Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Practicing for 4 months. Planning my escape from law.

Got shit grades from a low ranked public T2. Failed the bar overqualified01/16/12
$37K and no benefits...you should be living it up. Why on ea newtoboard9901/16/12
i made a whopping $10,000 my first four months as a solo pri mississippilawyer01/16/12
Me. Went into the skilled trades. Hated law. Hid the utt thedetroiter01/16/12
1099? shady shady... unfrozenlawyer01/16/12
Newtoboard, I'm not going to name my school but it's in the overqualified01/16/12
Unfrozen, you're my hero. First, the snl skit, I assume you overqualified01/16/12
And yes the 1099 thing is shady overqualified01/16/12
I love that guy too. Yeh, the 1099 (especially when att unfrozenlawyer01/16/12
Mississippi, Its not the hours or the pay that bothers me as overqualified01/16/12
Thats basically what I'm doing. I used to write MSJs too fo unfrozenlawyer01/16/12
Unfrozen, you're getting a computer science degree, correct? OhioDocReviewer01/16/12
I'm taking classes in computer information systems. I will unfrozenlawyer01/16/12
I think being an attorney can be pretty awesome if you find Frida201/16/12
Congrats, Frida! What kind of work are you doing now? Workin cranky01/16/12
Nonprofit, actually. The same one I had been doing contract Frida201/16/12
Sounds a good job w/a nice title. Glad to hear your contract cranky01/17/12
Yes, I am amazed still. I love my job. It is pretty crazy th Frida201/17/12
i implore you to work for someone else before trying it alon mississippilawyer01/16/12
@Mississipppi Lawyer- What states are you licensed in? t mordecai01/16/12
I meant to post the above post in another thread. It is not mississippilawyer01/16/12
@ Mississippi Lawyer, thanks for the reply. If one wishe mordecai01/17/12
I am in the Memphis area. I worked in a firm that also pract Vanity01/17/12
There is plenty of work in Mississippi ... you just have to mississippilawyer01/17/12
I think that my problem is the fact that I would be Tennesse Vanity01/18/12
Me. I worked in journalism and academia and love both. But blackpappy01/16/12
i am astonished at how many smart, talented licensed attorne mississippilawyer01/16/12
OP: my first job sucked balls too. I was making $ 29K in a s AssociateX01/16/12
I have the connections to get a generally low stress, 40 hr overqualified01/16/12
"I can't do this for 10 years just to make 70k at the end of upstategrad01/16/12
this^^^ mordecai01/16/12
Correction: if I worked as an attorney and busted my ass for overqualified01/17/12
"Who else has left law and not regretted it for a single min BigSal01/16/12
What's your exit plan Bigsal? overqualified01/16/12
Med school. See http://www.jdunderground.com/ot/thr ead.php? BigSal01/16/12
Dartmouth Undergrad, Wisconsin Law, now Med School. If CNN d mordecai01/17/12
Tried the pre-med thing. After the first test (scored 69% in Soothesayer901/17/12
That story definitely never happened. You are to blame for TheImmigrant01/17/12
I remember my gen chem I class at Wisconsin shrunk by like 1 BigSal01/18/12
In the great scope of things how bad would $100k in loans be overqualified01/17/12
Nobody really talks real numbers in any of these threads. SmallLawGuy01/17/12
Wow, I totally didn't think you would this angle...I thought unfrozenlawyer01/17/12
You probably do things that can get you disbarred but either worseoffthanaplumber01/17/12
If I am, it's more the former. SmallLawGuy01/17/12
Your success is very impressive. From reading my state bar bbkbbk01/17/12
Smalllawguy, congratulations on hustling and making a decent cranky01/17/12
The stress is induced mostly from having to deal with the cl SmallLawGuy01/18/12
Stress is also derived from the following: Felony trial 3 we SmallLawGuy01/18/12
I don't feel comfortable posting real numbers here based on mississippilawyer01/17/12
You're absolutely right. Devotion is the operative word here SmallLawGuy01/18/12
Small Law, thanks for posting your numbers. Congrats on doin overqualified01/17/12
If you're sure about your other job prospects (what kind of cranky01/17/12
I don't want to name the school, specific location, or field overqualified01/18/12
I'm becoming a law librarian. It only took me one year of la Chunka01/17/12
I bailed after 16 years as a solo. I basically snapped -- i Donatus01/19/12
How did you get out? And specifically, how do you do investm worseoffthanaplumber01/19/12
getting out was easy....one day I just locked the door to th Donatus01/21/12
Such a great thread. Wonder what ML is up to now. snowday7507/03/18
Protesting to get 15 dollar an hour minimum wage. esquirewalletsmatter07/05/18
Get an SSA decision writer job. Least lawyer-like job that r lawst07/04/18

