Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Career Advice Needed - Rural Job Offer

Some background: I'm 32, graduated law school in 2016 and pa midwestlaw02/14/18
Does your wife work? dopesmokeresquire02/14/18
She does work in medical billing and earns about 1/3 of my s midwestlaw02/14/18
Idk about your state but my state has appointments to surviv mattbaileylawdotcom02/15/18
Wife won't go, so don't do it. Moreover, the schools near t jeffm02/14/18
I still have a criminal practice I just stopped advertising midwestlaw02/14/18
absolutely take the job, especially if the state has a decen defensivelawyer02/14/18
I'd be living in a small town of about 4000 approximately 30 midwestlaw02/14/18
I also say you should take the job. Your wife should be able cranky02/14/18
The job can be a stepping stone to a legal career. Separatin thirdtierlaw02/14/18
Do you like cold winters? Will your wife be able to find wor khazaddum02/14/18
"Living near a reservation is jarring." No doubt. Before jeffm02/14/18
I hate the winters but I also hate not practicing law and my midwestlaw02/14/18
It is your call but just remember the grass is seldom greene khazaddum02/14/18
From my experience, legal aid lawyers get pigeonholed as leg jorgedeclaro02/14/18
Some things I'm confused about: 1) zero transferable ski joecoder02/14/18
I represented about twenty clients over 2017 in traffic, min midwestlaw02/14/18
"... it’s becoming a problem continually having to skip ou jeffm02/14/18
Also, my friend and I are both early 1990's law grads. We w jeffm02/14/18
Very true. Though its funny that in Law everyone encourages khazaddum02/16/18
We don't encourage them to commit serious screw-ups. Most n jeffm02/16/18
“[I] deal with a lot of self doubt and questioning if I’ jorgedeclaro02/14/18
You throw a lot out there. It’s a good-paying job ($50K) qdllc02/15/18
I'm expecting a major adjustment and to be honest, even thou midwestlaw02/15/18
Don’t lose your family to practice law near a reservation. notiers02/15/18
she might be warming up to it, the plan though would be me g midwestlaw02/15/18
Based on this thread I’d wager Bismarck or Pierre. I stron khazaddum02/15/18
Do not do it. It will not aid you and in fact will harm you. boomeresq02/15/18
My mother is native and went to work on a res for a couple o captain02/15/18
For myself and family we could not take living rural near a trijocker02/15/18
this sounds terrible. these are degenerate places. hold out whiteguyinchina02/15/18
I know it's a terrible place but that also means no competit midwestlaw02/16/18
LOL that OP is considering destroying his family to "have a tcpaul02/16/18
Is the same writer who had severe Catholic guilt? He was un trijocker02/16/18
not trolling, if i were im sure i could be more creative midwestlaw02/16/18
"They pay me $55k for this while my lawyer friends getting r aknas02/16/18
starting salaries for municipal prosecutors in my area is so midwestlaw02/16/18
Your options after working rez cases will be more low-rent r khazaddum02/16/18
I like criminal defense work and that really doesn't sound a midwestlaw02/16/18
Not sure what's best course for OP, but nothing about his po inho2solo02/16/18
Update: So I'm going to the area in early March to check it midwestlaw02/21/18
Isn't 60 to 80k better than the other offer? I would take a trijocker02/21/18
This new one seems an easier decision. Somewhat better area dogdaypm02/21/18
What are the long-term prospects and what are your long-term nighthawk02/21/18
Hold out for the public defender or keep searching at home. jorgedeclaro02/21/18
Agree with the others, get that PD job. You will have very g dopesmokeresquire02/21/18
It's unfortunate, but I think you are underestimating your a 2tierreality02/22/18
^ A decent idea. jeffm02/22/18
I considered that I might be too old for entry-level law job midwestlaw02/23/18
Congrats. Sounds like you listened to your gut and made a go 2tierreality02/24/18
Do you really want to live in South Dakota? clocker102/24/18
South Dakota does not accept UBE. Probably North Dakota dingbat03/01/18
an actual demonstrated willingness to serve difficult to ser defensivelawyer02/24/18
send me a throwaway email address, I can probably provide mo dingbat03/01/18
[email protected] thanks midwestlaw03/02/18

midwestlaw (Feb 14, 2018 - 8:55 am)

Some background: I'm 32, graduated law school in 2016 and passed the bar in a Midwestern state (being vague as I don't want to state too much specifics). Since passing the bar I have never worked at "real" law job and my current position is best described as sort of a JD advantage job or in-house counsel that doesn't involve practicing law. I'm not sure why the company I work for decided they needed to hire a lawyer on staff but I think they had other ideas on my role here but didn't understand until it was too late that I cannot provide legal advice to customers across 50 states while the company collects a fee for the advice. The work I do now is pretty mindless and could be easily completed by a 6th grader. If this company decided to let me go or closed up I have zero transferable skills. They pay me $55k for this while my lawyer friends getting real experience and trying cases are making as low as $32k but in the long run will have more options.

