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Dallas - entry-level attorney/bail bondsman needed to work graveyard shift

Wow. Seeking Newly Licensed Attorney to Provide Support Du texlaw12/07/13
I always see this same posting on Craigslist. Seems like th txattorney12/07/13
What? The individual who goes in to bond someone out is pers allordpwnsu12/07/13
Yeah, it's a surety bond that the attorney signs. It's mai txattorney12/07/13
Wowsers. So this person would in one week likely run up obli allordpwnsu12/07/13
Yeah, they do that. They don't want any of the client's mon jeffm12/07/13
I didn't even realize how deeply this gig sucked. I'm circli texlaw12/08/13
Tex, just do custody and demand at least 2K up front. And mo kansas12/08/13
+1 if you can stomach it. It can be decently-lucrative. jeffm12/09/13
In Austin you can post personal bonds for inmates 24 hours a yoyomama12/09/13
http://www.dallasnews.com/news/comm unity-news/dallas/headlin onehell12/09/13
Well, please take a few moments to look around, and contact katherinemessick11/11/17
Eh, 4 pm to 12 pm doesn't sound that bad. I used to work 8 p therewillbeblood11/11/17
I’m guessing it’s actually 4pm - 12am or 4am - 12pm. lawrunner31711/12/17
Still beats docreview. Not really but fun to say. Wait, I ca esquire13811/13/17
If you have to sit in a downtown office overnight with your fettywap11/13/17
texlaw (Dec 7, 2013 - 7:16 pm)

Wow.
Seeking Newly Licensed Attorney to Provide Support During Night Shift (Downtown Dallas)
Immediate opportunity for new attorney to gain experience in the criminal defense field by posting bonds for the firm during nighttime hours (4:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m.), Sunday through Thursday, and a 24 hour shift every third weekend. No experience necessary. This is an entry-level position with the opportunity to develop into more.

This is a full-time position. The pay for this position is a beginning base salary of $36,000 per year with the potential for quarterly bonuses in the range of $0 to $2,000.

Work with our rapidly growing law firm located in Downtown Dallas. We seek a hard-working, dedicated individual to serve as a key member of our team. The sole job initially is to post bonds for the firm's clients at various jails/courts throughout the Metroplex, no court appearances required.

Candidate must be able to work at nights from our office and navigate quickly between the various jails/courts throughout the Metroplex. We offer a very friendly working environment, the opportunity to gain experience, and to grow with our expanding law firm. Car and gas will be provided by the firm.

Smokers need not apply.

Please send your resume in confidence via e-mail by replying to the link above. NOTE: In order for your submission to be considered, the subject line of the email must state "Insomniac Attorney for Night Shift Bond Position" and your Texas license date.

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txattorney (Dec 7, 2013 - 7:40 pm)

I always see this same posting on Craigslist. Seems like they find someone to do it for a few weeks or months and then have to re-post when the person they hired either quits or dies from lack of sleep. The unfortunate thing is that the person they hire to post bonds will have tons of outstanding obligations on those bonds if the court dates are not eventually attended by the client or an attorney.

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allordpwnsu (Dec 7, 2013 - 7:43 pm)

What? The individual who goes in to bond someone out is personally liable? You'd have to be an absolute idiot to do that for $36k per year.

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txattorney (Dec 7, 2013 - 7:50 pm)

Yeah, it's a surety bond that the attorney signs. It's mainly done for traffic tickets. Texas is a state that actually allows an attorney to be their own client's bondsman.

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allordpwnsu (Dec 7, 2013 - 8:34 pm)

Wowsers. So this person would in one week likely run up obligations substantially in excess of their annual income all for $36k a year? Gotta hand it to the company running this. What a great way to take advantage of the lawyer glut. Find some desperate schlub. Pay $36k. Have them incur $1 million of personal liability while the person bonded out pays you $100k. Rinse. Repeat.

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jeffm (Dec 7, 2013 - 8:43 pm)

Yeah, they do that. They don't want any of the client's money to have to be dedicated to a bond. The less the client has to pay third-parties; the more for you to represent them.

Up until a few years ago, there was a somewhat prevalent practice of attorneys putting in the bond contract / atty-client agreement that if client failed to appear, attorney would plead guilty for client (to get the warrant out and get the guy).

The state bar opined it was an impermissible conflict of interest, and so I do not think that the auto-plead feature exists anymore.

But still, they might do the personal bonding to get more for atty fees.

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texlaw (Dec 8, 2013 - 9:15 pm)

I didn't even realize how deeply this gig sucked. I'm circling back around to other chronically open lawjobs in Dallas after being gone a year and a half. I'm seriously giving up on there being anything decent/reasonable out there.

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kansas (Dec 8, 2013 - 10:06 pm)

Tex, just do custody and demand at least 2K up front. And monthly refreshers or pull out. Or 5K, hell, it won't cost less. Nobody wants custody, you know how. Call up everybody you know and tell them you'll do it. It'll suck, but you'll get referrals.