overqualified (Jan 16, 2012 - 8:37 am)

Got shit grades from a low ranked public T2. Failed the bar first time and am now employed in true shitlaw making $37k as a 1099 and no benefits. My debt load isn't bad but I hate practicing law and have begun planning my escape. My significant other supports me as long as I do it in the most financially responsible way. Who else has left law and not regretted it for a single minute?

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newtoboard99 (Jan 16, 2012 - 8:53 am)

$37K and no benefits...you should be living it up. Why on earth are you leaving this awesome profession? BTW, how long ago did you graduate? Care to be a little more specific about which school you went to? What area of the country have you practiced in?

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mississippilawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:31 am)

i made a whopping $10,000 my first four months as a solo prior to getting hired at a shitlaw firm, where I didnt make much until I started to bring in cases. You will make more money in time in you stay the course. New lawyers hate how little they make after reading that some make over $160k in biglaw. What many ignore is that the $160k big law jobs account for .0000001 percent of law jobs. Most law jobs for new lawyers are in shitlaw firms where you are worked like a slave.

If you have a bar license and law degree, you are pretty much pigeonholed into being a lawyer.

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thedetroiter (Jan 16, 2012 - 6:40 pm)

Me.

Went into the skilled trades. Hated law. Hid the utterly useless and toxic JD under the part-time job I had while in school. Haven't looked back. Don't let anyone tell you you are stuck with something you hate. Some like it, some don't, and it's not a right/wrong thing.

Life's too short to do something you don't like. It is that simple. Not so simple to hide the dreaded JD, though, I am cognizant of that fact. That's one of the biggest problems I have with law degrees--they close more doors than they open, I don't care what anyone says.

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unfrozenlawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:16 am)

1099? shady shady...

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overqualified (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:23 am)

Newtoboard, I'm not going to name my school but it's in the Midwest and I currently live in a massive southern metro area. I graduated in may 2010.

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overqualified (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:25 am)

Unfrozen, you're my hero. First, the snl skit, I assume you are named after, was hilarious. Second, I'm pretty sure you got your ticket out of law and haven't looked back since.

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overqualified (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:29 am)

And yes the 1099 thing is shady

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unfrozenlawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:35 am)

I love that guy too.

Yeh, the 1099 (especially when attorneys do it) IS A HUGE pet peeve of mine. I can't stand it. I just quit my temporary 1099 job, but mostly 'cause it was stupid.

I'm still working on my ticket.

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overqualified (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:40 am)

Mississippi, Its not the hours or the pay that bothers me as much as the work itself. I hate writing MSJ's and frankly am terrible at it. What's worse is my significant other has a freaking awesome job that pays $83k plus bonus and benefits and isn't stressed out on a daily basis. My plan involves going back to school and getting into that line of work. I know that you are a very successful solo and god bless you for that. I'm looking for "I left law and am loving it" stories in order to confirm that I'm making the right decision. I know where the high quality careers are, and it's not in law.

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unfrozenlawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:44 am)

Thats basically what I'm doing. I used to write MSJs too for 40k and no benefits. Loved writing the MSJs, but trial work sucks butt.

