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Questions for those practicing buisiness immigration.

Work for an established solo who practices exclusively famil confused1l9311/28/17
The vast majority of business immigration clients will be As secondcareerlawyer11/28/17
Anything is possible with a law degree. With that said, isthisit11/28/17
Thanks. I was already aware that most of the clientele in th confused1l9311/28/17
confused1l93 (Nov 28, 2017 - 11:32 am)

Work for an established solo who practices exclusively family immigration. Clients are exclusively Spanish speaking. I am wondering if it is possible to expand the practice to buisiness immigration. Would it even be worth the time and effort to do so? Snarky responses are always welcome.

Area- metropolitan/large city with an extremely large Spanish speaking population.

Size of the firm. 2 associates and 6 or so office staff.

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secondcareerlawyer (Nov 28, 2017 - 12:14 pm)

The vast majority of business immigration clients will be Asian. Either Indians on H1b or L visas or Chinese on Eb5.

The H1b visas are pretty much locked up by a handful of law firms because the sponsor employer pays and they deal in volume.

Chinese legal immigrants fall into 1 of 2 categories generally. Those requesting asylum and those on eb5. Better brush up on your Chinese or have an in with the local Chinatown. Chinese generally are a wealthier clientele than the Hispanic populations. I speak Chinese and Spanish fluently so understand both worlds.

An interesting angle to explore is offering Chinese immigrants investment visas to Latin America. It is not reported in the English press. But volume is growing. Especially to places like Costa Rica, Panama, and Brazil.

Read up here for more info.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-09-14/how-rich-chinese-use-visa-fixers-to-move-to-the-u-s

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isthisit (Nov 28, 2017 - 1:58 pm)

Anything is possible with a law degree.

With that said, I'm doing Immigration (SIJS, Asylum, etc.) in Newark with no CrimImm or business Imm. So take my opinion for what it's worth in that context.

Business Immigration seems to be the domain of the local larger firms who already have relationships with companies/businesses. When I was in-house we used the same large regional firms for our H1Bs.

It's probably not impossible to attract the Indian and Asian business population but it's probably going to be more difficult to connect with those guys.

Buena suerte.

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confused1l93 (Nov 28, 2017 - 11:51 pm)

Thanks. I was already aware that most of the clientele in the area are asian. Thats obvious hurdle #1. I am interested in whether it makes sense for an established solo to expand. I would imagine it would mean changing the infrastructure of the practice, given that the money in family immigration is made in high volume petition work.

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