Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Is my situation unusual?

So, full disclosure before I begin: NO, I do NOT have a JD. dalocummelioribus06/26/18
I stopped reading after the first paragraph. So what's yo isthisit06/26/18
My question is: am I in a good position relative to the majo dalocummelioribus06/26/18
This isn't a validation forum. Who knows? What does this h esquirewalletsmatter06/26/18
Most people have debts but they also have families, homes, e doublefriedchicken06/26/18
Yes...which is why I feel strange in a sense. Thank you. dalocummelioribus06/26/18
You should ask your question in the dome, where it can be fu doublefriedchicken06/26/18
Oh I just noticed there's an off topic section! My apologies dalocummelioribus06/26/18
Your situation is not unusual. The poor often don't have de jeffm06/26/18
I am in a similar situation as you. No debt at all, zero deb ternarydaemon06/26/18
First of all, your paralegal certification is not "invalid" onehell06/26/18
This thread reminds of an old Kenny Rogers and the First Edi wutwutwut06/26/18
TITCR and great song. The Dude abides. esquirewalletsmatter06/26/18
Sounds like you're trying to make yourself feel better about favorandgrace06/26/18
Favorandgrace: I don't think owing a mortgage is favorable a dalocummelioribus06/26/18
Onehell: I do speak more than 1 language, yes. I will answe dalocummelioribus06/26/18
onehell: I cannot use my Paralegal certificate from Europe h dalocummelioribus06/26/18
Glad to find an akin soul in this forum. I think you just an ternarydaemon06/26/18
I'll admit, my dear ternarydaemon, that I haven't read a goo dalocummelioribus06/26/18
no, you are screwed. you are the last generation in your lin whiteguyinchina06/27/18
What you say is true if you buy strongly into the rat race. jeffm06/27/18
In defense of the rat race, I will note that there is an age onehell06/28/18
If you are materialistic, it is inevitable that you feel you jeffm06/29/18
Who said anything about living lavishly? Of course you shoul onehell06/29/18
Moved to bottom. jeffm06/30/18
You are assuming that the OP wants to have children. ternarydaemon06/28/18
I think you main mistake here is an excess of confort zone, ternarydaemon06/28/18
This post hits hard, perfect summary. mtbislife06/29/18
OP - I don't think your situation is unusual but I do think tcpaul06/28/18
Ok a few things: Whiteguyinchina: I neither have children dalocummelioribus06/28/18
Many posters here are reprehending you for living for the da ternarydaemon06/28/18
Your situation is not unusual. This thread is. It is also jd4hire06/28/18
I didn't realize there was an OT section, so that's why I po dalocummelioribus06/28/18
Here is a gold star: * superttthero06/28/18
I must need monitor adjustment. It looks like a black star t wutwutwut06/28/18
It's a gold star in an unusual situation. superttthero06/28/18
Haha, actually laughed out loud on that one. wutwutwut06/28/18
I have this bleak view of the world in 40-50 years. resource whiteguyinchina06/28/18
@ternary: Yes, that's right. A lot of them are so invested i dalocummelioribus06/29/18
/r Iamverysmart junkwired06/29/18
A couple items from y experience. "I am proud to have NO cre ternarydaemon06/29/18
Almost no one I know has student debt, and most people by ag skankhunt4206/29/18
Life’s good at Daddy LLP esquirewalletsmatter06/29/18
still holds true, in any career I can think of skankhunt4206/29/18
"Most people by age 30 earn six figures." LOL ROFL junkwired06/29/18
I imagine he is talking about his peers. Certainly not the jeffm06/29/18
For centuries, men lived without all these things that make whiteguyinchina06/30/18
"... I will note that there is an age at which poverty loses jeffm06/30/18
didnt end well for mr christ defensivelawyer06/30/18
He should have worked harder and saved more. jeffm06/30/18

dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 6:59 am)

So, full disclosure before I begin: NO, I do NOT have a JD. I have worked as Paralegal though both in the US and outside the US and I do have a Paralegal recognition certificate that is valid in Euroland, but NOT here for the obvious reason that law qualifications don't usually transfer easily. I have a B.Sc in a very good field and a Masters in the same...but due to the fact that I, admittedly, was always very much somewhat more of a drifter/thinker than a professionally-oriented person, I have never been able to hold down a long-term job, despite my degrees.