Sucks though to have spent 3+ years in law just to learn it sucks and makes you poor, huh?

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OhioDocReviewer (Jan 16, 2012 - 11:04 am)

Unfrozen, you're getting a computer science degree, correct? How tough is that field to break into? What's the employment outlook for CS grads? How long does it take to finish the program? What are the math requirements? I got through college algebra and that's about it.

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unfrozenlawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 1:05 pm)

I'm taking classes in computer information systems. I will be applying to a masters program in computer security this spring. I had all the math required for the program because I got up to Calculus 2 in college and THANK GAWD 'cause I suck at math and I think I'm dumber in it now then I was 10 years ago.

Honestly, I think this field, information systems/databases/security, will be hard for me to break into. I'm hoping to leverage my law background into working for a e-discovery software developer and eventually start my own consulting firm. BUT I wouldn't be surprised if I'm still underemployed and WAY WAY WAY overeducated at 40.

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Frida2 (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:55 am)

I think being an attorney can be pretty awesome if you find the right type of attorney job. For example at a non profit, government, or quality of life firm like what AssociateX does. But there are WAY more people looking for these jobs than jobs available. Very few can be truly happy and successful as solos, but god bless those that can. Working for small firms or solos, especially as a 1099, is usually miserable.

I got a full time attorney job a few months ago (the awesome kind) but before that I was an underemployed attorney for about five years (also had a couple kids during those five years). I almost started a non attoney job about a year ago but it was for a government contractor and the funding did not go through - after I had already done the background check and everything - so that sucked at the time. In the end I am glad that other job did not go through because the attorney job I have now pays more and I don't have to explain to people why I'm not working as a lawyer like I would have had to.

I don't really have any advice for you because there is no simple answer and like everything in life luck plays a huge role - but good luck figuring it out!

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cranky (Jan 16, 2012 - 5:28 pm)

Congrats, Frida! What kind of work are you doing now? Working for a law firm or gov't?

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Frida2 (Jan 16, 2012 - 5:35 pm)

Nonprofit, actually. The same one I had been doing contract work for, but now I'm a staff attorney.

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cranky (Jan 17, 2012 - 10:26 pm)

Sounds a good job w/a nice title. Glad to hear your contracting work paid off.

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Frida2 (Jan 17, 2012 - 11:23 pm)

Yes, I am amazed still. I love my job. It is pretty crazy that all those years of contract work finally paid off. I wasn't counting on it.

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mississippilawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 2:56 pm)

i implore you to work for someone else before trying it alone. it is a very competitive, dog-eat-dog world in the lawyer world. Lawyers are happy to eat their own, and then joke and laugh about it later. It is highly competitive, but if you can reach the top, there is a lot of money to be made. Problem is, it takes some luck, timing and a mix of good business sense and good lawyering to get there.

Smart lawyers are a dime a dozen. There are lots of lawyers who post here that are probably smarter than I am whose practice is primarily limited to doc. review, like: cowgod, blackpappy, ohiodocreviewer ... and there are many, many more.

If it was the 1960s again, I would say, go for it. Build your practice and be patient. However, now with outsourcing and a race to the bottom with lawyer fees and a hoard of baby boomer lawyers who will never retire, being a lawyer is not the best field to be in and will not be for the foreseeable future.

I graduated in the middle of my law school class 5 years ago, no law review, no anything. I worked during law school and gained valuable practice tips that I knew I would have to use since there was no way I would ever get a job at a white shoe firm. I was not a gunner in law school, but I turned into one once I passed the bar.

My first 4 years of practice, I availed myself of every single opportunity I could find to make myself more valuable. I took every single deposition I could, I tried cases when they wouldnt settle, I began watching how other lawyers took depositions and tried cases, I went to as many CLE's as I could afford, ect. I took other states' bar exams and passed them. The first 4 years were awful. Can you imagine teaching yourself Louisiana's Civil Code and having a full caseload at the same time? It was not uncommon for my average work day to start at 7 AM and work to 10 PM or 11 PM at night, five or six days a week.

