Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Became A Police Officer

I went to a TTTT in the south. I managed to graduate in the LearnedHand8201/08/10
Good move. I know its not much but you can take advantage johndoeee01/08/10
there's nothing to stop him/her from being an attorney later TiredofStrugglin01/08/10
How hard was it to land the police officer gig? I would do sarbinson01/08/10
I applied in late September and received a final offer about LearnedHand8201/08/10
In the mid west it is probably pretty easy-in California you ElvisEsq.01/08/10
I actually was a city cop in the deep south for a while. I'm FormerInfamousPoster01/08/10
Note that my starting pay is slightly less than 50K (but if LearnedHand8201/08/10
So at the end, do you think that 20% pay bump made law schoo coderemeritus01/08/10
Why don't you answer his question? amls01/08/10
If I had the choice to go to law school to work at this dept LearnedHand8201/08/10
He asked you where you worked, a question you could answer i amls01/10/10
Well, I'd like to know which metro area you are working in ( FormerInfamousPoster01/10/10
Thanks for the advice. However, you know nothing about me o LearnedHand8201/10/10
You keep dodging his question. amls01/10/10
I could care less if you think I am lying. I am not reveali LearnedHand8201/10/10
I'm just curious: You said deep south so I'm thinking Georgi johndoeee01/10/10
Well, a dove isn't a twenty. You're probably thinking of dub FormerInfamousPoster01/10/10
What state are you in and what metro area? FormerInfamousPoster01/08/10
I've always been a proponent of careers like police officer coderemeritus01/10/10
http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/loca l/Port-Authority-Police-O aknas12/11/11
I'll echo a couple others who wonder why some of you are que YouGottaBeShittingMe12/11/11
Wow, just wow on the $272 per month ibr payment. So you know subprimeJD12/11/11
I tell the lemmings: "don't be a fool drop out of school." H worseoffthanaplumber12/11/11
Why bother taking the risks that come with being a police of joey12/11/11
http://www.silive.com/news/index.ss f/2014/11/port_authority_ supercalifragilisti04/08/18
Most of the people here are white males, and thus, with no c diarrheaboy12/11/11
Why not try for the NYPD? It just takes a long time! You ha NYCOP12/12/11
I took the test a couple of years ago, passed, and got calle therewillbeblood12/12/11
"For example, the NYPD has a three year wait list." Perfe CattleProd12/12/11
Someone as a cop with a JD has the potential to rise to the CattleProd12/12/11
Congrats on getting hired. There was an article in our pape aintnoreason12/12/11
Police officers in Northern Virginia start @ $53k. aknas03/12/18
"For that, I cannot blame myself." I wonder if OP is stil isthisit03/12/18
I was a prosecutor years back, worked closely with an LEO dr porochi03/13/18
Could it be that you observed a very small sample size? When dakotalaw03/13/18
Maybe you are the one observing a very small sample size, ye porochi03/13/18
Mc Mineman travelled to New York for an annual reunion of hi aknas03/14/18

LearnedHand82 (Jan 8, 2010 - 12:43 am)

I went to a TTTT in the south. I managed to graduate in the top of my class and even earned a spot on Law Review. However, I had no luck finding an attorney job.

Thus, I decided to become a police officer. Luckily, the department where I will be working pays extra for a law degree. I will start out with awesome benefits and a starting salary slightly short of 50K (in the deep south). Plus, thanks to IBR and the new forgiveness program, I will have over 100K of federal debt wiped out completely. My monthly payment on IBR will be $272.11 (for 108,500 of debt).

I did work at a law firm before I went to law school. I also evaluated employment statistics and sought advice from attorneys about the pros and cons of law school. I, too, was misled with inflated employment statistics from my school and the legal profession in general. For that, I cannot blame myself. A part of me is upset that I wasted over 100K and three years of opportunity costs, but another part is happy that I will not spend any time in doc review or shitlaw only to return to JDU years later with nothing but more debt, less hope, and more despair.

