Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Staying put vs. New firm opportunities.

I have been at my mid size insurance defense firm for one ye yankeebirdie04/01/18
I doubt anyone will be able to predict what your personal ex jeffm04/01/18
I’d say that as a rule of thumb you’re justified in leav trickydick04/01/18
Thanks. I think that sounds very reasonable. yankeebirdie04/01/18
This is correct. If you get offered over 20%, unless you kno gladigotaphdinstead04/02/18
I'd say investigate the firm culture/people/environment to t 3lol04/01/18
Yeah, luckily I know someone at the new firm whom I can ask yankeebirdie04/01/18
I would stay. People underestimate the positive effects of l joshdoctson04/01/18
I think the opportunity to try other areas is a big plus, as justdoingok04/01/18
Very rarely does money have much to do with how much you lik tcpaul04/01/18
yankeebirdie (Apr 1, 2018 - 1:52 pm)

I have been at my mid size insurance defense firm for one year now. I like the work, the people, and overall I like the firm and they like me. However, I will be interviewing with a bigger firm that will likely offer me a better salary, if i am fortunate enough to receive an offer, with an opportunity to try other areas of litigation. Location is a wash for me. This is a scenario I think a lot of you are familiar with. Is it as simple as "take the firm where they will pay you more?" Do i stay at my current firm where I know i am well liked? Big fish in small pond vs small fish in big pond scenario? Any suggestions are appreciated. Thanks all.

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jeffm (Apr 1, 2018 - 1:56 pm)

I doubt anyone will be able to predict what your personal experience will be as you try to advance your career. If you could find out what the firm "culture" (hours, stress, respect, etc.) is at the prospective firm, it might help you.

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trickydick (Apr 1, 2018 - 2:03 pm)

I’d say that as a rule of thumb you’re justified in leaving for anything in excess of a 20% pay increase. You’d be a fool to turn down a position with a 30%+ pay increase barring some serious trade offs. What you don’t want to do is be floating around from position to position every one or two years for modest 5% to 10% increases which any decent firm should be offering you anyway.

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yankeebirdie (Apr 1, 2018 - 2:06 pm)

Thanks. I think that sounds very reasonable.

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gladigotaphdinstead (Apr 2, 2018 - 7:24 am)

This is correct. If you get offered over 20%, unless you know you're walking into a much more difficult situation, you should always take it. People over value "happiness at work" and "getting along with coworkers." Presumably you would have sussed out whether the people at the new firm were insufferable during the interview process. Otherwise, what reason do you have to fear you wouldn't like the new people just as much? Besides, if you are really close with your current coworkers you will stay in touch.

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3lol (Apr 1, 2018 - 3:02 pm)

I'd say investigate the firm culture/people/environment to the best of your ability. I really like the firm I work at now (great people, location, hours) but in my experience the vast majority of private law firms are hot toxic garbage.

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yankeebirdie (Apr 1, 2018 - 3:07 pm)

Yeah, luckily I know someone at the new firm whom I can ask all of these questions. But i'm still not sure if I want to leave my friends at my current firm behind...

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joshdoctson (Apr 1, 2018 - 6:00 pm)

I would stay. People underestimate the positive effects of liking your job and being comfortable- peace of mind is worth more than a few thousand dollars.

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justdoingok (Apr 1, 2018 - 9:32 pm)

I think the opportunity to try other areas is a big plus, assuming that's what you're interested in doing.

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tcpaul (Apr 1, 2018 - 9:55 pm)

Very rarely does money have much to do with how much you like your job. If you truly like the one you have now, I'd be wary to make a move. I've made two moves but only because I was truly unhappy where I was at. The problem with changing jobs is it is almost impossible to know if you will like the new job until you've been there for a while. It's a risk.

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