Since I graduated I've been applying for every type of legal job in my state and gotten a few interview opportunities and zero offers. I feel like time is running out because why would an employer want an older grad 2 years out with zero experience when they have their pick of fresh 2018 grads in a few months? I tried soloing on the side taking criminal cases and did alright in 2017 pulling in something like $20k but I don't think that would ever pan out to anything more than a side hobby or something to pursue post-retirement.

On a whim I applied to a legal aid position in a rural state as an attorney assisting reservation clients. I had an interview which went well and got an offer I've been sitting on now for a week. The pay is just under $50k and I would be able to practice right away on motion but would need to take the next bar. I scored in the top 20% or so of bar takers when I took the exam so I'm not too concerned and The pay is slightly less but there's a lower cost of living and opportunity for raise when I become barred.

I also have a wife and 3 year old daughter and she is not too excited about moving where she knows no one but I've been trying to get across this might be my only chance to be a real lawyer and actually learn skills to build a career. I explained the idea is we do this for a couple years and then move to one of the larger cities in that state or back home so I could possibly have enough to bring to the table to get a real position. It's gotten to the point she's proposed basically separating so I can pursue a career.

So should I take the rural job? What kind of challenges would I face and how miserable would I be if anyone has experience in these areas?

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dopesmokeresquire (Feb 14, 2018 - 9:25 am)

Does your wife work?

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midwestlaw (Feb 14, 2018 - 9:30 am)

She does work in medical billing and earns about 1/3 of my salary. She does not have any degree if that matters and could probably find a similar position just about anywhere, afaik she can work remotely at her current job.

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mattbaileylawdotcom (Feb 15, 2018 - 1:03 pm)

Idk about your state but my state has appointments to survive off of if you're willing to travel to rural areas

Why not do that? Being my own boss is great. Someone could offer me double and I would turn it down.

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jeffm (Feb 14, 2018 - 9:46 am)

Wife won't go, so don't do it. Moreover, the schools near the reservation probably suck, and your kiddo is going to start soon. Send her to a top-quality school.

You should have stayed in your criminal practice, but don't cry over spilled milk. Stay in the city. Be with your wife. Support your little one in her education.

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midwestlaw (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:03 am)

I still have a criminal practice I just stopped advertising and taking on new clients in the meantime. It's also cost me job opportunities when I have dates scheduled out months ahead such as the one firm that seemed ready to hire me but didn't like fact I needed to make a few more 30-minute court appearances to resolve cases.

The other problem is I have little experience and most of the time have no idea what I'm doing, worry I'm giving bad advice and screwing over a client, and there are few resources to figure out if I'm correct. I think I got lucky last year with a few big cases family members of clients ponied up the money for that resolved with miracle plea bargains.

I've also never been able to organize the business side very well and 2017 taxes were a nightmare, I can't even figure out quickbooks and pretty much gave up with that after frustration with it ad just put all my business receipts in a cluttered manila folder. I also waste a lot of time with consultations or potential clients asking a million questions over the phone and then never signing up or begging for payment plans with no money down.

I really think I need to find a position with a law firm, public defender, or prosecutor but after all the interviews I've had I get the feeling no one is going to hire me anytime soon and the clock is ticking to find real legal work.

Ideally we'd live an hour away from work site in the closest "major" city so there would be schooling opportunities and by the time she's ready for kindergarten hopefully I'd have enough experience to move elsewhere.

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defensivelawyer (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:14 am)

absolutely take the job, especially if the state has a decent sized city somewhere. You do this job a few years, apply for other gov jobs elsewhere in the state. Your kid is young enough that it doesnt matter where the kids at. your wife can work at home, ad you can still be with her.

i know some people who started gov careers with similar moves. Supporting your wife and supporting your kid to me means making decent money without killing yourself so you can be there when youre not working. the best way toward this is the rural job, not current job, not staying in your current spot so wife can have "friends" who she probabyl wont have in 20 years anyway.

agree, however, you shouldnt send kid to school on the rez

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midwestlaw (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:21 am)

I'd be living in a small town of about 4000 approximately 30 minutes away or the state capitol which is just about an hour away so there should be numerous school opportunities. She's currently in jewish community center daycare which I doubt I'll find in this area though.