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johndoeee (Jan 8, 2010 - 12:48 am)

Good move.

I know its not much but you can take advantage, quickly, after just a few years.

Night Diff
Details
Allowances
OT

Your salary will go up quickly.

You can go to work in Security later on. You'll have a lot of options, if you want.

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TiredofStrugglin (Jan 8, 2010 - 9:48 am)

there's nothing to stop him/her from being an attorney later on, too!

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sarbinson (Jan 8, 2010 - 11:16 am)

How hard was it to land the police officer gig? I would do it in a second as well.

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LearnedHand82 (Jan 8, 2010 - 2:07 pm)

I applied in late September and received a final offer about three weeks ago.

Where you apply matters too. If you are in the north or the Rust Belt, you could wait years. For example, the NYPD has a three year wait list.

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ElvisEsq. (Jan 8, 2010 - 11:51 pm)

In the mid west it is probably pretty easy-in California you won't get hired unless you're one of the connected few;

1- Family,

2- Friends,

3- Military workfare and

4- Civil rights lawsuit consent decree hires for engaging in 1 & 2 above.

I mean, where else can you make $161K per year in cash and another $161K in benefits, plus OT with just a GED?????


http://www.ci.richmond.ca.us/DocumentView.aspx?DID=4869

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FormerInfamousPoster (Jan 8, 2010 - 11:52 am)

I actually was a city cop in the deep south for a while. I'm unaware of any forces down here that hire rookies at 50K/yr. There are some smaller cities around Atlanta like Sandy Springs that start out around 50, but they do not hire rookies because they're flooded with burnouts from surrounding counties. Where are you working?

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LearnedHand82 (Jan 8, 2010 - 2:10 pm)

Note that my starting pay is slightly less than 50K (but if you include all the benefits and opps to work overtime it could easily be over 50K).

Many places in the south start at or around 30K-35K. The place where I applied gives out generous education incentives for degrees. However, unlike many other depts, this dept pays even more for a JD/PhD and a master's. I will start out at or around 20% more per year than a person with a BA or BS simply for having a JD.

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coderemeritus (Jan 8, 2010 - 2:22 pm)

So at the end, do you think that 20% pay bump made law school worth it money-wise. I know you said you think you lost about 100k for wasting those 3 years. But starting 20% higher seems pretty nice. And that cascades down for the years to come. I actually think you'll make up your investment come 10 years down the line, or sooner.

The IBR loan forgiveness is also pretty damn nice.

Good luck to you. I've always thought police officer was a great career to have. Hope you don't find yourself in too much stress and/or danger.

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amls (Jan 8, 2010 - 2:23 pm)

Why don't you answer his question?

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LearnedHand82 (Jan 8, 2010 - 2:29 pm)

If I had the choice to go to law school to work at this dept for the extra 20% versus working at this dept with just a BA/BS, I would choose the latter. I would rather have no educational debts rather than some extra money to start. Plus, in the three years that I could have already been working as a PO I could have received several COLA raises.

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amls (Jan 10, 2010 - 1:40 am)

He asked you where you worked, a question you could answer if you weren't lying.

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FormerInfamousPoster (Jan 10, 2010 - 1:50 pm)

Well, I'd like to know which metro area you are working in (or at the very least, the state). The department I started with was one of the better paying in my state and it wasn't anywhere near 50k.

In any event, I have experience as a city cop if you know my posting history (dropped out after first semester and took a job as a cop). It's a totally different life; it's an alternate reality. Unless you've been exposed to the rougher elements of life, you're illequiped right now. The academy will give you the basics, but there's a steep learning curve. The only reason I was able to pull it off was because, unfortunately, I spent most of my childhood in a low income area- college was my way out. Your education isn't going to confer any advantage to you on the street. I highly suggest that you familiarize yourself with street slang if you're going to be working in minority dominated low income areas. Do you know what a dove is? If not, read up. If you don't have any background with firearms, I suggest you start now. It is a lifestyle, not a career. It changes the way you think and act. You have to be dedicated to the job or you're going to get yourself or other people hurt. Evaluate how serious you are about the job before proceeding.