I have ZERO student loan debts though and ZERO debts period - no credit card debts, no nothing. Currently, I do not own a home but will inherit one so that's not an immediate concern at this point. I have medical insurance as well and I'm in my 30's. My question is, am I in an unusual situation? I ask because it seems to be both on here and in life in the USA, most people my age are saddled with student debt, although they do have a job...a more steady job. I work in a lower wage job currently (just to have something to do for the Summer since it's a temp job) and feel like even though I do not make a high hourly wage, I live pretty well compared to those with families or debts.

I have no housing costs, no car expenses...the only thing I pay is electric, phone and internet. My health insurance is covered.

I am looking for a better job, either in my field or as a Paralegal, but that has most certainly not been easy because employers don't seem to like the fact that I've lived in too many different places and don't really have a specific career track. I did start my own business in my field and I've been able to offer a service...sometimes I do get clients and get paid pretty well for it...BUT...I don't have good marketing skills so most of the people I've found are word of mouth, etc.

Thanks for reading

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isthisit (Jun 26, 2018 - 9:09 am)

I stopped reading after the first paragraph.

So what's your question exactly?

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 9:13 am)

My question is: am I in a good position relative to the majority of the average worker ? It just seems to me most people are in debt and I haven't yet really come across anyone debt free...esp. my age and no student loans...but maybe it's just my impression.

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esquirewalletsmatter (Jun 26, 2018 - 9:40 am)

This isn't a validation forum. Who knows? What does this have to do with the practice of law? If you want, here's to a good job!

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doublefriedchicken (Jun 26, 2018 - 9:38 am)

Most people have debts but they also have families, homes, etc.

You seem to be able to live a life free of obligations. We congratulate you.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 9:47 am)

Yes...which is why I feel strange in a sense. Thank you.

Esquire: I'd prefer you say "I've got a job for you!" I'll gladly send my resume.

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doublefriedchicken (Jun 26, 2018 - 10:40 am)

You should ask your question in the dome, where it can be fully “analyzed”.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 11:02 am)

Oh I just noticed there's an off topic section! My apologies. Can a moderator please move my question to the proper section?

Thank you

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jeffm (Jun 26, 2018 - 11:51 am)

Your situation is not unusual. The poor often don't have debt because they are not credit-worthy. There is a small chunk of working credit-worthy people without debt. There is a larger number of retired people without debt.

Being debt-free is nice.

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ternarydaemon (Jun 26, 2018 - 1:17 pm)

I am in a similar situation as you. No debt at all, zero debt (credit cards, health, no mortgage, no car, etc.), work on my own, average income but very low expenses, have health insurance, no retirement savings, mid 30s, no spouse or children, excellent health.

If you compare yourself to the average college-educated millennial, then, yes, your situation is unusual. They have enough debt for a couple decades, live on expensive cities where rent and local taxes take up 50% of their paycheck, earning 40k per year.

Then again, if you compare yourself to a professional trucker driver, oil welder or redneck farmer (not pejoratively), then you are not only average but below-average, as such persons most likely earn more than you do, have larger equity, even real assets like the farmer, who may own land and equipment worth a couple millions, while paying low taxes and even receiving government subsidies. For them, you might as well be poor.

My work story is similar to you: not a team player, individualist, compared to my peers, quite frankly I am brilliant but I tend so much to be a drifter/thinker that I could not care less about any fixed job or boss.

Employers will rarely look at you, since you lack debt, mortgage or children that chains you, and are used to work by yourself in your 30s. You most likely have many useful skills and abilities that differentiate you from the rest of the lemmings; so your bet is to sell your products services in person and online. You may not get comparatively rich initially, but I know many guys that make about 60k per year online and via many hustles, with minimal expenses and working 4 hours a day or less.

