Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

In-House position v. law firm re: insurance company

For those of you who practiced in a private firm and went in lawdawg05/02/18
True in-house or defending insurance companies insureds in l jd4hire05/03/18
Hi - I meant in house for an insurance carrier defending sam lawdawg05/03/18
Defending the carrier, or its insureds? Most carriers ha jd4hire05/03/18
If OP didn't mean captive counsel defending insureds, I woul nofaultkillself05/03/18
I'm not sure whether OP means in-house insurance defense, i. flharfh05/03/18
Hi - It’s in-house defending the carrier and its insureds, lawdawg05/03/18
That’s not a typical role. Most every carrier I’m famil therover05/04/18
Hi - maybe the better term is General counsel. Basically, it lawdawg05/04/18
Our point is that if that work is defending the carrier when therover05/04/18
It’s defending the carrier in first party property suits lawdawg05/04/18
First party property can be a hybrid of coverage and traditi therover05/09/18
lawdawg (May 2, 2018 - 10:13 pm)

For those of you who practiced in a private firm and went in-house for an insurance company, what are the pros and cons? Are you still in-house? Switched back to private firm? Went solo? Thanks!

Reply Like (0)
jd4hire (May 3, 2018 - 9:37 am)

True in-house or defending insurance companies insureds in litigation? Big difference between the two.

Reply Like (0)
lawdawg (May 3, 2018 - 12:47 pm)

Hi - I meant in house for an insurance carrier defending same as opposed to in house for like McDonalds. Thanks.

Reply Like (0)
jd4hire (May 3, 2018 - 2:17 pm)

Defending the carrier, or its insureds?

Most carriers have an in-house legal office that deals with a wide range of legal issues. Staff counsel, field counsel, etc., defend the insureds - not the carrier (unless it is a bad faith case whereby one attorney in one staff counsel office will defend the insured and often another staff counsel attorney and/or office will defend the carrier).

Reply Like (0)
nofaultkillself (May 3, 2018 - 11:00 am)

If OP didn't mean captive counsel defending insureds, I would like to hear people's input on that.

Reply Like (0)
flharfh (May 3, 2018 - 2:48 pm)

I'm not sure whether OP means in-house insurance defense, i.e. an attorney employed by an insurance company who defends the company and its insureds in litigation, coverage counsel, or the in-house role you'd see at any large corporation that deals with regulatory compliance, contracts, advising, etc.

I started out at an ID firm and moved to litigation defense for a large insurance company after about three years of practice and would be happy to answer questions, if that's what's being asked about.

Reply Like (0)
lawdawg (May 3, 2018 - 8:43 pm)

Hi - It’s in-house defending the carrier and its insureds, coverage determinations, etc.

Reply Like (0)
therover (May 4, 2018 - 8:52 am)

That’s not a typical role. Most every carrier I’m familiar with has a “staff counsel” program and true in-house lawyers.

Staff counsel is insurance defense work for their insureds. It’s a way for companies to save money but not hiring insurance defense firms.

In house is broad. As someone said, it’s all the typical in house positions you’d find in any company PLUS lawyers who do insurance coverage work defending the insurance company.

I’m not familiar with any insurance company where their lawyers do both staff counsel work for insureds and insurance coverage work for the insurance company.

Op - are you certain this position is doing both?

Reply Like (0)
lawdawg (May 4, 2018 - 2:08 pm)

Hi - maybe the better term is General counsel. Basically, it would be defending the carrier from the inside as opposed to shelling the work to outside firms, in order to save on costs.

Reply Like (0)
therover (May 4, 2018 - 2:33 pm)

Our point is that if that work is defending the carrier when ABC insurance company is being sued that is different than defending Joe Smith, ABC’s policyholder when he is sued. Typically these are separate jobs.

Reply Like (0)
lawdawg (May 4, 2018 - 4:24 pm)

It’s defending the carrier in first party property suits

Reply Like (0)
therover (May 9, 2018 - 9:41 am)

First party property can be a hybrid of coverage and traditional defense work. Do you have more details about what exactly you’d be doing?

Generally getting any type of coverage experience is a good thing and helps distinguish you from the typical ID defense skills.

Reply Like (0)
Post a message in this thread