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LLM in financial and securities reg worth it if employer pays?

Certainly would not do this on my own dime; that's not even kw6713a05/07/18
It will carry as much weight as your current employment lol. triplesix05/07/18
Thanks. Kind of figured it wouldn't help vs. work experienc kw6713a05/07/18
If your job will cover tuition (and give you a raise once co isthisit05/08/18
Even if it ends up being "worthless" on a resume, you should thirdtierlaw05/08/18
I'd do it. It's a no-brainer IMO based on what you stated i jd4hire05/08/18
As long as the LLM school is equal to or more preftigious th flharfh05/08/18
OP, flhafh has it right. If you are to get an LLM, it shoul hairypalms05/08/18
The only prestigious llm there is tax from NYU or, to a less onehell05/11/18
I have an LLM from H/Y/S and it is utterly useless. I w massivemissive05/11/18
Coming from a non law hr background, when the employer cover pisces21305/12/18
kw6713a (May 7, 2018 - 9:30 pm)

Certainly would not do this on my own dime; that's not even under consideration. Cost to me would be de minimis. However I very much like learning legal concepts. I realize I could learn this material from books on my own, but am wondering two things: (1) whether having accountability through classes would keep me on track (as opposed to saying I'll learn new areas of law and never doing it) and (2) whether the diploma would carry any credibility with employers of any kind. Anyone have this degree or have insights?

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triplesix (May 7, 2018 - 9:42 pm)

It will carry as much weight as your current employment lol...

It won't hurt but it ain't gonna open anymore doors. You might get a should at antohwr oci though if you go to a decent poooseat

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kw6713a (May 7, 2018 - 9:48 pm)

Thanks. Kind of figured it wouldn't help vs. work experience. OCI isn't particularly useful to me either.

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isthisit (May 8, 2018 - 7:35 am)

If your job will cover tuition (and give you a raise once completed, even if it's small) than it's worth it. But your experience will always trump it.

It certainly can't hurt.

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thirdtierlaw (May 8, 2018 - 8:49 am)

Even if it ends up being "worthless" on a resume, you should still do it. They are obviously willing to pay for it because they want you to fill a role in that area of work. So after getting it, you'll gain practical experience in your LLM field. Most importantly, you're right on about being held accountable. Maybe I'm just a wicked procrastinator, but I have 3 practice guides sitting on the corner of my desk that I've barely touched. I keep meaning to read through them, but sadly with this profession, there is ALWAYS something else that needs to get done. But if you're in a class you'll make time because you're on a schedule.

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jd4hire (May 8, 2018 - 9:56 am)

I'd do it. It's a no-brainer IMO based on what you stated in your initial query. You like learning new legal concepts. I do think a class will keep you accountable. Second, it clearly has some value to your current employer. By that logic, I would think your employer's competitors would also find some value in it.

At the end of the day, it's another conversation starter and demonstrates your desire to further your knowledge base. My only hesitancy would be how much this would cut into your free time. If classes were all during the workday and your employer gave you time to do homework on the clock, that would be awesome. If classes start at 5:30 and run until 8:30 and you're doing homework on the weekend, that would be a bummer (but so is working).

When you complete the program, I'd look for a raise as well.

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flharfh (May 8, 2018 - 11:49 am)

As long as the LLM school is equal to or more preftigious than the law school you got your JD from, and as long as you are far enough into your career that you don't see yourself changing practice areas, I would say yes.

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hairypalms (May 8, 2018 - 5:15 pm)

OP, flhafh has it right. If you are to get an LLM, it should come from a law school with added prestige, i.e., top 14. Although most LLMs never open doors, an LLM in a specialized area such as financial compliance/regulation could easily tip the balance in your favor as between equal candidates. Just make sure that there are no restrictions (or restrictions that you are unwilling to live with) by your employer. For example, they might obligate you to spend a certain number of years working for them post graduation. Generally, I think an LLM is a waste of time except if you are an aspiring academic. Here, I think it sounds at least reasonable. Good luck.

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onehell (May 11, 2018 - 12:16 pm)

The only prestigious llm there is tax from NYU or, to a lesser extent, Georgetown or Florida. Anything else is usually of little value but hey, if your employer is footing the bill and keeping you employed such that you won’t have a resume gap if you ever have to leave it off your resume, then it can’t hurt and I’d say go for it.

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massivemissive (May 11, 2018 - 2:34 pm)

I have an LLM from H/Y/S and it is utterly useless.

I would recommend looking at the track record of people from the program you’re considering. Where do they go?

Even if the degree is free there are opportunity costs.

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pisces213 (May 12, 2018 - 1:26 pm)

Coming from a non law hr background, when the employer covers costs it’s usually because they need someone with that degree to cover something.

Now my question would be whether they’ll also pay salary or part of it while you study if it is a day course, if you have any idea why they chose (?) you for it, and how badly they need someone with that degree - will they hire someone from outside to cover their needs, for example.

Personally I would take it if i think it’s offered because they value me - mean to groom me for more responsibility.

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