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onehell (Jun 26, 2018 - 1:37 pm)

First of all, your paralegal certification is not "invalid" outside of Euroland. It's neither valid nor invalid, because paralegal is not a licensed profession in the USA, outside of some states that certify independent paralegals to prepare documents for people to file pro per.

My point is that the value of your experience and credential (or lack thereof) is up to a prospective employer. So sell it, and yourself. Rather than just assuming its irrelevant, make the case that it is relevant.

Employers don't generally care whether you're in debt or not, unless you're in default and the employer is of the type that runs a credit check which most don't. So the fact that you have no student loans is in itself neither an advantage nor a disadvantage in the job market.

If what you're looking to overcome is a history of job (and country) hopping, well there is an indeed an old adage that world travel is "great for the soul but terrible for the resume." Best you can do is keep plugging away and hope someone eventually sees your world travels as being something that makes you an interesting person. Maybe try applying to be a paralegal at a practice that values international exposure, like immigration or something. Did you pick up any foreign languages in all your travels? That'd be a big asset.

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wutwutwut (Jun 26, 2018 - 1:40 pm)

This thread reminds of an old Kenny Rogers and the First Edition song my parents liked:

I Just Dropped In... To See What Condition My Condition Was In ...

Yeah, yeah, ooooo-oh yeaaa-aah... ...what condition my condition was in.

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esquirewalletsmatter (Jun 26, 2018 - 3:03 pm)

TITCR and great song. The Dude abides.

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favorandgrace (Jun 26, 2018 - 2:45 pm)

Sounds like you're trying to make yourself feel better about your lackluster job situation. Sorry, you aren't special. Me and both of my brothers are in similar situations, except we all have steady good jobs and we are homeowners, our only debt being our mortgages. And we are in our 20's.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 3:35 pm)

Favorandgrace: I don't think owing a mortgage is favorable at all (to me)...Sorry. It ties you down. Also, I don't technically own a home but I have no mortgage OR rent payments either.

ternary: Very interesting and I agree with many of your points. Right now my main lacking is assets...but then again, those red neck farmers are very much tied to their location and there's increasingly very little market value (relatively speaking) in rural areas...no matter how many tractors or land they own.

Yes, right now when times go well for my skills, I have made very good money working as little as 4 hours a day. I just need to get more clients to have a steady flow.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 3:36 pm)

Onehell: I do speak more than 1 language, yes. I will answer you in more detail later.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 6:04 pm)

onehell: I cannot use my Paralegal certificate from Europe here, though. That's what I meant.Sure, I can mention it (and I often do) but a typical response is "oh, interesting". It is not a relevant qualification to the vast majority of American law firms. I am in a state that does indeed certify paralegals, etc. And many law firms do ask for a paralegal certificate.

I'm actually very into immigration law and so I have worked in immigration before. I almost landed a job recently within that field, but was turned down for the very good reason that I needed to know, without training or any oversight, how to prepare specific visas I had not done previously.

Most of the reactions to me in interviews tend to be something like this: "oh, you're very well spoken", "interesting life", "fascinating job situations"...we shake hands and that's that.

ternary: I forgot to add, that yep, I have no retirement savings either (or a spouse/children) to worry about, thankfully. I don't know if I'm brilliant, but I do know that I have a prestigious degree from a very prestigious college and my grades were stellar. But, like you, I am just not very good at the daily grind and have thankfully been cushioned by personal circumstances so that I've never really HAD to work fully to survive unlike so many other people. On the other hand, despite my job situation, people see me as totally free of stress, with a full head of hair and they say I look way younger than my 30s.

And yes, I do think I am "poor" relative to a welder or subsidized redneck in say, Pa, but those are usually older guys and younger guys have usually always been poorer than their parents. The important thing, I think, is to lay a good groundwork for future savings. I can say most certainly though that I am happy not to be the average millennial drowning in debt and expenses.

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ternarydaemon (Jun 26, 2018 - 8:15 pm)

Glad to find an akin soul in this forum. I think you just answered your own question regarding your job interviews. Most employers, specially legal ones, want to hire boring, detail-oriented, risk averse persons that have not traveled 35 countries while freelancing. They do not care about your interesting life, adventures, anecdotes, etc. They want you to sit on your cubicle and churn out work, no questions asked; and much less to train you and then find out that you quit after a year because you plan to go to India again and work off your laptop 3 hours a day.

