingmresq10/29/17
Yep. That’s a Catch-22. In one sense we’re litigious ( qdllc10/29/17
Calling a JD a "scarlet letter" is a bit much. However, all patenttrollnj10/29/17
You can easily say too that a law degree doesn't even teach notreallyalawyer10/29/17
Well, it's like I said, the law degree is a "worthless piece patenttrollnj10/29/17
Hehe. I had law review, was top 5% in my class, articles edi notreallyalawyer10/29/17
Oh, so you're in my boat ... LOL patenttrollnj10/29/17
The reason your stats didn't help you is because you have ot junkwired10/31/17
hi every one i am new here in this community. best regard prempal11/19/17
I've had employers tell me they have hired lawyers in the pa fettywap10/29/17
Oh God, you got to watch out for these legal assistants. patenttrollnj10/30/17
Honestly, this issue extends well beyond the legal realm. Mo mrtor10/30/17
Very true. Unfortunately, there really aren't too many patenttrollnj10/30/17
JD preferred tends to be docreview, and working at callcente esquire13810/30/17
Yup, those are the more realistic "JD preferred" jobs out th patenttrollnj10/30/17
This... ironically JD is only an asset for a quasi legal job triplesix10/30/17
I actually just transitioned from insurance defense to healt mrtor10/31/17
Do you think that can be done if one's so called legal exper notreallyalawyer10/31/17
It would be tough with only doc review. Many people do not u mrtor10/31/17
I'm now considering more education, though unsure of what fi notreallyalawyer10/31/17
Those they probably don't count for squat, libraries offer f notreallyalawyer10/31/17
Not sure how much those contract review positions pay, but y mrtor10/31/17
I've considered that, especially Radiology technician. I hop notreallyalawyer10/31/17
That's a good thing you were able to transition into this fi patenttrollnj10/31/17
notreallawyer: for the last month or so of your voluminous p williamdrayton10/30/17
If I recall correctly he/she posted recently that they were esquire13810/30/17
that's someone else wolfman10/31/17
are you the guy on reddit who sent me a message? notreallyalawyer10/31/17
no - I don't use reddit. but if you want some basic informat williamdrayton10/31/17
Thanks, just give me a bit to create a throwaway email accou notreallyalawyer10/31/17
Have you considered becoming a coder/web developer? There ar burneremail10/31/17
I'm terrible at things math/science related. I took pascal i notreallyalawyer10/31/17
Basic html is so frickin easy i really don’t even know wha burneremail10/31/17
Is coding different than programming? When I hear coding I a notreallyalawyer10/31/17
Same thing although programming could imply sometbing higher triplesix10/31/17
Ugh, I looked up my local community college's Radiology prog notreallyalawyer10/31/17
It's not the end of the world to have to take a biology clas patenttrollnj10/31/17
The community college got back to me, there's 4 classes I'd notreallyalawyer10/31/17
Just perusing local listings makes me think there are no "ba mrtor11/01/17
It would be well worth it. You may even be able to take thos mrtor10/31/17
Have you ever thought of trying your hand at Accountancy? superfly00010/31/17

notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 9:47 am)

Employers think you want more money? Can’t you just say in your cover letter how much you want a career change and to not be a lawyer anymore?

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bucwild (Oct 29, 2017 - 11:12 am)

Nobody likes lawyers. Also our skills aren't readily transferable to most other careers. And if they are, there is someone who can likely do the job better, for less money.

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toooldtocare (Oct 29, 2017 - 11:26 am)

Others will no doubt be more articulate, but I've seen several problems:
1. As noted above, nobody likes lawyers, so why bring one into the office?
2. Everyone knows that lawyers make a ton of money/are rich, so why would a lawyer want this job? Clearly, there must be something wrong with you.
3. Since lawyers make a lot of money/are rich, you'll take this job and then quit when one of those extremely high-paying lawyer jobs becomes available.
4. YOu must be up to something...not sure what, but why would a lawyer who is rich/can make a lot of money want this job. Not sure what, but you are up to something, and I, as your prospective employer, don't want to find out what your treachery is so won't hire you.
Not meant to be an exhaustive list....

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 11:43 am)

Could i bring this to my advantage my say telling a lawyer joke in a cover letter, then let them know how much I dislike lawyers too and want to do something else?

