Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

How badly can a past employer screw up your C&F?

Leaving a job and pretty much burning a bridge and leaving p saulgoodmanwannabe03/20/18
It’ll be a nuisance. C&F will ask why you left every job. dingbat03/21/18
As an aside, slacking off and shoddy work product is definit dingbat03/21/18
Not really, it's a small office and everyone is real close k saulgoodmanwannabe03/21/18
Sounds like it’ll be a minor hiccup at your next C&F, noth dingbat03/21/18
I’m also applying for temporary admission under the state saulgoodmanwannabe03/21/18
Temporary admission? Are you doing admission on motion? If s onehell03/22/18
Reciprocity based on MBE score so as long as my score qualif saulgoodmanwannabe03/22/18
Oh wow. They didn't have that when I was fresh out. Wish the onehell03/22/18
every state is different - some will accept UBE scores 2 yea dingbat03/22/18
saulgoodmanwannabe (Mar 20, 2018 - 3:33 pm)

Leaving a job and pretty much burning a bridge and leaving people with a sour taste. Not proud of how I handled it but the job left me dissatisfied with my career and it showed in my work. I slacked off a lot, had a shoddy work product, and left early or took a lot of days off since it was never really policed.

Still I never stole, committed fraud, or committed any crime in the workplace. Does being a sh**ty employee screw up C&F?

I am already barred in one state and this is an “attorney” position but no one else here is a member of the bar and none of the work involves practice of law.

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dingbat (Mar 21, 2018 - 4:25 pm)

It’ll be a nuisance. C&F will ask why you left every job. If they fired you, you’ll need to explain. Even if you weren’t fired, a lot of states will send them a questionnaire, and if it’s not filled out positively and returned, they’ll ask you why.
But if there’s no malfeasance, there’s no reason not to admit you.

Basically, best case scenario it’ll delay your C&F process, worst case, it’ll seriously delay your C&F.

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dingbat (Mar 21, 2018 - 4:29 pm)

As an aside, slacking off and shoddy work product is definitely a bad sign in the eyes of the C&F examiner. After financial malfeasance, procrastination and lack of communication is the second biggest reason for bar discipline.

Do you have a former co-worker you’re on good terms with whom you can list as the person to contact?

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saulgoodmanwannabe (Mar 21, 2018 - 5:39 pm)

Not really, it's a small office and everyone is real close knit. I feel like my leaving was taken as a betrayal as I seem to be getting the cold shoulder from everyone.

Also, there's no HR here, no real enforcement of time off or anything other than "don't abuse it." The boss never interacts with us, or does so rarely and usually comes in at 7:30 and leaves around 10. There is no hierarchy but another employee sort of assumed the role of liaison between the boss and the rest of the employees.

I have no disciplinary file to my knowledge. I was also never given any feedback on my performance until January when I'd been there 2 years so I really had no clue my work had some errors if any of that helps me.

When I came on board I wanted to continue practicing law on the side and my employer said that was ok understanding that I would need to attend court a lot. Most of my missing work was due to court appearances or client meetings. After a year of doing this I was finally told I would have to work nights/weekends to make up time which contradicted something I was told earlier on so I decided to make my exit. I did miss a lot of days to interview at other jobs though.

I had no real troubles with C&F the first time around. No adult criminal record or significant debts other than student loans and I only had this awful job and a speeding ticket since the last time I passed C&F.

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dingbat (Mar 21, 2018 - 8:17 pm)

Sounds like it’ll be a minor hiccup at your next C&F, nothing to worry about

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saulgoodmanwannabe (Mar 21, 2018 - 8:25 pm)

I’m also applying for temporary admission under the state rules which my new employer has to sponsor. My application itself should take at most six months to process.

I’m guessing it’ll help I’ll have a chance to be on my best behavior with the new job?

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onehell (Mar 22, 2018 - 1:00 pm)

Temporary admission? Are you doing admission on motion? If so, that usually requires that you have been actively practicing for something like 5 of the last 7 years. If none of the work of this job involved actual practice, as you say, then that sounds more problematic than any risk of generalized badmouthing which I agree with others would at most delay but not prevent admission.

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saulgoodmanwannabe (Mar 22, 2018 - 1:39 pm)

Reciprocity based on MBE score so as long as my score qualifies and was within two years I’m good to go.

If there’s an issue that comes up I suppose my new position would hopefully vouch for my professionalism as an attorney.

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onehell (Mar 22, 2018 - 2:34 pm)

Oh wow. They didn't have that when I was fresh out. Wish they did, because my first job out of law school was in a state where I had no desire to live. I was originally planning on just putting in my 5 years and then doing admission on motion, but a lot happens between ages 25 and 30. You get a lot more tied down, just something that tends to happen in life.

PSLF didn't exist either, not for several years after I graduated. If only I'd gone to law school a few years later I'd probably be out of debt by now, in a state where I'd much rather live. Oh well.

Also, it's interesting the sort of "donut hole" a system like this creates. If you've been out less than two years, you can move. But if you've been out more than 2 but less than 5, you're stuck until you hit the magic 5 for admission on motion. Too much experience to transfer your score, not enough experience for admission on motion. So arbitrary.

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dingbat (Mar 22, 2018 - 9:10 pm)

every state is different - some will accept UBE scores 2 years old, some 3
some require 5 years for admission on motion, some 3 years. some require continual practice, some not (e.g. 5 out of the last 7 years)

Some states have a donut hole, some will extend the UBE acceptance time with proof of continual practice

Some states have no admission on motion, some will accept admission on motion for any practicing attorney, and some require reciprocity

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