If you're serious about this, I can give you some advice on starting out. Leave an email address here where I can contact you if you're interested.

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LearnedHand82 (Jan 10, 2010 - 4:57 pm)

Thanks for the advice. However, you know nothing about me or my background. Before you preach to me about what I should be like, why don't you stop assuming I am some rich yuppie from the 'burbs who has no knowledge of street slang.

Firearms? I grew up in the deep South where you learn how to shoot a gun before you can read. So, yes, I know how to use a gun.

And, BTW, a "dove" is a twenty ("twenny") sack. And no, I did not need to look that up on the Internet.

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amls (Jan 10, 2010 - 5:00 pm)

You keep dodging his question.

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LearnedHand82 (Jan 10, 2010 - 5:07 pm)

I could care less if you think I am lying. I am not revealing where I am working b/c I value being anon.

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johndoeee (Jan 10, 2010 - 5:54 pm)

I'm just curious: You said deep south so I'm thinking Georgia or Alabama, leaning towards Alabama for some odd reason.. Louisiana - maybe.. But I'm not feeling it.

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FormerInfamousPoster (Jan 10, 2010 - 5:53 pm)

Well, a dove isn't a twenty. You're probably thinking of dub. But I digress.

I wasn't intending to offend you. That's the standard advice I give anyone going into law enforcement. I wish you luck. I was asking which metro area you're in out of curiosity, not because I think you are lying. I'm genuinely unaware of any forces down here that pay that much starting out. I'd like to know.

Good luck with the academy. It will be a lot of fun. Stay safe.

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FormerInfamousPoster (Jan 8, 2010 - 2:55 pm)

What state are you in and what metro area?

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coderemeritus (Jan 10, 2010 - 5:56 pm)

I've always been a proponent of careers like police officer or firefighter. Not entirely sure why there are some people here who think LearnedHand82's story is implausible. The only thing that I wonder about is the 20% increase in starting pay. But if that is true, which I'm going to give the benefit of the doubt on, we're talking a normal starting pay of around 40k. (20% of 40 is 8, and 48k is "slightly" under 50k)

The OP said he was in the "deep south." While I'm not sure what that means exactly, I'll randomly say that is Texas. Hook 'em horns!!

Here is a link to the starting salary of a Texas State Trooper:

http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/trainingacademy/Trooper_Trainee/HR-22.pdf

It shows that a probationary trooper gets paid $3,285 a month and a "Trooper I" gets paid $3,935 a month

Based on those numbers, if given a 20% bump, a starting state trooper earns around 50k.

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aknas (Dec 11, 2011 - 10:42 am)

http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Port-Authority-Police-Overtime-Budget-Highest-Paid-Officers-135337238.html

Port Authority Beat Cop Earns $221,000
Dozens of PAPD officers earn more than $200,000 in 2011, thanks to overtime.
By Chris Hawley| Friday, Dec 9, 2011 | Updated 6:00 PM EST

Getty Images

A rank-and-file policeman at the George Washington Bridge has made more than $200,000 so far this year, along with dozens of other police officers for the agency that patrols New York City's airports, the tunnels under the Hudson River and the new World Trade Center site.

Payroll figures and names released for the first time Friday by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey show 66 police officers have made more than $200,000 so far in 2011, thanks to overtime that in many cases has doubled their salaries.

The bridge patrolman made $221,706. A sergeant on a special-operations team pulled in $265,059. That puts him above executives like Aviation Director Susan Baer, who oversees three of the world's busiest airports — JFK, LaGuardia and Newark — and two other airports. She's made $237,971 so far this year.

The Port Authority Police Benevolent Association, the union that represents most of the police, says the high overtime numbers are the agency's own fault. President Paul Nunziato said the union has been asking the Port Authority for years to hire more officers.