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cranky (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:21 am)

I also say you should take the job. Your wife should be able to understand that this is a stepping stone to a better career path for you in the long run. Then that would also mean more money for the family, and a dad that isn't depressed over his job prospects. Having a fun social life takes a backseat to the greater good of the family unit and financial security for the future. Good luck!

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thirdtierlaw (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:42 am)

The job can be a stepping stone to a legal career. Separating from your wife, and losing time with your child, to pursue a legal career is not worth it. Do not give up your family to work in a profession that most people are unhappy working in. But if your wife is willing to come with you, then it's worth the $5k pay cut to get actual experience to put on your resume.

I'd have to imagine that getting in with a reservation would work the same as breaking into certain immigrant neighboorhood in a city. Where if you do a great job with them, they'll recommend their whole neighboorhood to use you as their attorney. So even if most people in the neighboorhood do not have money, there will be a few that has the cash to actually pay.

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khazaddum (Feb 14, 2018 - 11:16 am)

Do you like cold winters? Will your wife be able to find work in the area?

Do you think this job will enhance your future in a meaningful way?

This job sounds like a good fit for someone your age without a spouse or kids. Living near a reservation is jarring. Communicating primarily with reservation members is even more jarring.

These folks need legal help, but not everyone can handle the lifestyle change involved.

Even if you hate your current job, you can talk up job duties for a corporate job on a resume. If you go from a company to a rez, and then want back at a company that pays benefits/raises again, you need a really good explanation for the reservation job.

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jeffm (Feb 14, 2018 - 11:30 am)

"Living near a reservation is jarring."

No doubt. Before I accepted the job and made the move, I'd go there and stay in a motel for 10 days. If that doesn't convince you to run, maybe the job was meant to be.

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midwestlaw (Feb 14, 2018 - 11:41 am)

I hate the winters but I also hate not practicing law and my career options dwindling with every day I waste at my current position. I also tried applying for public defender/AG/prosecutor positions in Guam, American Samoa, and Marshall Islands but no responses.

I think I'd get immediately experience and have the chance to try cases and argue motions which I cannot do in my job now. Even as a solo I'm so exhausted at the end of the day I cannot effectively prepare for trials between my current job responsibilities and raising a family.

I would not live on the rez as there are no housing options and would live in a small town 30 minutes away or capital city 1 hour away. It would still be a major cultural change but these areas have more activities and resources.

I don't know if she would find work but her present position allows her to work remotely so she could possibly continue.

I don't think anything I do here translates to a corporate job, my job right now is a complete joke and I wonder why they even keep me on.

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khazaddum (Feb 14, 2018 - 11:50 am)

It is your call but just remember the grass is seldom greener on the other side.

Most jobs are boring. Most people question why they aren’t fired. I think after 12 months in a job, the average man will detest it.

After 4 job changes I just stuck with the job I have now, which is in a volume creditor’s bankruptcy preference and contested exemption practice.

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jorgedeclaro (Feb 14, 2018 - 12:27 pm)

From my experience, legal aid lawyers get pigeonholed as legal aid attorneys forever. And this might be because most of the legal aid attorneys are true believers who want to stay in legal aid.

I like some of them personally but I hate legal aid attorneys professionally. They get away with making frivolous arguments that I would get bench slapped for. They also unintentionally encourage their clients to lie by pressing them on all the possible loopholes (no one lies about not being served more than a legal aid client). Legal aid attorneys are also obsctructionists over working towards the merits to the extreme. Granted, there are tons of obstructionist attorneys out there, but legal aid means the opposing party is poor which means the client is spending tons of money with zero chance of actual recovery beyond repossession of the property.

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joecoder (Feb 14, 2018 - 9:36 pm)

Some things I'm confused about:

1) zero transferable skills - yet you pulled in 20k in a side practice?

2) utter lack of prospects, yet you almost landed a job but for your side practice?

It seems like your major concerns are learning skills and having someone tell you what to do. Why not just work on skills for your side practice where you live now?

I don't think it's worth it to uproot your family (which they don't want) or to separate just to jump at the first legal offer you've received.