However, after 3 or 4 years, I started to figure out how to do some things, was making more contacts, and was starting to get some degree of respect from attorneys on the other side and judges because they knew I would try a case, and they knew that I knew how to try a case. At this time, and after I paid off all my student loans and had some cash in the bank, did I decide to make the leap to become a solo. I had a small book of cases I took, but even then it was scary.

Dual licenses helped out a lot since I was not limited to one geographic area, and I ended up working out very good of counsel arrangement with larger firms who needed an attorney licensed in multiple states. The white shoes never would have hired me as a new lawyer. However, as a 5th year attorney, I had just as much experience as the white shoe's lifelong associates, and I was able to handle matters in more states.

Thus, from my experience, if you dont get biglaw or a decent law firm job, you will need to spend the next five years saving money, paying down debt, and immersing yourself in law practice if you want to survive. Most people dont want to do this, and I cant blame them. Who the hell wants to work 80-90 hours per week in the prime of their lives for little to no money for 5 years?

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mordecai (Jan 16, 2012 - 9:53 pm)

@Mississipppi Lawyer- What states are you licensed in?

thank you

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mississippilawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:56 pm)

I meant to post the above post in another thread. It is not responsive to op's inquiry, but I got sidetracked at my office today.

Anyway, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana and I am taking the Tennessee bar exam soon.

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mordecai (Jan 17, 2012 - 12:44 am)

@ Mississippi Lawyer, thanks for the reply.

If one wishes to practice in Memphis would it be beneficial to be licensed in Tennessee, Arkansas, and Mississippi?

What was the reason(s) for choosing your states to be licensed in? Plantiff friendly? Job Opportunities?

There needs to be a thread about this.. Multi state licenses. Thanks Again!

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Vanity (Jan 17, 2012 - 2:14 am)

I am in the Memphis area. I worked in a firm that also practiced in Mississippi. There is no business in Mississippi, as far as Tippah and DeSoto counties are concerned. Most of your "opportunities" will come from standing around in criminal court hoping to be appointed.

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mississippilawyer (Jan 17, 2012 - 8:37 am)

There is plenty of work in Mississippi ... you just have to know where to look and be affiliated with the right group.

To mord - I took a bunch of bar exams to make myself mobile if the economy worsened and I had to leave my area. I correctly predicted in 2007 that this would happen, and I hedged my bets accordingly. Thankfully, it worked out well.

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Vanity (Jan 18, 2012 - 3:47 pm)

I think that my problem is the fact that I would be Tennessee lawyer with a Mississippi license, and not a Mississippi lawyer with Tennessee license. :)

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blackpappy (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:44 am)

Me. I worked in journalism and academia and love both. But I still practice, LOL If you call document review practicing.

My advice is not to look at it so much as leaving or staying in law. You passed the bar and you are a lawyer. Very many benefits can come from that fact. You don't hate being a lawyer, you hate your work. So move towards finding work that makes you satisfied, legal or otherwise.

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mississippilawyer (Jan 16, 2012 - 11:12 am)

i am astonished at how many smart, talented licensed attorneys can not find meaningful legal jobs.

Lawyers are a group that will, as a whole, eat their own and many actually find pleasure in doing so. Why? Because lawyering has turned into a business, and is no longer a gentleman's profession as it once was. If I could turn back time, I would have loved to practiced in the 60s and 70s in Mississippi. The Courts were not littered with unnecessary rules which delay proceedings and justice, there were more trials, the Bar was smaller and more collegial, lawyers were respected by the masses, and it was more fun to practice law.

