Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Opinions About Office Space

I am in the process of starting a practice with two other at jj1011/05/17
It is a seriously underrated movie. joshdoctson11/05/17
Haha - Too good. jj1011/05/17
That copier has it fvcking coming!!!! FvckingA! esquire13811/05/17
What do your partners think? esquire13811/05/17
They're split - so I might be the decider. I tend to lean to jj1011/05/17
Hire a stripper to flip a coin. Write it off as a business c esquire13811/05/17
If clients have to pay anything to park or have to walk too jeffm11/07/17
Jeffm is credited. In any smaller metro (under 3-5 million), flyer1411/07/17
Agree with jeffm and flyer 14. I know this is silly, but ha jd4hire11/07/17
Can't you get a silicon valley app to run an algorithm on th aknas11/07/17
Always go for the max office space you can afford. You run qdllc11/07/17
It sounds to me like most of you could practice wherever, as onehell11/07/17
Most lawyers are downtown. Maybe there is something about b doublefriedchicken11/07/17
Really? In many places there is the lawyer strip where there downwardslope11/07/17
Thanks for the input! I feel that the office on a surface st jj1011/13/17
jj10 (Nov 5, 2017 - 10:39 am)

I am in the process of starting a practice with two other attorneys. Two of us, including myself, focus on first party insurance claims, commercial disputes, and PI/comp. We are licensed in a total of 5 states and we're starting to get property damage cases in FL and TX, in addition to a mixture of other litigation work. The other attorney helps us with the litigation stuff but is mostly focusing on a mixture of estate planning, bankruptcy, and family law cases. We're currently subleasing a few offices from another firm. We are considering entering a lease in one of two options: (1) a four-office space with conference room and reception area in a downtown area with little street parking or (2) three office space in a converted house that is located on a local road that gets a decent amount of traffic. The downtown office has another established firm in the same building. The house office is in an area that is about 75% residential with a mixture of small professional offices, restaurants, and retail sprinkled in.

I am interested in what you all think about each option. The house office is going to cost a few hundred dollars more each month. I feel like the residential area might be good for easy advertising (sign out front) and would be easier for clients to find parking and just walk in. We are primarily a plaintiff firm that also does some flat fee work, so the parking situation downtown has me concerned, even though there is a parking garage across the street. However, most plaintiff firms are located in the downtown area, so I feel like being there might make us seem more legitimate, something that is important to us as a new firm. Plus, the office downtown is bigger and we could sublease an office or two.

Any thoughts or questions will be much appreciated.

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joshdoctson (Nov 5, 2017 - 10:43 am)

It is a seriously underrated movie.

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jj10 (Nov 5, 2017 - 10:45 am)

Haha - Too good.

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esquire138 (Nov 5, 2017 - 10:45 am)

That copier has it fvcking coming!!!! FvckingA!

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esquire138 (Nov 5, 2017 - 10:44 am)

What do your partners think?

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jj10 (Nov 5, 2017 - 10:47 am)

They're split - so I might be the decider. I tend to lean towards the downtown space because it is bigger and in my opinion a better deal. The parking situation and traffic is my biggest concern.

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esquire138 (Nov 5, 2017 - 2:26 pm)

Hire a stripper to flip a coin. Write it off as a business consultation.

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jeffm (Nov 7, 2017 - 9:44 am)

If clients have to pay anything to park or have to walk too much, don't do the downtown deal.

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flyer14 (Nov 7, 2017 - 9:51 am)

Jeffm is credited. In any smaller metro (under 3-5 million), people are notoriously averse to parking and walking. Downtown is also filled with "those people" that 85% of a metro area's residents want nothing to do with, whether real or imagined.

Your business model will do far better in a suburban location unless you're in a major city.

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jd4hire (Nov 7, 2017 - 11:50 am)

Agree with jeffm and flyer 14. I know this is silly, but having worked in a suburban setting and then in a downtown metropolitan area, with another office in a major US metropolitan area, there is a psychological impact on me as to where I work. This is wearing off as I age, but when I first started downtown in a highrise with a nice view, it made me feel good (I know this is silly, but real).

Also, downtown space does have the ability to wow prospective clients.

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aknas (Nov 7, 2017 - 1:00 pm)

Can't you get a silicon valley app to run an algorithm on the numbers and give you s bottom line?

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qdllc (Nov 7, 2017 - 1:06 pm)

Always go for the max office space you can afford. You run out of it a lot faster than you think.

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onehell (Nov 7, 2017 - 2:25 pm)

It sounds to me like most of you could practice wherever, as your clients aren't going to be coming into the office much. But the family/bk guy has a very different practice, one which in my experience requires a lot of hand-holding. Assuming he's pulling his weight, perhaps he has the most at stake here?

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doublefriedchicken (Nov 7, 2017 - 3:24 pm)

Most lawyers are downtown. Maybe there is something about being downtown that seems "professional" especially to the unemployed pain and suffering crowd.

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downwardslope (Nov 7, 2017 - 3:54 pm)

Really? In many places there is the lawyer strip where there are lots of houses with adequate parking that are law firms more so than downtown. Then again, in my hometown, downtown parking was either expensive or gravel and flooded during rain...not to mention under construction. Many places also have eternal downtown construction that turns people off driving there.

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jj10 (Nov 13, 2017 - 9:48 am)

Thanks for the input! I feel that the office on a surface street with easy parking might be easier for our clients. Most of our clients will only have one or maybe two cases we handle for them so be accessible is a big deal. We've actually looked at a few first floor offices on a busy street with train service, public transportation, and ample parking. On a personal level, being downtown would be better. I just like the feeling of being downtown closer to the action. But I think it would ultimately cost us clients.

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