"To me, it's absurd, and I've told them it's absurd," Nunziato said. "It's cheaper to hire another guy and pay his benefits than paying someone 2,000 hours or 2,500 hours at time-and-a-half."

The Port Authority did not immediately comment on the numbers, but earlier this week Executive Director Patrick Foye said he hoped their release would expose waste.

"What you can measure you can manage," said Foye, who receives a $289,667 yearly salary.

The Port Authority operates New York City's airports, its seaports, a train system, and several bridges and tunnels. It also owns the site of the new World Trade Center.

Its finances came under scrutiny in August when the board approved steep toll increases that outraged many commuters. The agency said it needed to boost its credit-worthiness partly to finish the World Trade Center. But the governors of New York and New Jersey ordered an outside audit.

The Port Authority receives no tax money and funds itself through tolls, rents, surcharges on airline tickets and other fees.

The special-ops sergeant who made $265,059 is the highest paid policeman so far this year. His pay includes $115,394 in overtime. Besides the aviation director's pay, it also outstrips Chief Financial Officer Michael Fabiano's earnings of $257,814.

Another patrol sergeant assigned to the Port Authority Trans Hudson Train system has made $256,000 this year, thanks in part to $133,565 in overtime.

The windfall also extends to rank-and-file police officers, most of whom earn base salaries between $68,000 and $90,000 a year.

The patrolman on the George Washington Bridge boosted his $90,000 salary to $221,000 this year through overtime, differential pay and other compensation, the figures show. Another patrolman has earned $218,950.

Overall, the Public Safety Department and its 1,696 employees accounted for $41.4 million of the $90.4 million the Port Authority has paid out in overtime this year. The Port Authority has 6,777 employees.

The figures released Friday also showed how overtime boosted the salaries of other employees. For example, 24 plumbers earn between $49,000 and $78,000 in base pay, but they collected an average $14,500 on top of that this year. Many toll collectors boosted their base wages of $58,916 to $85,000 or more this year with overtime.

Officers with the New York Police Department have long complained they are poorly paid compared to the Port Authority police and suburban police forces. The NYPD has about 35,000 officers.

"At our current rate of pay, New York City Police officers are still among the lowest paid big city police officers in the nation," said Patrick Lynch, head of the New York City Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, the city's largest police union.

Copyright Associated Press / NBC New York

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YouGottaBeShittingMe (Dec 11, 2011 - 11:19 am)

I'll echo a couple others who wonder why some of you are questioning the salary.

My local department starts rookies with a BA at $44k after the academy and FTO time, not counting overtime or court time. My friends who have been in for 1-2 years are bringing home easy $55-60k when its all included, not to mention the benefits. And that's without a bonus for a JD, which doesn't exist here but I guess could elsewhere.

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subprimeJD (Dec 11, 2011 - 11:33 am)

Wow, just wow on the $272 per month ibr payment. So you know I fucking forked out $7500 in the last 2 months on loan payments even though I owe about half of what you owe 50k range. It will take you 27 months of payments to pay what I just paid. I find it disgusting that those in "public" service get debt forgiveness in 10 yrs while those in the private sector have to pay it all back. Of course you run the risk of getting laid off and then you will be stuck with a much bigger balance as the payment doesn't cover the full interest.

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worseoffthanaplumber (Dec 11, 2011 - 2:46 pm)

I tell the lemmings: "don't be a fool drop out of school." However, they don't believe me...

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joey (Dec 11, 2011 - 3:51 pm)

Why bother taking the risks that come with being a police officer when you can make six figures as a toll collector?

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/high_pay_pa_crew_taking_their_toll_fow7ejUj111RDLHeZkGhbI

PA workers raking in big bucks
By MICHAEL GARTLAND

Last Updated: 12:50 PM, December 11, 2011

Posted: 12:01 AM, December 11, 2011

They take your cash . . . in so many ways.

Port Authority toll collectors not only grab your money at New York-New Jersey crossings, they’re now pulling down stunning six-figure salaries funded by the levies you pay at bridges and tunnels.