The business model of the billable hour and its ilk has done more to ruin law practice than anything else, imo. Lawyers had to think of ways to take more time to do mundane tasks so they could legitimately get paid for their time. If I was the master of the universe, many of our disputes (if we could not first work them out amongst ourselves informally) would be settled by small jury trials of our peer (as our forefathers desired) without all the bullshit and unnecessary rules of court we have. This doesnt mean abolishing evidence rules, but rather relaxing them to encourage trial by jury. I find that, most often, clients just want to be heard, and there is no better chance to be heard than at a trial by a jury of your peers.

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AssociateX (Jan 16, 2012 - 11:12 am)

OP: my first job sucked balls too. I was making $ 29K in a shitlaw insurance defense in-house law firm and worked crazy long hours (usually on Saturdays because the firm's partners didnt do jack shit out of sheer laziness and the claims people were so damn disorganized). I failed the bar numerous times and instead of getting canned, they kept me on as some type of Perma-Paralegal at the salary of $37K with no raises in sight. I worked that way for about 3+ years until I managed to pass the bar and then lateral to other firms.

Now I am at a mid $80K base salary w/ benefits and decent QOL, but it took almost a decade of SHITJOBS to get here..(although I am still doing the same type of work I was doing at my 1st firm, the difference is I am now admitted and have seniority at my firm).

It seems thats the only way to move up if you dont get into BigLaw from the get go, or manage to get in as some type of lateral.

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overqualified (Jan 16, 2012 - 11:28 am)

I have the connections to get a generally low stress, 40 hr week, 2-3 weeks real vacation, $100k job in a few years. I have to go back to school and do reasonably well but my path out of law exists. My parents will bitch but they haven't put more than a few thousand dollars over the last decade towards my education so I don feel bad. I can't do this for 10 years just to make 70k at the end of the day. I would killself.

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upstategrad (Jan 16, 2012 - 4:59 pm)

"I can't do this for 10 years just to make 70k at the end of the day."

I would do just about any job for 70k/day. Assuming 250 work days a year, that's $17,500,000/year!

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mordecai (Jan 16, 2012 - 10:07 pm)

this^^^

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overqualified (Jan 17, 2012 - 8:43 am)

Correction: if I worked as an attorney and busted my ass for 10 years, $70k a year wouldn't be worth it.

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BigSal (Jan 16, 2012 - 12:08 pm)

"Who else has left law and not regretted it for a single minute?"

I haven't left yet but will be leaving the doc review circuit in August.

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overqualified (Jan 16, 2012 - 12:52 pm)

What's your exit plan Bigsal?

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BigSal (Jan 16, 2012 - 1:48 pm)

Med school. See http://www.jdunderground.com/ot/thread.php?threadId=22077

It took me years to pull this switch off.

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mordecai (Jan 17, 2012 - 12:56 am)

Dartmouth Undergrad, Wisconsin Law, now Med School. If CNN does a "Native American in America" series, theyd better interview you..

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Soothesayer9 (Jan 17, 2012 - 1:06 am)

Tried the pre-med thing. After the first test (scored 69% in chem), the teacher mutters next to me after handing the tests back, "well, I did my job" to which I ask, "which is...?" and he says "to get rid of two thirds of the class"

In any other business that would be called Fraud.

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TheImmigrant (Jan 17, 2012 - 4:25 pm)

That story definitely never happened. You are to blame for your own idiocy. Each and every day, several dozen clueless girls from the suburbs become dermatologists.

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BigSal (Jan 18, 2012 - 10:00 am)

I remember my gen chem I class at Wisconsin shrunk by like 10-25 percent after the first exam. My friends said the same thing happened at Dartmouth.

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overqualified (Jan 17, 2012 - 8:41 am)

In the great scope of things how bad would $100k in loans be if you and your spouse made $200k together? Even after 4 years of reduced income from going back to school, I don't think it would be that bad.

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SmallLawGuy (Jan 17, 2012 - 3:48 pm)

Nobody really talks real numbers in any of these threads.

Here are mine:

Graduated from an unaccredited Northeast TTTTT school in 2009.

Immediately opened office with partner. I'm responsible for over 90% of the office revenue.