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midwestlaw (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:00 pm)

I represented about twenty clients over 2017 in traffic, minor criminal, and a couple felonies. I was a PD intern throughout law school and know enough about handling a criminal case but I have no trial experience and deal with a lot of self doubt and questioning if I’m handling things the right way or wasting too much time on one thing and missing something else entirely. I was lucky getting a couple clients who were able to pay a few grand each and their cases resolved in plea bargains.

I had an interview with a firm two hours from me but they needed someone to start almost immediately and the attorney who interviewed me called me to say I was passed over in favor of someone who was already local and didn’t need to move. I also had to appear for a DUI sentencing in two weeks which was my only remaining client at the time and that was another issue.

I’m also supposed to be at my real job full time and it’s becoming a problem continually having to skip out to go to court or meet with potential clients that don’t even have money to hire me. When I was hired I expressed that I wanted to gain court experience and that I would like to represent criminal case clients on the side and was told this was ok but I don’t want to abuse that.

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jeffm (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:06 pm)

"... it’s becoming a problem continually having to skip out to... meet with potential clients that don’t even have money to hire me."

Sounds like you are good at spotting the problem. You can't figure out how to fix it? It only takes 3-5 minutes on the phone to find out this information. You are not a legal aid clinic. Think in your own financial interest and learn how to conduct "business."

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jeffm (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:10 pm)

Also, my friend and I are both early 1990's law grads. We were just reminiscing earlier today on the earlier days when we learned on the job. The only way you are going to learn is to do, and the best lessons, believe it or not, are the ones where you get your butt handed to you on a platter. It's good to have fear in the litigation arena. Stop feeling bad about being afraid. I bet most veterans will agree that you should start worrying when you stop fearing. That's when you're most likely to blunder badly.

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khazaddum (Feb 16, 2018 - 8:48 am)

Very true. Though its funny that in Law everyone encourages newbies to screw up cases early on to learn.


The doctor is not told it is ok to kill patients in surgery to learn. The engineer isn’t encouraged to implement novice and high-fail-rate design strategies in building the bridge over a river.

We are the ultimate profession of hacks. None of us could have made it in the other professiona But we get away with it very well.

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jeffm (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:19 am)

We don't encourage them to commit serious screw-ups. Most newbie solos will not get a case important enough to make a grave error. They just worry too much about every possible little error. And of course, it's not like there's a dearth of experienced attorneys everywhere who can be sought out for some advice to make sure things are going alright.

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jorgedeclaro (Feb 14, 2018 - 10:44 pm)

“[I] deal with a lot of self doubt and questioning if I’m handling things the right way or wasting too much time on one thing and missing something else entirely.”

I think I’m hot sh!t and I constantly deal with self-doubt about whether I’m handling things right or missing something. It’s part of caring about your clients. And being young.

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qdllc (Feb 15, 2018 - 10:42 am)

You throw a lot out there. It’s a good-paying job ($50K) but rural yet 30 minutes from a state capitol. That seems to indicate the Dakotas or possibly Nebraska.

If you’re 30 minutes from a state capital, odds are education and social life won’t be horrible, but there will be an adjustment based on what you are used to.

Also, it may open doors to work at a firm if you’re not happy with the new job as a long term prospect.

Have you spent any time there to see what it’s like? Where you would likely live? What your neighbors would be like?

Once you know that, you can better pro/con your current situation. I agree with your concern about being stuck if you don’t do something about your current position, though.

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midwestlaw (Feb 15, 2018 - 10:55 am)

I'm expecting a major adjustment and to be honest, even though I live in a town of about 190k currently, the traffic and crowding can get irritating at times and I think I might enjoy somewhere with less population. I'm thinking of making a weekend trip out to the area sometime in March if I take the job.

I've sent about 5-10 resumes a week for over a year and had maybe 20 interviews with zero offers. I'm kind of getting sick of the BS of having to leave work and drive hours all over the state to waste my time getting passed over for someone more qualified or who is a better cultural fit.

Solo work will never pay the bills as it is, especially doing just criminal work as the clients usually cannot pay and start calling random lawyers looking for the lowest fee when their public defender pissed them off.

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notiers (Feb 15, 2018 - 10:54 am)

Don’t lose your family to practice law near a reservation. If this is going to be the catalyst for the end of your marriage - don’t do it and keep looking for a job where you currently live.

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midwestlaw (Feb 15, 2018 - 10:56 am)

she might be warming up to it, the plan though would be me going there first and since id be taking another bar id probably need the time to myself to prep.