Even in Big-law, they want gunners that churn hours and have enough cocktail-talk to appease clients and, perhaps, someday generate connections or specialties that will generate revenue. They don't want you to be the person who slept with the crazy blonde aussie in a house on Bali, they want you to have membership to the same gym as the clients and partners, go to the same bars that the associates, dress with the same clothing brands, and to stand up for the team when you need to pull all nighters for two weeks straight.

Even more repulsive to potential employers, is your work ethic. They know that you know how to survive working some few hours a day, while sleeping, working out, eating nutritious food and having a happy, perfectly healthy and fulfilling life. Would you hire that person and insert it into a team of obese, debt-ridden, pill-addicted, stressed persons that work 10 hours a day and dream of going on an all-inclusive cruise for their 5 day vacation this year? Only a very lousy manager would do that...

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 26, 2018 - 8:55 pm)

I'll admit, my dear ternarydaemon, that I haven't read a good post like this in quite a while. While I will not dare say I am "the most interesting" person out there, I do notice quite a lot of dull people around me because of that lack of imagination, as you well put it. Most people in this country especially (but much of the West generally) are very focused on "Plan A - degree, then Step II, "family and marriage", job, etc. This seems to be the pattern for most. It's almost as if though they feel they absolutely MUST have "accomplishments" of that type.

What you say about training makes sense...why waste time on someone like me when they've got thousands and thousands of debt-punished interns very willing to work like slaves for peanuts?

And yes! I spend most of my days (except now that I found a pretty good EASY Summer stint virtually doing NOTHING and getting paid for it) eating excellent nutritious food, good wine or beer once in a while, living life...I'm in a 9 to 5 brief job now and I'm looking around me and it's EXACTLY what you say...if I may quote you...I will mention this to those who understand me: "a team of obese, debt-ridden, pill-addicted, stressed persons that work 10 hours a day and dream of going on an all-inclusive cruise for their 5 day vacation this year?" I also take naps when necessary, which is a big "no no" to the stressed or antsy bosses.

The irony is that even though I am far from being rich in the financial sense, I do live VERY well and most people who meet me think for some reason I am a boss or, as one chubby pill addicted Puerto Rican told me "even your tone of voice sounds to me like a rich white guy from old money" (I'm neither rich nor come from old money, but that's another story). The point is that yes, I know how to survive WITHOUT becoming a slave...but at the same time, I do want to have some backup money saved up, hence taking up odd jobs here and there. I will never live to work.

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whiteguyinchina (Jun 27, 2018 - 11:12 pm)

no, you are screwed. you are the last generation in your line to have this kind of contemplative life. your kids, should you have them, will likely live at the house you inherited. and once you are dead, they will piss through their inheritance and have no choice but to become the pill popping stressed wage slaves you scoff at.

the rest of the world is churning man, you just haven't felt the heat from that yet.

having no debts and not having to pay rent really frees you up. my brother was unemployed for like six years and lived great. but don't be fooled. you may be to stay out of the game for the rest of your life, but your children will suffer because of it.

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jeffm (Jun 27, 2018 - 11:49 pm)

What you say is true if you buy strongly into the rat race. Kids don't really need a whole lot of money. We never really had all that much when I was a kid. It didn't make a hill of difference. In fact, I look back with a sense of accomplishment, having become "upwardly socially mobile."

However, that game is really a rat race for not much of a valid reason when you don't have to try to spend your life satisfying other people's expectations. The kids will only suffer to the extent they buy into the rat race - and they very well might.

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onehell (Jun 28, 2018 - 7:11 pm)

In defense of the rat race, I will note that there is an age at which poverty loses its cool factor. It's one thing to traipse around Europe in your 20s and quite another to be the old guy at the hostel.

