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Omit position on resume

I resigned from my law firm job after 3 months. I was wonder sun51105/12/18
It's your resume... You decide what to put on it. triplesix05/12/18
You can put whatever you believe is relevant on a resume. Th thirdtierlaw05/12/18
Go for it. Just be ready to explain the gap. isthisit05/13/18
If it’s 3 months and if you don’t have a huge gap before pisces21305/14/18
Depends on the circumstances and how you would explain what dandydan05/14/18
I started applying for other jobs about a month into working sun51105/14/18
Of all the insanities of the legal job market, isn't the stu passportfan305/14/18
I quit a job after 6 months when I first became a lawyer. Ha fettywap05/14/18
You were self employed/doing a project/temp job for those th whipster05/15/18
I left a job after 5 months. The job forced me to practice jd4hire05/15/18
I've been fired from jobs and kept them on the resume (as cu prestiiigiousone05/22/18
The problem is some companies make you basically regurgitate bizzybone131305/23/18
sun511 (May 12, 2018 - 7:01 pm)

I resigned from my law firm job after 3 months. I was wondering if I still have to include it in my resume? Am I ethically obligated to include it in my resume? I am going in for an interview at a law firm that doesn't work in the same area of law as my former law firm so there shouldn't be any conflict issue. Both firms are located in NYC.

I would like to be honest and address it head-on instead of avoiding it by giving them an updated resume at the time of the interview, but I don't want them to get the wrong impression about me.

Any advice is much appreciated!

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triplesix (May 12, 2018 - 7:06 pm)

It's your resume... You decide what to put on it.

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thirdtierlaw (May 12, 2018 - 8:13 pm)

You can put whatever you believe is relevant on a resume. The resume is expected to be no more than a page, so obviously cuts need to be made.

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isthisit (May 13, 2018 - 9:20 am)

Go for it. Just be ready to explain the gap.

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pisces213 (May 14, 2018 - 6:46 am)

If it’s 3 months and if you don’t have a huge gap before it, I would omit it too. But if there is a long gap before it, it may be better to put it in, esp if the law firm you resigned from has a bad rep or is in an industry that people understand is not a good fit for some.

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dandydan (May 14, 2018 - 9:04 am)

Depends on the circumstances and how you would explain what happened. You would need to explain why you have a gap if it is not on your resume.

How did you get this interview initially? They would likely have seen your resume before inviting you for an interview. This does not add up.

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sun511 (May 14, 2018 - 4:11 pm)

I started applying for other jobs about a month into working at the former firm because I was looking to get out ASAP. I left it off my resume when I applied for the job because I didn't want to give off a bad impression.

I very much appreciate all the advice! Please keep it coming!

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passportfan3 (May 14, 2018 - 6:47 pm)

Of all the insanities of the legal job market, isn't the stupidest one the insistence that an applicant must document work or school every day since high school graduation?

There are a ton of reasons to take a few months off: helping with family matters, writing a paper or book, climb a mountain, a unique opportunity or -- get this -- to just take a few months off.

But, nope, a "resume gap" is one of the worst things you can have.

Stupid.

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fettywap (May 14, 2018 - 9:04 pm)

I quit a job after 6 months when I first became a lawyer. Had to leave it on my resume. Some people were not nice at all about it. I couldn't understand why they called me in for an interview if they were going to act like that.

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whipster (May 15, 2018 - 7:02 am)

You were self employed/doing a project/temp job for those three months if it comes up, remember?

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jd4hire (May 15, 2018 - 8:39 am)

I left a job after 5 months. The job forced me to practice law in a rushed, non-prepared way. I politely explained it and it wasn't an issue.

As an edit addition, I'd be cautious about affirmatively lying about the position. It's one thing to omit, another to have a white lie saying you weren't working, but an affirmative lie to say you were working a temp position, etc. If caught lying, no job offer will be forthcoming.

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prestiiigiousone (May 22, 2018 - 6:39 pm)

I've been fired from jobs and kept them on the resume (as currently employed). If you say you've been fired you aren't getting the job and you might as well not even interview. I've also had other jobs where I was fired/left really quickly and didn't include them. Why would I? It's not a signed, official document. As someone else said, it's my resume, and I can put what I want on it.

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bizzybone1313 (May 23, 2018 - 11:23 am)

The problem is some companies make you basically regurgitate your resume in the form of a signed document submitted to them. On these forms, they basically say if you omit any jobs from them that it is a basis for you getting fired.

Some companies do have the means and will go through the trouble of finding out every single place you have ever worked at. But this information is generally very difficult to obtain. And sometimes some companies don’t even check every single company you worked at for accuracy. Every employer values different things: work experience, education, GPA or references.

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