Twenty-four toll collectors at the bi-state agency have made more than $80,000 so far in 2011 — payments pumped up by massive overtime. Seven of those workers took in $90,000 or more.

But that’s chump change to the top toll taker.

Warren Stevens has made $102,670 so far this year — $40,614 of it OT.

With overtime paid at time-and-a-half, Stevens averaged about 20 hours of OT per week, or about 130 extra eight-hour shifts per year, an analysis of PA data shows.

Karen DuPree is the No. 2 highest-paid toll taker, making $97,621 — more than a third of it from overtime pay of $37,470.

The annual salaries will only swell since the figures released Friday for all 6,777 PA employees do not include December paychecks.

Princesella Smith, 51, who has made $89,599 working the toll lanes at the George Washington Bridge this year, understandably loves her profession.

“I’m blessed,” she told The Post. “I have a great job, and in this economy it’s great that I can cover everything with my eight hours a day and overs.”

The driving public is a little less enthused, especially after the PA hiked tolls $4 this past summer at its six crossings.

“Any commuter is going to be outraged,” said Cathleen Lewis, a spokeswoman for AAA New Jersey. “Any toll increase should be paying for infrastructure . . . It shouldn’t be paying for excessive salaries.”

Toll collectors — whose ranks have dwindled to 147 as they are replaced by the electronic E-ZPass system — aren’t the only ones cashing in.

Port Authority gardeners are raking in big bucks, too. At least 11 of them bring in annual salaries of more than $80,000.

Michael Finlator has earned $94,106 in 2011 as a gardener. More than $24,000 of that comes from overtime.

Fernando Ippolito, a blacksmith, took in more than $146,000.

Louis LaCapra, the PA’s chief administrative officer, made the most of any agency employee, bringing in $324,940 so far.

Kevin Cottrell, the agency’s top paid cop, made $265,059 in 2011.

The PA — being sued by motorist groups who claim chronically increasing tolls don’t go to pay for transportation projects — is now conducting an audit of its finances.

“The Port Authority is conducting an agency-wide review led by a special committee of its board,” spokesman Ron Marsico said. “That review will address compensation and benefits.”

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who shares oversight of the PA with Gov. Cuomo, believes more scrutiny must be paid to the agency’s finances and skyrocketing salaries.

“There has to be some rational basis for individuals making their salaries or more than their salaries in overtime,” said Christie spokesman Michael Drewniak.

“Management practices need scrutiny at the Port Authority.”

Cuomo’s office did not respond yesterday to a request for comment.

The PA’s 1,300 cops are also getting huge overtime payments, but Robert Egbert, the board of trustees chairman for the union that represents them, said a shortage of cops is to blame. He said the agency hasn’t hired new cops since 2008.

“That’s mismanagement by the Port Authority,” he said. “Their response is it’s cheaper to pay the overtime than to hire the new employees.”

[email protected]

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supercalifragilisti (Apr 8, 2018 - 3:39 pm)

http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2014/11/port_authority_toll_collector.html

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diarrheaboy (Dec 11, 2011 - 4:37 pm)

Most of the people here are white males, and thus, with no cop father, cop school is a pipe dream for most on this form. Sure you can apply to cop school, and it will get filed with the 6,000 other applicants, never to see the light of day again.

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NYCOP (Dec 12, 2011 - 7:35 am)

Why not try for the NYPD? It just takes a long time! You have to take the test, get on the list, and wait 2-4 years to get called. With NYPD anyway, if you pass, they will take you, eventually.

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therewillbeblood (Dec 12, 2011 - 6:36 pm)

I took the test a couple of years ago, passed, and got called a few months ago. Spent hours filling out the application until I got to the part where you have to list the name, address, phone number, date of birth, and place of birth for EVERY SINGLE BLOOD RELATIVE. Under the NYPD's definition of blood relative I would have to list people I have never even met. Decided at that point the NYPD could go to hell and dropped the idea.

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CattleProd (Dec 12, 2011 - 11:22 am)

"For example, the NYPD has a three year wait list."