Year One: Grossed 50K- Netted 0

Year Two (2011): Grossed 120k - Netted 80k

I hustle each and every day and constantly look for angles on cases that other attorneys wouldn't dare take on. I take on shit cases and I get clients to pay. The results are often disastrous and the client almost always becomes the enemy. I am a weak to below-average litigator and am definitely dumber than 90% of other attorneys out there but I make ends meet.

I've grown accustomed to stress and constant trouble on the horizon.

If you can't sell and aren't loaded do not even attempt to do this.

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unfrozenlawyer (Jan 17, 2012 - 4:14 pm)

Wow, I totally didn't think you would this angle...I thought you were boasting, until...thanks!

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worseoffthanaplumber (Jan 17, 2012 - 4:34 pm)

You probably do things that can get you disbarred but either i) do not know it or ii) do not care.

Both attributes are becoming an advantage in this profession.

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SmallLawGuy (Jan 17, 2012 - 5:13 pm)

If I am, it's more the former.

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bbkbbk (Jan 17, 2012 - 8:00 pm)

Your success is very impressive. From reading my state bar journal it seems like you have to actively steal money to get disbarred. If you got disbarred for fucking up there wouldn't be any lawyers left.

Where does the stress come from? Is it litigation deadlines, client shit, business shit?
I'm seriously thinking about opening up my own practice and I think that it will be more stressful than being an employee but also more rewarding in a lot of ways. I suppose that is a cliche. 80k is pretty good.

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cranky (Jan 17, 2012 - 10:33 pm)

Smalllawguy, congratulations on hustling and making a decent income as a new solo. I like your quote, "the client almost always becomes the enemy." This I find to be one of the main sources of stress for me as an attorney, especially now that I am solo. It does make you bitter and cynical about people when clients go Dr. Jekyll-Mr. Hyde on you. First, they are usually so happy that you will represent them, then they get all pissy and blame you when you ask for more money and/or don't get a miracle in their case, as they believe they deserve. It doesn't help when other attorneys act like moronic, devious asses to you. At least I don't have to deal with bosses any more, which can make you feel like you can't count on anyone.

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SmallLawGuy (Jan 18, 2012 - 10:17 am)

The stress is induced mostly from having to deal with the clients when shit inevitably hits the fan, the retainer is gone, and I move to withdraw my appearance. When I started I was so naive and really believed in some sense of fiduciary duty to the client.

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SmallLawGuy (Jan 18, 2012 - 10:30 am)

Stress is also derived from the following: Felony trial 3 weeks away; I've done little to nothing on the case, but billed like I have been; 5k retainer is gone (can't withdraw), and I have no fucking clue what I'm doing.

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mississippilawyer (Jan 17, 2012 - 11:05 pm)

I don't feel comfortable posting real numbers here based on some posters revealing the identity of others on this board. Law has been kind to me, but it takes luck and a devotion to the practice of law and sense. If you don't have all 3, law may not be very profitable.

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SmallLawGuy (Jan 18, 2012 - 10:18 am)

You're absolutely right. Devotion is the operative word here.

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overqualified (Jan 17, 2012 - 4:27 pm)

Small Law, thanks for posting your numbers. Congrats on doing well, 80k profit only a couple of years out is impressive. I have very high respect for ppl like you and mississippilawyer. Truth be told, I'm a terrible litigator and hate the hustle and stress of practice. I enjoy discussing the merits of certain arguments and cases, in general, but otherwise hate the grind of practicing. I liked LS except for the arbitrary nature of finals and despised bar prep. Anyway, here are my numbers:$37 salary, $4k savings, $33 student loan debt, $15k car loan, $5k credit card. I can go back to school and by June 2016 be making $100k with a very bright future and much less stress. Question is, would it be worth it. I would be in my lower 30s by 2016.

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cranky (Jan 17, 2012 - 10:35 pm)

If you're sure about your other job prospects (what kind of school would you attend?), then heck yes, take this other route. Nothing wrong with realizing that the law sucks and is not for you.