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khazaddum (Feb 15, 2018 - 11:47 am)

Based on this thread I’d wager Bismarck or Pierre. I strongly advise visiting the state capital before you decide. The Great Plains capital cities are like remote exurbs by Midwest or East Coast standards.

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boomeresq (Feb 15, 2018 - 2:17 pm)

Do not do it. It will not aid you and in fact will harm you. If you need trial practice, take on a pro bono or two through the bar with mentoring. Your risk is huge. You could lose you family and wind up living in a hell hole and flunking the bar. Your current job looks better on a resume than legal aid and a pay cut.
Also, your child is settled into her day care. Why uproot her for an unknown. If you are part of a community, the isolation of not being part of one can be brutal especially during long dark winter.

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captain (Feb 15, 2018 - 2:41 pm)

My mother is native and went to work on a res for a couple of years (medicine). She and my father absolutely hated it. Toughest clients in the world. I have no idea how directly you work with the native population, but it can be very difficult as it seems they rarely have their own best interests at heart and rarely want to improve their lot.

That being said, i personally like small town living and would take a pay cut to live in a town with 4k inhabitants.

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trijocker (Feb 15, 2018 - 3:07 pm)

For myself and family we could not take living rural near a reservation
Unless if was perhaps near the Taos pueblo or outside Phoenix.

It seems like you are indicating it is in the Dakotas. Where is your wife from? Do you really want to have your child grow up attending that quality schools and what if you have more children? These our all factors that should be considered.

Personally, I would stick with your current gig that pays 55k rather than move near the reservation.

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whiteguyinchina (Feb 15, 2018 - 11:44 pm)

this sounds terrible. these are degenerate places. hold out for something better. your wife will hate it. your daughter will hate it. and theyll both hate you.

if its really so important to you. let your wife and kid stay put and you chase your lawyer dream. live in a motel and drive home every weekend.

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midwestlaw (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:03 am)

I know it's a terrible place but that also means no competition which is probably why I got an offer. Back home I'm competing with dozens for $35k jobs as an attorney. In May I will have graduated 2 years ago. Realistically I can never be an attorney back home unless I solo or someone takes pity on me or beg for a job back at the PD making 50% what I make now.

I don't expect it to be paradise. As it is I spend most of my free time at home anyways and have little of a social life besides my family so I don't think things would change that much.

I would spend the first few months there by myself and study the bar, then send for my family. My wife confirmed she can continue to work at home and keep her job.

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tcpaul (Feb 16, 2018 - 7:20 am)

LOL that OP is considering destroying his family to "have a career in law." Good luck with that. I'm sure you'll have no regrets in 5 years when you'rs divorced, your child has a new daddy, and you're arguing sh$t motions on a reservation.

Wait, I just realized OP was trolling. He must be. LOL. Good one, bro.

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trijocker (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:00 am)

Is the same writer who had severe Catholic guilt?
He was unable to handle divorce cases because he was a devout Catholic and it went against his faith.

Then there was the girl the other day who didn't want to take the bar because she missed her bf.

Somebody must get their jollies off posting these tearjerkers and reading the responses.

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midwestlaw (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:04 am)

not trolling, if i were im sure i could be more creative

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aknas (Feb 16, 2018 - 8:11 am)

"They pay me $55k for this while my lawyer friends getting real experience and trying cases are making as low as $32k but in the long run will have more options."

These numbers need more analysi

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midwestlaw (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:06 am)

starting salaries for municipal prosecutors in my area is something like $32k, county prosecutors make about $50k. public defenders are making under $30k. i've had interviews at firms where they laughed at my expected salary of $50k and said they pay $30k but you keep 1/3 of what you bring in or whatever.

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khazaddum (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:15 am)

Your options after working rez cases will be more low-rent rez work. I doubt anyone is making more than 35k representing rez members. The Tribes retain one of the 4-6 federal indian law boutiques in the Midwest for their organizational representation. They don’t hire the attorneys that represent the members.

Tribal courts don’t have to follow any civil or criminal procedures of the state.

The exit options here are being a criminal defense solo or family law associate in Pierre, Sioux Falls, or Rapid City. Not the end of the earth. But its not opening up any jobs in non-retail law.

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midwestlaw (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:20 am)

I like criminal defense work and that really doesn't sound all that bad. It would also let me make a move back home eventually with some actual experience.