As long as there's been a society with norms, there have been people who think they have it all figured out, who think they've found a way to opt out of all of it. From Louisa May Alcott's utopian community in the 1800s to the free love hippy communes of the 1960s to today's tiny homes and travel blogs. But the utopian farm crop failed, the boomers grew out of the communes, and the tiny homes may look just awesome on HGTV but are illegal pretty much anywhere except an RV park which costs as much as an apartment if rented long term and exposes you to a much less "cool" variety of poor people. I also notice that the travel bloggers always seem to eventually pivot from whatever freelancing they were doing to marketing packages that try to sell their tips and tricks for living like they do. For example, every "virtual law practice" I've seen eventually pivots from practicing law for clients to selling other lawyers "how to become a legal nomad" packages. Notably absent from all these pitches is any mention of how to actually get legitimate permission to live or work abroad, because there is no such pathway for most. They're just living in a quasi-illegal fashion hopping from place to place on tourist visas. But your passport eventually fills up. Eventually some foreign official starts asking questions about why you don't seem to have a return ticket. Or your money just runs out.

The point is, it isn't sustainable. At some point, usually by their 30s or 40s, it loses its coolness to be the starving artist. "Poor" becomes "poverty." Google "work campers" to see what it looks like when you're still living like that in your 60s because you have no retirement savings.

Also, look around whilst traveling through one of these cool exotic places. They are not exotic places to the natives surrounding you as you walk down the street. For them, it's just home, and they probably do not live in a world where they have any expectation of the kind of "happiness" that the permatravelers often think is some kind of basic human right of which the rat race deprives people:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/not-everyone-wants-to-be-happy/

I applaud OP, who seems to be starting to realize that it's time to grow up, which is why they're looking for a job.

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jeffm (Jun 29, 2018 - 6:38 pm)

If you are materialistic, it is inevitable that you feel you must "outgrow" this notion of living cheaply. By definition, it's materialism which makes you outgrow your attempts to deny it.

Even most of the poor are materialistic. They'll spend their last welfare dollar on the latest cell phone.

I'm talking about people who don't aspire to that kind of "creature comfort" - the ones who decide certain levels of work and stress simply aren't worth what, to them, is honestly driven more by "conspicuous consumption" than it is satisfying a true need.

There are a lot of people like that.

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onehell (Jun 29, 2018 - 7:46 pm)

Who said anything about living lavishly? Of course you should live below your means. Way below your means if possible.

But you need to have a paid off home and a decent amount of retirement savings in your old age, or homelessness is a real risk. Wanting to not be homeless is far from materialism.

And by the way, it also isn't materialism that drives poor people to buy iphones. Keep in mind that it may be their only computer in a world where internet has become as essential as running water.

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jeffm (Jun 30, 2018 - 2:15 am)

Moved to bottom.

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ternarydaemon (Jun 28, 2018 - 5:23 pm)

You are assuming that the OP wants to have children.

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ternarydaemon (Jun 28, 2018 - 5:23 pm)

I think you main mistake here is an excess of confort zone, as taking a 9-5 job only to take the wage is a waste of time. The most valuable thing in life is time, not money.

I would recommend to hustle, hustle as much as you can. There are many ways to make money, that take less time and less investment that being a lawyer. Many posters here have condemned you for drifting in life, but you could retort that you are free, and they are just deeply plugged into the system.

Nonetheless, what you produce is measurable, and wasting some months on a crappy job is not excusable in the larger scheme of things of your whole life on this earth.

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mtbislife (Jun 29, 2018 - 6:21 pm)

This post hits hard, perfect summary.

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tcpaul (Jun 28, 2018 - 1:41 am)

OP - I don't think your situation is unusual but I do think it is bleak. I'd rather be in my 30s with debt and a career path than in your shoes. You appear to be living for today without a career path and no hope of eventual retirement. Not sure what you'll be doing at 60, 65, 70 and on... Doc review? Still paralegaling?

I mean, good for you. Live for today. I certainly don't have the balls to do that. (I did it in my 20s and went to law school when I was 29). I'm too afraid of the future. But if you can live without fear of the future and the consequences of your live for today life, do it.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 28, 2018 - 5:03 am)

Ok a few things:

Whiteguyinchina: I neither have children (thankfully) nor do I plan on having them...so no worries on that front.