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toooldtocare (Oct 29, 2017 - 12:38 pm)

That won't get you any points with anyone, and remember that humor is incredibly subjective. The HR chief may have a beloved grandfather who was a lawyer; who knows? Humor, especially at the expense of other(in this case, actual practicing lawyers) is a risk not worth taking in a cover letter, or in an interview.
The only possible way to use it would be to somehow tie the "education" of the JD into the line of work you're trying to enter. I'm told there are areas of compliance in which this can be done, but I have had no success in that regard, but others here may have.

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hairypalms (Oct 29, 2017 - 11:30 am)

1. People hate lawyers
2. Employers generally believe that lawyers are overly litigious
3. Employers believe that if they give you (the lawyer) a job, you will leave shortly thereafter for that six-figure law job.
4. Employers will likely view a lawyer as requesting too much compensation for a non-lawyer job
5. If a lawyer is looking to leave the law, the employer surmises they must not have been very good. Thus, why should I (the employer) hire a "loser."
6. If a lawyer takes a non-law position, the employer may (rightfully) expect that the lawyer will be a "know-it-all" and disrupt the cohesiveness of the work environment.
7. People hate lawyers.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 11:44 am)

For someone like me who has only done doc review, how could they possibly think I'd even have a chance to get a high paying lawyer job, let alone actually want it?

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toooldtocare (Oct 29, 2017 - 12:39 pm)

Non-legal employers have zero knowledge of doc review v. BigLaw, or anything else law related; why should they? They're hiring for x, and don't have time to worry, or care about, the legal profession.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 1:11 pm)

So if they don't care or worry about the legal profession how is it a scarlet letter? Lots of people make career changes.

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toooldtocare (Oct 29, 2017 - 1:35 pm)

My experience is limited to a control group of one, but here's why:
First, you've spent three years and $$$ to get a law degree...but you don't want to use it.
Why? If you've got a good answer for that, then you're in good shape.
Second-and you can blame whomever you want for this-the popular notion is that lawyers are rich and the life of a lawyer is glamorous, so why would you want to leave that behind? The only answer is that there must be something wrong with you.
And I'm not saying this is right or moral or good; I'm just saying this is my experience. There may be others who have moved into jobs out of the legal profession who can give you advice on how to do it. I can't because I haven't figured out how to.
One exception: I have learned that if you go back to school and get a different degree, that may be treated as a true career change. For example, I had a friend who got a master's in teaching after practicing law for a few years. After getting the degree, he had no trouble landing a job as a teacher of HS Spanish, but keep in mind he had gone the whole route: did the internship, got the MAT, had a practical in demand area(foreign language) and spent the time and $$$ to get the degree. Getting this teaching degree made it clear to employers he was done being a lawyer, and if it came up in interviews, that's what he said.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 1:38 pm)

What would be a good response for why you wouldn't want a law degree? If I say I hate law then they might say "what's to say you won't hate this field"? Then I could go into the horrible truths about law, but is that wise?

it just seems many people go through not one, but multiple career changes, but for us, it's held against us if we realize that law sucks. This has been the last 18 years of my life. It's not like I just came out of law school and suddenly tried to make a career change.

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toooldtocare (Oct 29, 2017 - 1:53 pm)

Yes, people go through multiple career changes, but often that involves getting retraining for the new field-e.g. becoming a teacher. I know several ex-lawyers who are now teachers-but all had to go back and get a teaching certificate(via a master's program). This costs time and money.
More specifically, what career change are you anticipating? If you've got the underlying training/skills, then maybe you can finesse the law degree. In my case, I'm a liberal artist, so even trying to move into engineering/computers/healthcare is impossible, because I don't have skills/training in those fields.
Probably the biggest canard for my generation of attorneys was "You can do anything with a law degree." No, you can't-you can practice law, period full stop. Unless of course you have some other underlying skill(and again, I've been told that JDs are good for compliance jobs, but I have had no luck in that regard, and believe me I've tried).
So it all depends on what job you're trying to get, and what you've got to offer that employer. Ask yourself: what can I offer which makes me an attractive candidate for this job?

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 2:02 pm)

at this point, anything that would make me marketable, so I don't have to worry about future job losses as much.