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overqualified (Jan 18, 2012 - 9:18 am)

I don't want to name the school, specific location, or field for fear of Outing myself but the area is known for having high entry level salaries and very good career prospects (vacation, time off, employer takes care of employees, etc.). If I can finish in the field then it would practically guarantee me a job, and if I could get a 3.0 I would have a 90% chance of snagging a $100k job right out of school. It's possible I could even earn more and a 3.5 gpa would give me a ridiculously good chance of landing a job. Law is not for me as I hate working on weekends and evenings an even some holidays. The daily stress of dealing with clients and constant deadlines is terrible and causes me to have headaches, stomach pains and sleepless nights. For 36k I should have been a school teacher. I got some really bad career advice coming out of the military and finishing my UG and going to LS.

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Chunka (Jan 17, 2012 - 7:37 pm)

I'm becoming a law librarian. It only took me one year of law school to realize that I would be horrific in a small law setting (couldn't hustle clients to save my life) and the stress would make me OCD pretty quick. I also got killed during OCI, couldn't impress the big law partners.

If you could do it cheap (im getting a joint degree, law school is free), might be worthwhile. On track to get mid level salary, 8-4 job, defined benefits pension.

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Donatus (Jan 19, 2012 - 3:48 pm)

I bailed after 16 years as a solo. I basically snapped -- i was done. I'm thrilled now. In fact I'm happily on the inactive list....the mfers in the practice can't touch me other than trying to make me take the CLE classes which I refuse to do. Investment adviser now (please don't confuse that w/ financial planning bs, ha ha). Anyway mississippi and smalllawguy understand the realities of living in the jungle.

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worseoffthanaplumber (Jan 19, 2012 - 3:51 pm)

How did you get out? And specifically, how do you do investment consulting now?

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Donatus (Jan 21, 2012 - 3:51 pm)

getting out was easy....one day I just locked the door to the office. I still came in but the doors stayed locked for months. Over time I started cutting the venders lose one by one. You know the parasites who show up to clean the office, wash the carpet, clean the copier, office supplies, the accountant, the guy that does some sh*t with the postage meter from PBowes. I sat in front of the computer numb for a good six months ---- I was always tired...run down....greatly fatigued. This is in 2005. Is this a nervous breakdown?

I had to cut ties with a of people in the industry. Nice guys but very one dimensional. Very old school thinkers -- the types who know nothing about anything other than going to the calendar call on monday morning. its their whole life. You know these guys -- the court house is littered w/ them. The ask you questions like.....1) you busy?, 2) you making $? They also dream of hitting the lottery rather than doing something about their unsatisfying existence. They still would call out to me like it was business as usual. Some would even refer cases to me. They had to go!!!! Phone was disconnected.

Investment consulting -- I've been investing my entire adult life. I set up a firm and handle mostly my own $ and family. Its hard for me to bring on clients cause I'm not sure I can deal w/ them yet. But I'm getting closer. I have a bunch of people that want to open accounts and I tell em that I'll be in touch some day.

There is opportunity for people w/ law degrees in investment advising or financial planning. There is a lot of overlap especially with estate planning and that kind of stuff. You need to take the series 65 which you should be able to pass. Lots of info online about this. I think a lot of financial planning firms would welcome JDs.

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snowday75 (Jul 3, 2018 - 7:50 pm)

Such a great thread. Wonder what ML is up to now.

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esquirewalletsmatter (Jul 5, 2018 - 6:25 am)

Protesting to get 15 dollar an hour minimum wage.

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lawst (Jul 4, 2018 - 1:21 pm)

Get an SSA decision writer job. Least lawyer-like job that requires (mostly) a law license I've ever hard. The quotas suck and it's the most routine work I've ever done, but the compensation/benefits are pretty solid. And the stress isn't too bad if you maintain required production levels.

edit: woops. didn't realize this old thread had been resurrected.

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