Tcpaul: I have thought about the future, but it doesn't really intimidate me. How many people do you know who do have a, say, average career path have also a guaranteed pension? Social Security will likely go bust or be very much overhauled. Those who have a private pension plan will be in better shape, but not all.

For centuries, men lived without all these things that make men now so nervous. There was no SS, no retirement as a concept, no benefits. I do know that I will have a house and an income from that. I have no idea what will happen to me in my old age except the certainty of death at some point...but I'm not afraid of death either. You raise an interesting question, but I also think many of those who think they have job security and a secure future are very much deluded because in this global economy, nobody will be safe from the chopping board.

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ternarydaemon (Jun 28, 2018 - 5:30 pm)

Many posters here are reprehending you for living for the day, and the lack of plans for a career and retirement. This is true from the point of view of someone fully invested into the rat race and the legal industry, with debt, family and children.

Still, this fails to take into account the point of view of you and other posters, like me. Some people do not want to invest into the rat race, to have family, children or a fixed career.

Considering this, your situation is not bleak, but just of disconcerting freedom. On your shoulders hangs the weight of deciding your future, and only on you. Many posters here are quite risk-averse, even for the standards of lawyers; and a life with no real hurry, mostly free of the system, and without no one telling you what to do (your boss, the company, the government) surely instates into them the sensation of fear, unemployment and obsolescence. And that will be the destino of 90%+ of all lawyers living on earth right now.

The future will be of useful skills and very specialized professions. In 2035, I can guarantee you that it will be more useful and lucrative to be an experienced carpenter than most things taught now in any school. Most people in the US are just delaying the inevitable for another 20 years.

In a job interview, they ask you want do you want to be when you are xx years. Well, how do you see yourself when you are 45?

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jd4hire (Jun 28, 2018 - 8:03 am)

Your situation is not unusual. This thread is. It is also stupid.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 28, 2018 - 9:12 am)

I didn't realize there was an OT section, so that's why I posted it by mistake in this section. I asked the mods to move it (if there are any mods).

It's not a stupid topic though just because you don't like it.

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superttthero (Jun 28, 2018 - 9:49 am)

Here is a gold star: *

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wutwutwut (Jun 28, 2018 - 10:48 am)

I must need monitor adjustment. It looks like a black star to me.

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superttthero (Jun 28, 2018 - 10:57 am)

It's a gold star in an unusual situation.

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wutwutwut (Jun 28, 2018 - 12:05 pm)

Haha, actually laughed out loud on that one.

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whiteguyinchina (Jun 28, 2018 - 11:10 pm)

I have this bleak view of the world in 40-50 years. resources are already starting to get tight. it's only at the margins, but you will start seeing this more and more. then there is a chance of a cascading effect. like, all of a sudden a bunch of seafood dies off due to whatever.

then you have govt and company policies (you can call it trends too) to depreciate labor as much as possible. outsourcing, uber, fiver, automation.

so when the bottom drops out, i think it will drop out hard and fast, and those at the bottom will fall first.

the contemplative thinker of today will be the day laborer of tomorrow, in a world full of hungry mouths.

but if you have no intention to breed and are content for your line to die off, it's no big deal. just enjoy your time while you are here. screw the rest.

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dalocummelioribus (Jun 29, 2018 - 7:26 am)

@ternary: Yes, that's right. A lot of them are so invested into the "system" that they always ask about things which they for some reason think are a given, like pensions and retirement. The fact of the matter is that even millennials who ARE working and fully plugged into the system, are NOT saving for retirement. More than half of millennials are too much into debt and low salaries (if any) to even think about saving for retirement.

Social Security is NOT a given and if Republicans continue to win, there will be no long-term social security in America anyway. One thing that sometimes does affect me is that I am so used to being obligation free that I don't realize the vast number of people with children, family and so many debts (among other personal problems).