I'm a liberal artist too. History degree.

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toooldtocare (Oct 29, 2017 - 2:28 pm)

Not sure I've been much help so a couple of points and I'm done.
First, I understand that more school costs time/$$$, but with a history degree and no other specialized skills, this would probably be the best route. I say this even though nothing's more maddening than the advice of "just go be a nurse, those jobs pay well" while no one realizes there's a lot of time and money involved, and maybe you don't want to be a nurse and (in my case, anyway) my science skills are so poor I'd probably flunk out. One of the lawyers who became a teacher was 42; his thinking was he'd work 20 and still qualify for a pretty good pension, which was a big plus because years of law practice didn't amount to anything saved for retirement.
Second, what are your legal research/computer software(the whole Office suite, etc) skills? I ask b/c I've been offered paralegal jobs-some doing research, some working as a quasi-investigator-which I turned down because I thought I'd find something better(really, really dumb, I know). Took a lot of 'splaining in my cover letter about my JD-said I had courtroom experience, found that I was better at research than representing clients, no interest in repping clients again, found my niche in research/pleading preparation, etc.
There are no sure things in the job market, so can't give any advice on job losses. Unless you get into a field where demand is constant-and healthcare is the only one I can think of-there will always be the danger of layoffs; I've known lawyers/engineers/teachers who were laid off.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 2:43 pm)

Meant just the knowledge knowing I'm marketable in a field where there's demand. Right now I can't say that because i can't even get a lawyer job, and can't get a non lawyer job.. To lose a job in the future not knowing if I'll ever work again is really anxiety provoking, just want to be marketable.

Man, I've spent $250k on my education already.. Though it's probably going to come down to going back to school again. I'm pretty bad in math/science too, though I could probably pass those classes.

Don't think these government pension things are sustainable. Kids born today probably won't have them, though they'll be obligated to pay for the pensions of current government workers/teachers..

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esquire138 (Oct 29, 2017 - 8:17 pm)

a quarter million dollars, I remember watching reruns of the original batman where that was the ransom amount for entire squads of super villians.......what fun times we live in.

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thecharmingmresq (Oct 29, 2017 - 12:04 pm)

also lawyers are notoriously/famously risk adverse. They are the opposite of what most jobs want. The MBA, reduced, is "here's how we're gonna do it!" the JD, reduced, is "on one hand...."

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qdllc (Oct 29, 2017 - 3:56 pm)

Yep. That’s a Catch-22. In one sense we’re litigious (certainly aware of our rights and how to enforce them), which many employers hate, and we’re risk adverse as we are trained to spot the worst case scenario and find ways to mitigate it.

I’ll add a third...we tend to be smarter and work harder than our peers. That can be a point of concern for a HR person...especially in the corporate world.

I have had issues with the new “paralegal” in our office. She was hired into the position with no training or experience. She was a former secretary. She’s slowly learning, but she thinks more of her value than she should. That attitude has caused some friction.

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patenttrollnj (Oct 29, 2017 - 5:57 pm)

Calling a JD a "scarlet letter" is a bit much. However, all the problems discussed above are real.

l do want to highlight another such problem that I have found very difficult to overcome.

Specifically, the law degree is a worthless piece of fluff that teaches you NOTHING of any value whatsoever to a non-legal employer. Thus, most lawyers don't have the qualifications to get into a non-law job, or there are simply better trained non-lawyers competing for the same position.

Perhaps if you're already working in the company as an in house attorney (or you work intimately with a company's employees as outside counsel), it is possible to get hired into a so called "JD preferred" job. However, most of us are not in this situation.

This is why I think lawyers really do need to either go back to school, or find some other way of re-training. If not, switching careers is not likely to happen.

Note that it's no coincidence that lawyers have to take jobs as UBER drivers and/or waiters at restaurants. My friend just ran into a lawyer working as a sales girl at a department store.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 6:21 pm)

You can easily say too that a law degree doesn't even teach you how to practice law. It may be of value to legal employers, but you have no idea how to practice law coming out of law school.

now I've got to research on what I should go back to school to study for, but still have at least 1.5 years of doc review left before I can even do that.