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jeffm (Dec 9, 2013 - 2:27 am)

+1 if you can stomach it. It can be decently-lucrative.

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yoyomama (Dec 9, 2013 - 10:59 am)

In Austin you can post personal bonds for inmates 24 hours a day, similar to a bondsman. We call it jail release. The guy posting the bond isn't responsible for any of the money. You're doing this job for the criminal lawyer who got hired at 2am, but doesn't want to go down to the jail/magistrate to bail the guy out.

I did this type of work when I first got licensed and made a good amount of money working for several lawyers. Their name is on the bond, not yours. If their clients don't show up, all the judge does it raise the bond, issues warrant, and you're off the case. It's not a bad deal, depending on how much you make on each release.

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onehell (Dec 9, 2013 - 11:02 am)

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/community-news/dallas/headlines/20110709-bail-bonding-is-a-lucrative-largely-unregulated-practice-for-some-dallas-county-attorneys.ece

So apparently, lawyers in TX can use their bar cards to almost completely bypass the collateralization and reinsurance that regular bond companies have to have, but it has to be on the individual's license and can't be registered, for example, to a whole firm. So yeah, these guys just want to hire some desperate law grad who will put his license on the line so they don't have to. Who knows, they may even be among the people with shut down accounts. Apparently defaulting on millions in bonds for some reason doesn't cause you to lose your law license, but defaulting on 100k in student loans does?

Some people might blame the state and see this similarly to making a no-doc loan. But I blame the lawyers. I mean, here is TX which has continued to put some level of trust in lawyers in an era where almost no one does. Once upon a time, a bar card meant a good name, professionalism and ethics. Now, we only pay lip service to those things and concentrate entirely on keeping out 25 year olds with an unpaid parking ticket before they've had the opportunity to make a dime. The result is that our bar card conveys absolutely NOTHING save the right to appear in court and get yelled at, while an army of other pseudo professionals in HR and compliance and real estate and document preparation and tax prep not only eat our lunch but increasingly get laws passed which allow them to practice more law than we can. And despite things like the same real estate broker firm representing both buyer and seller and otherwise having really no ethics code whatsoever, they are always seen as more ethical than attorneys. And crap like this is why. Give us lawyers an inch, and we take a mile.

But back to TX. Again, a shining example of somewhere that still says "hey, a bar card means an officer of the court is vouching for them!" But give us even a little bit of honor or dignity and respect? Ha! Sure enough, that trust was misplaced. In most states we can't even function as notaries or real estate agents for crying out loud. And why? Because no one trusts us or sees our education as worth anything at all except for making us into slimy, greedy assholes. And sometimes, I can't blame 'em.

This stinking profession and its greed (and in this case and many others, cannibalism) is really disgusting. The decision not to require all kinds of evidence of adequate capitalization and reinsurance and whatnot was intended to be a courtesy to recognize the ability of respected professionals not to abuse the privileges they've been granted.

If a regular bondsmen bails you out, he's going to collect the premium up-front and not only get a cosign from your mom and whatever other relatives he can find, but probably get mom's consent to put a lien on her car title as well. And if you skip, you can bet that Dog the Bounty Hunter will be using that same leverage to turn every friend or family member you've ever had against you and you will be found.

But here, it might as well be personal recognizance since everyone knows the lawyer is not good for the bond and probably won't actively pursue the fugitive in the event of a skip. That would be OK if lawyers could still be trusted to bail out only reliable clients they knew. But no. Once again, grant us a privilege and we are sure to abuse it. Keep the retainer, stiff the court on the bond, and move on to the next. Ugh.

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katherinemessick (Nov 11, 2017 - 10:20 pm)

Well, please take a few moments to look around, and contact us with any questions, or inquiries. We are an expert team of Bondsmen from http://www.ezfreebailbonds.com/ that are available 24/7 to assist you, and your family, with any needs pertaining to bonds and can work anytime of the day/night. Cheers!

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therewillbeblood (Nov 11, 2017 - 10:28 pm)

Eh, 4 pm to 12 pm doesn't sound that bad. I used to work 8 pm to 8 am and that sucked.

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lawrunner317 (Nov 12, 2017 - 8:48 am)

I’m guessing it’s actually 4pm - 12am or 4am - 12pm.

Otherwise 16 hr days for $36k plus a random 24 hour shift is ludicrous!

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esquire138 (Nov 13, 2017 - 7:55 pm)

Still beats docreview. Not really but fun to say. Wait, I can't smoke? Fashists!!!

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fettywap (Nov 13, 2017 - 8:29 pm)

If you have to sit in a downtown office overnight with your door unlocked, while criminals contact you for bond, I would be terrified. That can't be safe.

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