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Solo practitioners initial consultation fee

Solo practitioners: is it rude to ask a particular attorney jinomas04/08/18
It's fine to ask any questions like those, but it's not a gu jeffm04/08/18
You're welcome to ask. Can't guarantee you'll get a positive isthisit04/08/18
Yes, OP that is rude and a red flag to me that the person is cranky04/08/18
Questions about "price flexibility" are a huge red flag to m cacrimdefense04/08/18
I don't think it's rude, but it sends a signal to the attorn guyingorillasuit04/08/18
This. A potential client worried about a hundred bucks is go jorgedeclaro04/10/18
It depends, how do you feel if you put up a classified ad, a trollfeeder04/09/18
yet biglaw bills are routinely negotiated. go figure. whiteguyinchina04/09/18
jinomas (Apr 8, 2018 - 12:20 pm)

Solo practitioners: is it rude to ask a particular attorney why they charge more for an initial consultation than other attorneys and whether they are flexible on price or is it a red flag that the client may not have the ability to pay later when bill comes due?

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jeffm (Apr 8, 2018 - 12:29 pm)

It's fine to ask any questions like those, but it's not a guarantee as to how any particular attorney will react.

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isthisit (Apr 8, 2018 - 2:33 pm)

You're welcome to ask. Can't guarantee you'll get a positive response.

A potential client asking why the consultation fee is higher than other local solos signals to me:

1. Client is broke; and
2. Client is shopping his/her case around and has already been told to hit the road by other attorneys.

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cranky (Apr 8, 2018 - 5:56 pm)

Yes, OP that is rude and a red flag to me that the person is not worth having as a client. It is a sign that the person will later try to cut down my bills, be a pain to deal with and to collect further retainers from, or simply can't afford legal assistance.

Attorneys charge whatever they do because good clients are willing to pay that much for his or her counsel. If I were desperate for business, then I would be lowering my fees to less than what comparable attorneys demand. If I'm busy, I'm not going to waste my time with someone who wants to bargain my fees down or question the rate. Sometimes I feel like telling cheapos/tire kickers that if they don't think my time is of any monetary value, they can just ask one of their friends or relatives for free advice.

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cacrimdefense (Apr 8, 2018 - 6:40 pm)

Questions about "price flexibility" are a huge red flag to me. People who request a discount or "your best price" are invariably the ones who will demand the most attention and call, text or e-mail me more than 90% of my other clients.

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guyingorillasuit (Apr 8, 2018 - 7:52 pm)

I don't think it's rude, but it sends a signal to the attorney that this is not a client worth having. If they are bargaining with you about fees before they ever met you, this relationship is guaranteed to end poorly. If you believe the lower-rate attorney can offer a better deal, why not just go consult with the lower-rate attorney?

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jorgedeclaro (Apr 10, 2018 - 12:25 am)

This. A potential client worried about a hundred bucks is going to be a nightmare when the are facing a five figure bill.

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trollfeeder (Apr 9, 2018 - 4:43 pm)

It depends, how do you feel if you put up a classified ad, and someone responds asking "what the lowest price you will sell it for"?

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whiteguyinchina (Apr 9, 2018 - 11:25 pm)

yet biglaw bills are routinely negotiated. go figure.

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