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patenttrollnj (Oct 29, 2017 - 7:20 pm)

Well, it's like I said, the law degree is a "worthless piece of fluff."

This is why it's so important to have it come from Harvard, Yale or some such elite school, OR to have law review on your resume. The only value of the law degree is as a "hood ornament" to impress a potential employer.

As for what to study, I think there are some good options out there. Plus if you're still under 30 (or around there), there is a lot you can still do. My advice is just get any lowly, low-paying job somewhere and take your time to figure it out. Good luck!

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 29, 2017 - 7:24 pm)

Hehe. I had law review, was top 5% in my class, articles editor, my note got published. None of that helped me in the slightest . I’m in my 40s. Will be doing doc review to pay off debt and that’ll give me time to look up some field to study

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patenttrollnj (Oct 29, 2017 - 10:33 pm)

Oh, so you're in my boat ... LOL

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junkwired (Oct 31, 2017 - 11:35 am)

The reason your stats didn't help you is because you have other overwhelming issues, not because law school accomplishments are inherently worthless. Many students would benefit greatly from graduating with your grades, law review, and a published article.

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prempal (Nov 19, 2017 - 8:45 am)

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i am new here in this community.
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fettywap (Oct 29, 2017 - 11:20 pm)

I've had employers tell me they have hired lawyers in the past for non-law jobs and they ended up quitting once they found a legal job. Having done both, it's awkward to be around uneducated people. Maybe that's more of a female thing though. In my current job, the legal assistants are gross and have horrific home lives, and they talk about everybody behind their backs.

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patenttrollnj (Oct 30, 2017 - 2:08 am)

Oh God, you got to watch out for these legal assistants.

We had one that was putting our clients in touch with each other behind our back. She thought she was being helpful to them, and didn't realize all the ethical and liability issues she was getting us into.

Still, the best was at my first job when we caught two of our younger support staff making out in the file room.

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mrtor (Oct 30, 2017 - 9:25 am)

Honestly, this issue extends well beyond the legal realm. Most experienced professionals struggle to change careers. You may have a small window early in your career to try to change over, but established professionals quickly lose that opportunity. For instance, you're generally not going to see an architect become a financial analyst or a soft engineer become a retail manager. There are too many qualified candidates with more relevant credentials for most positions. You need specialized experience or re-education to make yourself competitive. Even then, you may be "over-qualified" for certain positions. A lot of people hate that term, but there is some truth to it.

I think the best strategy is to focus on quasi-legal positions. You can still spin your experience as at least somewhat relevant. However, you need to learn everything you can about the role before interviewing. Too many attorneys think they can "wing it" -- and many can for attorney interviews. However, when branching outside of that, you'll fall flat on your face if you cannot competently articulate what the new role involves, why you want the role, and why you are a good fit for it.

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patenttrollnj (Oct 30, 2017 - 8:50 pm)

Very true.

Unfortunately, there really aren't too many quasi-legal positions that are interested in hiring lawyers.

No way to spin it, but the employment situation for attorneys who have "aged out" is really bad. Attempting to find these quasi-legal or so called "JD Preferred" jobs is often an exercise in futility. This is especially true if your only experience is at small law, insurance mills and/or document review.

The solution has to be very specific to the individual, and it requires a great deal of thought and effort--and luck.

As I keep saying, it's no coincidence lawyers end-up working retail, driving cabs or becoming waiters. The situation is THAT bad.

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esquire138 (Oct 30, 2017 - 8:54 pm)

JD preferred tends to be docreview, and working at callcenters in collection agencies from what I've seen. $15 an hour type jobs.

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patenttrollnj (Oct 30, 2017 - 9:00 pm)

Yup, those are the more realistic "JD preferred" jobs out there.

Things like risk management, compliance and/or asset management are just not doable for most lawyers, much less the "cool" jobs you hear about in law school that former lawyers do.

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triplesix (Oct 30, 2017 - 9:13 pm)

This... ironically JD is only an asset for a quasi legal job if you already got a skill or a few extra that qualifies you for that job in the first place. In those cases JD adds. Otherwise HR lady sees a JD as lightly used "rubber" with a hole too big to fix.

