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EEOC trial attorney jobs

Hi all, Wanted to start a thread for all those who applie formyfuture06/10/18
I applied for that an investigator job. Heard back about 2 w fettywap06/10/18
Investigator jobs are almost impossible to get unless you ar chuckrhoades06/11/18
Yes I’m wondering how long it will take. I imagine they wa formyfuture06/10/18
I am a trial attorney at the EEOC. If you have any questions chuckrhoades06/11/18
What’s the daily job like.do many cases actually end by ju chasman3306/12/18
Your day depends on your case load and the status of your ca chuckrhoades06/12/18
How much of a push does your office feel to hire? Does it ta formyfuture06/12/18
All offices want to hire as quickly as possible. There hasn' chuckrhoades06/12/18
Thanks so much for answering! I know it’s a long shot so l formyfuture06/13/18
Thanks for all the information. I applied to St. Louis but I purplemarker106/13/18
Yes. Everyone has a telework agreement in place and can tele chuckrhoades06/13/18
Could you touch on the differences between the work and day- startupesq06/17/18
formyfuture (Jun 10, 2018 - 9:57 am)

Hi all,

Wanted to start a thread for all those who applied for the EEOC trial attorney jobs that closed in late may. There were several vacancies across country. Any one get word from HR yet about referrals?

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fettywap (Jun 10, 2018 - 10:12 am)

I applied for that an investigator job. Heard back about 2 weeks ago that I would not get interviewed for the investigator job. Have not heard back about the attorney job.

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chuckrhoades (Jun 11, 2018 - 9:53 pm)

Investigator jobs are almost impossible to get unless you are a veteran or were in the peace corp.

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formyfuture (Jun 10, 2018 - 10:44 am)

Yes I’m wondering how long it will take. I imagine they want to hire before budget year ends sept 30th.

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chuckrhoades (Jun 11, 2018 - 9:55 pm)

I am a trial attorney at the EEOC. If you have any questions, ask away.

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chasman33 (Jun 12, 2018 - 8:46 am)

What’s the daily job like.do many cases actually end by jury verdict.? Also, what are the attorney-examiner positions like? For both jobs, do you need a strong background in employment law or will you will be trained? Thanks!

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chuckrhoades (Jun 12, 2018 - 7:56 pm)

Your day depends on your case load and the status of your cases. Lots of depositions, research and writing, motions and responses to motions, participating in court hearings and conferences, lots of discovery (drafting discovery and responding to discovery), meetings with claimants, speaking with witnesses and providing advice to investigators. Very few cases, a tiny percentage really, end by jury verdict. Most will settle. If you're an adrenaline junkie and want or need constant trial work, you are better off joining a public defender's office. Some offices have more trials than others, but there are not many trials generally.

With attorney-examiner positions, you are essentially a judge. You run your docket, conduct hearings, rule on discovery motions and write decisions. Many trial attorneys will want to get that position after they burn out. So, when you apply for that position, you are generally competing against people with a lot of experience and connections within that office. I think prior employment law experience is essential in that position.

But I don't think you need a strong background in employment law before becoming a trial attorney. It helps a lot if you have some litigation experience, but if you are smart, you can pick it up. That said, this also depends on the office. Hiring is decentralized. And the needs of the office will dictate what the office looks for in a candidate. Some offices care more about pedigree, while others care about employment experience, while others care about other factors (like general trial experience). I know of plenty of successful trial attorneys who had zero employment law experience when they were hired.

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formyfuture (Jun 12, 2018 - 10:49 am)

How much of a push does your office feel to hire? Does it take a long time? Job closed May 21st. Also, is it less competitive to get a position in some offices vs others?

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chuckrhoades (Jun 12, 2018 - 8:07 pm)

All offices want to hire as quickly as possible. There hasn't been a lot of hiring the last few years and, with attrition, numbers are low. Less hiring equals more work for everyone. Anything that can relieve that burden is good.

Headquarters gives each office the list of qualified candidates and then it's up to the office to decide whom to interview, schedule interviews, check references and make selections. Then headquarters has to approve the selection. The process can last 2-4 months. It took me about 4 months to go through the entire process. But I was called for an interview within about 1-1.5 months of the application cutoff date.

All offices are competitive, but some offices are more competitive than others. NY, Chicago and SF are probably the most competitive.

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formyfuture (Jun 13, 2018 - 7:32 am)

Thanks so much for answering! I know it’s a long shot so let’s see what ends up happening... with numbers low perhaps this means they will hire for multiple vacancies per office.

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purplemarker1 (Jun 13, 2018 - 10:12 am)

Thanks for all the information. I applied to St. Louis but I’m not too hopeful because one vacancy was shared between St. Louis and Kansas City.

@chuckroades: do you have the chance to telework at all? Thanks

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chuckrhoades (Jun 13, 2018 - 8:18 pm)

Yes. Everyone has a telework agreement in place and can telework as needed with prior approval. I don't know of many trial attorneys who have a regular telework schedule. A lot of investigators have a regular telework schedule. Most attorneys do it as needed. Some don't telework much at all. If you get your work done and your superiors are happy with you, no one will hassle you either way.

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startupesq (Jun 17, 2018 - 11:25 am)

Could you touch on the differences between the work and day-to-day of the Trial Attorney v. Examining Attorney v. General Attorney at the EEOC?

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