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inho2solo (Feb 16, 2018 - 9:25 am)

Not sure what's best course for OP, but nothing about his post set my trolldar to ringing.

I have a friend who took a federal res job to pay off her med school loans. Her husband wasn't too happy with the idea but she was going to be the major breadwinner so he gave in. They're still there years after debt forgiveness and loving it.

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midwestlaw (Feb 21, 2018 - 1:28 pm)

Update: So I'm going to the area in early March to check it out and see if I could envision myself living there, look at housing options, test the commute, etc.

Meanwhile I just got an interview set up for a public defender job in a different neighboring rural state. This state allows admission based on MBE score only so no bar exam just the C&F BS. Pay looks between $60-80k and the area has a population just under 50000 and even a very small Jewish community. Still would be very rural, very cold, and probably a major cultural difference between my mixed blue/red swing state to a red state.

Take this position if offered, go with the sure job on the rez, or hold out in my home state?

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trijocker (Feb 21, 2018 - 1:41 pm)

Isn't 60 to 80k better than the other offer?
I would take anything over making my family move to the res.
Also, it sounds like you are jewish and there is a synagogue there so at least your family would have someone to socialize with.

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dogdaypm (Feb 21, 2018 - 1:42 pm)

This new one seems an easier decision. Somewhat better area than the res (likely easier sell for your wife), still get trial skills, and more pay (repeat prior parenthetical!).

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nighthawk (Feb 21, 2018 - 1:42 pm)

What are the long-term prospects and what are your long-term goals? Do you want to start your own firm that will have a strong litigation focus? Public defender is an excellent place to go because the training you will get as a litigator will be second to none. Also, because it is a small community, you can get your name out and network within the Jewish community there. If this will be a short ride then you will have the training but not the networking or name recognition.

If you are looking to go in-house then it is probably best to stay put where you are now.

In other words, choose a realistic path and weigh your options.

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jorgedeclaro (Feb 21, 2018 - 1:46 pm)

Hold out for the public defender or keep searching at home. Defenders get great trial experience. You can transition into private later and in the meantime you’ve got government benefits and schedules.

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dopesmokeresquire (Feb 21, 2018 - 1:48 pm)

Agree with the others, get that PD job. You will have very good exit options.

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2tierreality (Feb 22, 2018 - 9:43 pm)

It's unfortunate, but I think you are underestimating your age as a factor in your being routinely passed over. Most firms, big and small, want "fresh meat" for the grinder.

I say pass on the tribal legal aid law job, hard as that may be. I think it will pigeon hole you.

My suggestion: instead of sending out resumes, send out offer letters to various small town solos and partnerships. Tell them that you are interested moving from being a part-time solo to full time, and that you'd like to take over a small practice in a small rural town when the principal is ready to retire.

This may sound shady, but your letter might land in the lap of 65-70 year old who just got a cancer diagnosis, and you could be the answer to his prayers. The long-term potential of taking over an established practice is probably your best bet. Considering your age, you may be more attractive as a candidate since you could appear more "mature" than a recent grad.

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jeffm (Feb 22, 2018 - 10:00 pm)

^ A decent idea.

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midwestlaw (Feb 23, 2018 - 11:37 am)

I considered that I might be too old for entry-level law jobs but then again I look young, get routinely ID'd to even buy a BIC lighter or cough medicine, and if I shave look like a high school senior. I had a couple clients who found me online remark my profile photo on Avvo makes me look 12. A couple times I've even gone to interviews with a slight beard or wore glasses that day to make myself look older.

I did accept the tribal law position for now but wouldn't start til early summer unless something else comes along. Still holding out for a few interviews though.

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2tierreality (Feb 24, 2018 - 11:51 am)

Congrats. Sounds like you listened to your gut and made a good move to satisfy your "itch". You also seem very passionate about the practice of law, which already puts you ahead of your peers. Best of luck to you.

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clocker1 (Feb 24, 2018 - 1:38 pm)

Do you really want to live in South Dakota?

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dingbat (Mar 1, 2018 - 4:14 pm)

South Dakota does not accept UBE. Probably North Dakota

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defensivelawyer (Feb 24, 2018 - 10:36 pm)

an actual demonstrated willingness to serve difficult to serve populations will land you a pd job later, if you want it.

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dingbat (Mar 1, 2018 - 4:13 pm)

send me a throwaway email address, I can probably provide more pertinent answers

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midwestlaw (Mar 2, 2018 - 8:46 am)

[email protected]

thanks

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