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mrtor (Oct 31, 2017 - 9:40 am)

I actually just transitioned from insurance defense to healthcare risk management -- it wasn't easy but it can be done. Two out of the six regional risk managers are attorneys. The rest are nurses. At least two of our compliance officers are also attorneys with average credentials. We also just attended a conference hosted by our claims management company. I would venture to say between one quarter and one third of their employees were attorneys. Malpractice claims management companies seek attorneys because the claims are far more complex than fender benders, property damage, or workers' compensation. I think it's an overlooked option for those who can spin their credentials as relevant.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 10:14 am)

Do you think that can be done if one's so called legal experience is minimal, such as only having done doc review?

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mrtor (Oct 31, 2017 - 10:35 am)

It would be tough with only doc review. Many people do not understand what doc review is and, even when explained, struggle with it. I think you need to make some small moves before you are positioned to seize a truly great opportunity. First? Get out of doc review. Get yourself into something -- anything -- that develops your skill level or at least can be spun as valuable experience. For instance, maybe consider working in an entry-level healthcare contracts review position. These are low level non-attorney positions, however, the position and skills could be spun to climb the ranks later on.

Consider more education, regardless of how revolting it may sound. It is not what you learn that is valuable -- it is your ability to use it as an excuse to reset your career. Take online courses in claims management then try to get an entry-level claims adjuster position. If you succeed, you can try to spin your experience to climb into a more specialized claims management role later on.

The take away is to stop languishing day-in-day-out in a dead end job. With some ambition, preparation, and good presentation, there are plenty of great opportunities out there.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 10:39 am)

I'm now considering more education, though unsure of what field to pick.. As for the contracts review positions, will they even take me given I'm a lawyer? Any ballpark on how much it pays? I still have quite a bit of debt, hence why I'm doing the doc review to get out of that so I can open up my options.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 10:54 am)

Those they probably don't count for squat, libraries offer free GALE online courses. I'm taking a HIPAA compliance one starting in December... Also more soon I'm starting a chemistry refresher on there and a couple others. Again, I doubt anyone would take these seriously and wouldn't put it on a resume, but at least it is free learning of something.

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mrtor (Oct 31, 2017 - 11:59 am)

Not sure how much those contract review positions pay, but you could get on an income-based repayment plan if you're struggling with the payments. Many hospitals are 501(c)(3)'s, so you could potentially do PSLF as well. You will almost certainly need to endure some short term suffering to re-position yourself longer term.

If you're open to a drastic career change, have you considered physician assistant school? You would likely need to take some science pre-requisites, but you are almost certainly guaranteed high pay, great benefits, and decent hours for only two years of advanced study. With demand as high as it is, you get to call the shots. Other positions require only a certification. Some jobs in radiology and nuclear medicine come to mind. They also pay fairly well.

I think it is essential to position yourself in a field with high demand and good growth prospects to overcome your experience.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 12:04 pm)

I've considered that, especially Radiology technician. I hopefully can somehow overcome my weak stomach. Even a MRI scanner has to inject the contrast into the patient.. two years of study is a lot though..

Any way possibly prereqs I have from a long time ago might still count, though I would need the fresher. Just would want to cut down on cost/time.. Even if I can defer my loans in school, that's two years of interest that would accrue. then whatever the tuition for this is. man.. argh. god I wish I had a time machine.

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patenttrollnj (Oct 31, 2017 - 11:53 am)

That's a good thing you were able to transition into this field.

But, again, not so sure it's possible for most attorneys. For example, if you were doing something like family law or worked at an unremarkable firm pushing paper, not so sure anyone in healthcare's HR department would call you in for an interview.

I speak a bit from personal experience. I tried for such positions a few years back, but I gave-up after looking for a little over a year. I wasn't able to get beyond the receptionist in the HR department.

Don't get me wrong, I think it's perfectly logical for a hospital NOT to want to hire a patent/trademark lawyer from a small firm (even though I did work in hospitals pre law school AND have a background in the bio-seiences). Still, as you noted, a nurse would have been a better option for them.

Regardless, I did make the effort, mostly because I kept hearing things like "it is possible" or "the law degree is helpful." When, in fact, it really is not for many of us law graduates that don't have the experience the non-law employer is looking for.

I'm fortunate in that I was employed during this period, so it was worth trying and it didn't really hurt me any. However, attorneys scraping to get by cannot waste their time chasing rainbows like this.