And yes, I have ZERO desire to have a family, wife or kids, etc. Most people criticize me for the reasons you state -- they think somehow I am obsolete or have a bleak future and yet they can't even guarantee their own Social Security or have a 30+ year mortgage + student loans. That sounds pretty bleak to me...and I can't wait when the government stops issuing passports to student debtors. The US will become a huge debtor's prison (it already is in some ways, given how very tied most Americans are to credit score, banks, etc). I am proud to have NO credit history. If you plug in my SS#, nothing comes up in credit reports.

Thankfully, my skills are (and will be) very much in demand since they are very specialized and Science/Math related.
.
I see myself that as I get older, in much better shape than when I was 20 and deluded with so many systematic lies about having to do A and B to be a "good person". Now, I sort of look around me on trains and see miserable faces, depression, drug addiction...a lot of misery out there...but I can't complain, honestly.

@Whiteguy: Yes, there is overpopulation (too many poor people are still ignorantly breeding) and not enough resources for all. Something will def. go bust. What they've done with cabs, via Uber etc...will eventually be done to lawyers...in fact, they are trying now or have been for some time to outsource certain legal services. I know that in some European countries, they have basically tried to strip the notary of all his/her powers (they are usually men though) when it comes to certain documents that now are being handled by private companies. Most "intellectual" jobs will be quickly wiped out permanently in the next decade or so.

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junkwired (Jun 29, 2018 - 9:48 am)

/r Iamverysmart

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ternarydaemon (Jun 29, 2018 - 4:42 pm)

A couple items from y experience. "I am proud to have NO credit history." If you have a math background, you can begin to build a good credit history, just in case. The system can be somewhat gamed... if you are smart enough. I have multiple credit cards with a large limit that I never use; just another cushion for emergencies.

Then again, in my country, the credit history is more limited in scope, unlike in the USA, where it seems is another means of social control, like the citizen score that exists in China. Funny thing, the Chinese system is compulsory, and the US one is not.

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skankhunt42 (Jun 29, 2018 - 4:59 pm)

Almost no one I know has student debt, and most people by age 30 earn six figures.

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esquirewalletsmatter (Jun 29, 2018 - 5:14 pm)

Life’s good at Daddy LLP

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skankhunt42 (Jun 29, 2018 - 5:38 pm)

still holds true, in any career I can think of

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junkwired (Jun 29, 2018 - 6:33 pm)

"Most people by age 30 earn six figures."

LOL ROFL

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jeffm (Jun 29, 2018 - 6:48 pm)

I imagine he is talking about his peers. Certainly not the 35 year-old bartender who serves him.

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whiteguyinchina (Jun 30, 2018 - 1:02 am)

For centuries, men lived without all these things that make men now so nervous. There was no SS, no retirement as a concept, no benefits.


buddy, that's why people raised tons of kids back then. that was their social security.

u do not want to be a poor old w no family, trust me.

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jeffm (Jun 30, 2018 - 2:19 am)

"... I will note that there is an age at which poverty loses its cool factor. It's one thing to traipse around Europe in your 20s and quite another to be the old guy at the hostel... I applaud OP, who seems to be starting to realize that it's time to grow up..."

This is so common a criticism that it practically pervades our society.

Copping-out of the rat race is not exactly without long-standing precedent:

So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ 32For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. 33But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. 34Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

http://biblehub.com/niv/matthew/6.htm

In here, you don't see a ringing endorsement to, "[s]eek a 2,000 ft2 home to own outright."

I suppose both camps can argue about what "seek first his kingdom and his righteousness" means, but if the speaker of these words has any authority on the topic, it looks pretty clear to me that there is no universal imperative that adults must "outgrow" copping-out of the rat race.

It doesn't say, "Don't seek material things." Seek them if you aspire to them.

It says, "Don't worry about material things." I know not worrying is easier said than done, but the imperative still remains, no matter how difficult it is to abide.

"You should worry" is not a valid reason to judge a person who is unconcerned about seeking material things.

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defensivelawyer (Jun 30, 2018 - 9:13 am)

didnt end well for mr christ

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jeffm (Jun 30, 2018 - 9:56 am)

He should have worked harder and saved more.

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