Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Open notes bar exam

Like in school and in practice. It's time right? esquire13811/04/17
I don't know about you but I like my bar exams closed book. isthisit11/05/17
Far better would be limited bar exam & licensing. I mean, dingbat11/09/17
I'm in favor of a general bar exam for your license and an o isthisit11/10/17
I'm a big proponent of the specialized bar exam. If someone thirdtierlaw11/10/17
People self specialize for a reason. The jamokes who hav isthisit11/10/17
They call it a bar because its a bar to entry in the field. cocolawyer11/09/17
Honestly, I'd say go back to every state being like WI and n esquire13811/10/17
You mean like Marquette which has an average LSAT of 153, an dingbat11/10/17
sure, let slip the dogs of war........... esquire13811/10/17
Only if all those graduates are your opposing counsel :) cocolawyer11/10/17
I'll be honest - sometimes I like when the opposing counsel dingbat11/10/17
esquire138 (Nov 4, 2017 - 12:42 pm)

Like in school and in practice. It's time right?

Reply Like (0)
isthisit (Nov 5, 2017 - 9:08 am)

I don't know about you but I like my bar exams closed book. Very hard, believe me I know hard, very hard. And open book bar exams are no good. Real low energy. I've talked to very smart attorneys, you wouldn't believe how smart. And they agreed that closed book exams are big league.

Reply Like (0)
dingbat (Nov 9, 2017 - 2:46 pm)

Far better would be limited bar exam & licensing.

I mean, no attorney who didn't grow up in the dinosaur age practices Torts, Crim, Real Estate and Contracts.

Have specialized bar exams that provide limited licenses, like the patent bar. We could have a litigation bar, a tax bar, an open bar, you name it

Reply Like (0)
isthisit (Nov 10, 2017 - 9:25 am)

I'm in favor of a general bar exam for your license and an optional specialized bar exam to call yourself a certified "whatever" attorney.

Reply Like (0)
thirdtierlaw (Nov 10, 2017 - 10:59 am)

I'm a big proponent of the specialized bar exam. If someone wants to be a "general practitioner" then they can take multiple exams. I believe it'll produce much better "baby lawyers." As of right now, I know less about real estate law than I did in law school, and someone would probably be better offer being pro-se than hiring me to deal with a real estate issue.

Sure I could learn. Hypothetically, my law school education and the little bit I learned for the bar should make it easier for me to pick up that area of law. But I'd still be practicing at a drastically lower level than someone who has it as a small portion of their everyday practice.

I practice criminal and family law. It's shocking to me the basic state specific things that new attorneys miss. We are talking about basic suppression issues, but because it is different than the federal case law it doesn't even cross their mind that it may be a State issue. An area specific exam would solve that issue really quickly.

Reply Like (0)
isthisit (Nov 10, 2017 - 2:04 pm)

People self specialize for a reason.

The jamokes who have a door practice are doing their license and clients a disservice.

Reply Like (0)
cocolawyer (Nov 9, 2017 - 4:37 pm)

They call it a bar because its a bar to entry in the field. It's entire design is to ensure individuals are unable to practice and to protect the public from moron attorneys (Although I know so so so so many idiots in the profession, I am not certain if that is "really" the reason).

Do you really want to have even more attorneys overpopulating the market place, diluting your value, and suppressing your income? Probably not. So onward difficult bar exams. California in fact should arbitrarily raise the pass score to an even 1500 for s**** and giggles.

Reply Like (0)
esquire138 (Nov 10, 2017 - 9:47 am)

Honestly, I'd say go back to every state being like WI and not requiring it at all if an in state grad who took an extra course or whatever.

But for CARPETBAGGERS?!?!?!?!?!
RUN THE GAUNTLET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Reply Like (0)
dingbat (Nov 10, 2017 - 5:11 pm)

You mean like Marquette which has an average LSAT of 153, and a 25% of 149?

yeah, they're all qualified to be practicing attorneys right out the gate!

Reply Like (0)
esquire138 (Nov 10, 2017 - 5:33 pm)

sure, let slip the dogs of war...........

Reply Like (0)
cocolawyer (Nov 10, 2017 - 5:46 pm)

Only if all those graduates are your opposing counsel :)

Reply Like (0)
dingbat (Nov 10, 2017 - 10:50 pm)

I'll be honest - sometimes I like when the opposing counsel is dumb, but mostly I find it awful.

Yes, you can insert provisions that totally prejudice his/her client, but at the same time, they try to make changes that are at best pointless, and at worst malpractice. Or you need to explain several times that what they're doing is a deal breaker because they don't get it. (like the attorney who tried to include multiple states in the choice of law clause).

I don't know how often I've worked hard to prevent some dumbass from being sued for malpractice - not from some sort of altruism, but because it was better for my clients to straighten things out. Bonus points to the nincompoop who kept pushing back against my amendments when I was trying to prevent multiple parties from cross-suing each other over faulty documents.

Reply Like (0)
Post a message in this thread