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williamdrayton (Oct 30, 2017 - 2:11 pm)

notreallawyer: for the last month or so of your voluminous posting, I've wondered if you are a troll - I'm still unsure.

however, if you are real I may have some advice for getting out of law if your only experience is doc review.

post a throwaway personal email.

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esquire138 (Oct 30, 2017 - 4:10 pm)

If I recall correctly he/she posted recently that they were unemployed for a bit (no doubt a factor in number of posts) and recently got a govt job working with a judge scheduled to start soon.

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wolfman (Oct 31, 2017 - 2:46 am)

that's someone else

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 9:40 am)

are you the guy on reddit who sent me a message?

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williamdrayton (Oct 31, 2017 - 10:56 am)

no - I don't use reddit. but if you want some basic information i may be able to help

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 11:05 am)

Thanks, just give me a bit to create a throwaway email account.

Here we go

[email protected]

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burneremail (Oct 31, 2017 - 12:26 pm)

Have you considered becoming a coder/web developer? There are plenty of free courses and academies that can teach you the basics. Do it at night after your doc review gigs. Freelance on the side. Even crappy ones can make $25+ an hour and good ones make up to $100 an hour. Put together a good portfolio and you can make over 70k a year. Coding is the future. If you truly want a job with security and don’t want to go back to school, here you go. A free option. All it takes is time and effort.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 12:33 pm)

I'm terrible at things math/science related. I took pascal in high school, and while i did okay gradewise, I didn't learn anything. In college I took fortran, and barely passed and ONLY because my project partner did all the work for our project which was a big part of our grade. I began college taking engineering prereqs and had a 2.2 GPA. Could barely pass calculus. Don't think I'm any better at those things now. I think I'll try a free class anyways.

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burneremail (Oct 31, 2017 - 2:12 pm)

Basic html is so frickin easy i really don’t even know what to say.

You’ve now come up with stuff that doesn’t even really apply to a job I suggested. You don’t have to be good or even mediocre at math/science/engineering to learn how to code.

You do not need a PhD in Astro physics to learn how to code. Seriously, come on.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 2:24 pm)

Is coding different than programming? When I hear coding I assume programming. Is it something different? I am HORRIBLe at programming. I couldn't even learn basic.

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triplesix (Oct 31, 2017 - 2:27 pm)

Same thing although programming could imply sometbing higher level like c++, over lets say JavaScript.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 1:56 pm)

Ugh, I looked up my local community college's Radiology program and there's two biology classes I'd need to take before I could even apply for the program.

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patenttrollnj (Oct 31, 2017 - 3:03 pm)

It's not the end of the world to have to take a biology class.

If you're worried, spend some time on Khan Academy (sp?) reviewing biology. There are plenty of other online resources that are free that can help you prepare for these classes. A mere youtube search will almost certainly bring-up some helpful things.

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notreallyalawyer (Oct 31, 2017 - 5:05 pm)

The community college got back to me, there's 4 classes I'd have to take before I could apply to it. Is there any chance my community college could have a crap program? It's allegedly one of the best community colleges in the country. But I don't know if there are employment statistics.. That's something I'd need to find out about. But just thinking about it, gives me a feeling of hope. SOmething that I've not felt in a long time. I still think I'd have to wait two years to do this just to get my debt levels down. I could begin the prereqs next year, but they only accept people once a year. At least for this program, which is probably the cheapest option because it's my community college.

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mrtor (Nov 1, 2017 - 9:42 am)

Just perusing local listings makes me think there are no "bad" programs with the current level of demand out there. As long as the program is accredited, I think you will be fine.

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mrtor (Oct 31, 2017 - 3:13 pm)

It would be well worth it. You may even be able to take those pre-requisites on an accelerated basis online. However, before you commit, examine their placement numbers and see whether there are radiology job listings in the areas you're willing to live. Healthcare is on fire, but you still want to be an informed consumer to avoid repeating past missteps.

While the salary isn't mind blowing, I think the position offers decent pay. You also get outstanding benefits, good hours, and stable work. That's as good as it gets.

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superfly000 (Oct 31, 2017 - 5:00 pm)

Have you ever thought of trying your hand at Accountancy?

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