Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

How to ask for a raise?

I’ve been working for the same Solo for 6 years. My hourly rustytrombone05/15/18
I find that the easiest thing is to be clear, concise, and h supercalifragilisti05/15/18
Apply to other jobs and wait until you're getting offers. isthisit05/15/18
Don't do this... It will backfire. Solo bosses are a mental triplesix05/15/18
I'm not telling him to leverage offers against his solo boss isthisit05/15/18
Yep I agree. triplesix05/15/18
If he hasn’t voluntarily given you a raise in 6 years - yo notiers05/16/18
I run a small firm with a handful of associates. I try to g napoleone05/23/18
If you want to stay, your best bet is negotiating a bonus or midlaw05/23/18
I would start looking elsewhere for employment with your T-1 bizzybone131305/23/18
rustytrombone (May 15, 2018 - 1:42 pm)

I’ve been working for the same Solo for 6 years. My hourly rate has gone up twice and I’m way more experienced than I was 6 years ago. I don’t know how to go about asking for a raise.

Here’s some background information: I graduated in 2010 from a T14 law school. I struggled to find employment. I ended up homeless a year after law school because of a complicated divorce.

I appreciate my boss for giving me a chance when I was homeless and unemployed. I was paid a fair wage at the time, but after 6 years and trial experience I’d like to think that I am worth more. I’ve been scared to ask because I have anxiety about being homeless and never want to return to that, but I don’t want the past to be a reason that I discount my worth. Advice?

Reply Like (0)
supercalifragilisti (May 15, 2018 - 1:55 pm)

I find that the easiest thing is to be clear, concise, and honest. If the answer is no, it will be no. Explain that you feel you have contributed in a positive way through your work and that you are wondering if there might be an opportunity to see a return on that effort. You may want to qualify it with assurances of your continued interest in working for the guy if you are concerned he might be upset with your asking.

Reply Like (0)
isthisit (May 15, 2018 - 2:30 pm)

Apply to other jobs and wait until you're getting offers.

Then tell boss "Boss, give me a raise for the following reasons:. . ." And see how he reacts. If he says no, then jump ship.

Stay loyal to yourself not the job.

Reply Like (0)
triplesix (May 15, 2018 - 2:35 pm)

Don't do this... It will backfire. Solo bosses are a mental bunch, it ain't worth fuking with it.


Your boss unlikely to give you a raise based on the fact that you came here asking us that you want to ask for it.

Just get a new job. With 6 years of experience you would be able to get 20k+ else where.

Reply Like (0)
isthisit (May 15, 2018 - 2:47 pm)

I'm not telling him to leverage offers against his solo boss. But to have offers pending so he doesn't worry about being canned after asking for a raise and so he knows what his market rate is.

Starting a new job is probably the best way to get a pay raise and not have any baggage.

My OP wasn't clear.

Reply Like (0)
triplesix (May 15, 2018 - 3:16 pm)

Yep I agree.

Reply Like (0)
notiers (May 16, 2018 - 2:51 am)

If he hasn’t voluntarily given you a raise in 6 years - you really ought to leave on general principle. You don’t owe him anything at this point.

Reply Like (0)
napoleone (May 23, 2018 - 12:37 am)

I run a small firm with a handful of associates. I try to give raises twice per year. Before you ask, you need to think about the firm's profitability. If the firm is doing well, most bosses will share the wealth, at least some of it.

Reply Like (0)
midlaw (May 23, 2018 - 2:53 am)

If you want to stay, your best bet is negotiating a bonus or payout based on what you bring in through origination or billed work - you mentioned that your rate has gone up twice. Asking for a raise in small law that isn't tied to revenue/profit is usually not effective.

Otherwise, look elsewhere and jump when you get a better offer.

Reply Like (0)
bizzybone1313 (May 23, 2018 - 7:34 am)

I would start looking elsewhere for employment with your T-14 pedigree. The economy is basically at full employment and can’t get any better. I would try to go to a small boutique or to “mid law” with your experience and T-14 level. Also, look into the Big Four accounting firms; with your pedigree, you may be able to get in there with a high 5 figures salary. They usually start JD’s at around $80-$90Kish.

If you are scared of ever being unemployed, get hired to do some adjunct instructor job on the side at some college or some other afternoon part time job like LSAT teaching prior to jumping ship. You presumingly had a very good LSAT score and could do this. In fact, my Powerscore LSAT instructor was a recent Harvard Law graduate, who quit Big Law and was teaching LSAT prep while doing a few cases on the side until she returned to school to get her PhD.

Additionally, start an eBay business to generate additional income. Once you list the items the first time around, it runs itself fairly efficiently and smoothly.

Don’t let your T-14 pedigree go to waste. You don’t “owe” anyone but yourself and your current or future family anything. You need to maximize your earnings for yourself. If you are underpaid, you need to go elsewhere for more money.

Reply Like (0)
Post a message in this thread