Perfect !!! All 0L law students should apply before their first semester.

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CattleProd (Dec 12, 2011 - 11:57 am)

Someone as a cop with a JD has the potential to rise to the upper ranks of the department. It seems like all of the top sheriffs or administrators have graduate degrees. Typically the basic cop 2 year degree will not rise to the top of the ranks. This is just my amateur observation. I have nothing to back this up.

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aintnoreason (Dec 12, 2011 - 5:56 pm)

Congrats on getting hired. There was an article in our paper lately that one of our agencies would hire 35 out of an application list of 3000. Years ago they gave enough veteran preference that most hired were over the 100 points that a perfect score non veteran would get. Eye requirements of 20/40 uncorrected would have knocked out a lot of the more studious types, and they have since added polygraphs to weed out applicants. WOuldn't surprise me if it wasn't harder now to get hired by a pd than to get accepted to law school. There was also an explanation that they had moved the retirement age for police from that agency from 52 to 65 for full benefits, which would have the effect of those jobs being available less often, and the retirement package being lessened due to the longer work requirement.

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aknas (Mar 12, 2018 - 6:32 pm)

Police officers in Northern Virginia start @ $53k.

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isthisit (Mar 12, 2018 - 6:52 pm)

"For that, I cannot blame myself."

I wonder if OP is still putting nightsticks up the @ss of minorities down south 🤔.

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porochi (Mar 13, 2018 - 12:10 am)

I was a prosecutor years back, worked closely with an LEO drug task force. Used to accompany them when they'd execute search warrants. All I can say is I'm glad body cameras and cell phone cameras weren't ubiquitous back then. God, the stuff I saw. That experience forever tainted my opinion of cops. Sorry, but the lot of them seem to be racist sadists. If that's the kind of folks you'd like to work with, being a cop is for you.

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dakotalaw (Mar 13, 2018 - 11:20 am)

Could it be that you observed a very small sample size? When I was a prosecutor I did the same thing. Most of the cops were Hispanic or white. Nice guys.

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porochi (Mar 13, 2018 - 11:32 pm)

Maybe you are the one observing a very small sample size, yes? Judging from your moniker, I assume you practice in one of the lily white Dakota's, save for the Indian (sorry, Native American) reservations scattered there. Where I practiced, very diverse, but not the LEO community, be it Sheriff, local PD, state law enforcement, etc. All on the multi-county drug task force I worked with. True, our experience was anecdotal but damn, the stuff I saw and heard from those guys, and gals, from a variety of LEO organizations, the KKK doesn't have much on them. Glad I got out of prosecution. But also very glad to see the advent of body cameras and cell phone cameras, that does help keep them honest. I am convinced that the personality trait that is drawn to being a cop is somewhat sadistic in nature.

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aknas (Mar 14, 2018 - 9:43 am)

Mc Mineman travelled to New York for an annual reunion of his old police colleagues, who admired him greatly.

They were all former members of a special drugs unit in the 1970s, who were given complete responsibility to crack down on drug crime. They believed they were above the law and could do anything to get convictions – Daly was a member of that.



Whenever there was a drugs seizure, the unit would pocket any cash that was there between them – this was at a time when police wages were slashed, and they felt they were struggling to get by.

“That was the culture of the time,” Mc Menamin says. “Ex-NYPD officers that I’ve spoken to all say the same thing: you didn’t get ahead in the police [if you didn't go along with it]. You’d be on the police, totally ostracised by the police.

It started off that you’d get a cup of coffee, then a hair cut, and it escalated from there.
According to reports, when Daly was caught his salary was 30 times what it should have been.

The 100 Kilo Case

This all stopped when Detective Frank Serpico – portrayed by Al Pacino in the film Serpico – and Bob Lucey reported what was going on to the authorities.

http://www.thejournal.ie/peter-daly-3215660-Feb2017/


Frank Serpico
[to a criminal in custody] I want to talk to you. I want to take you across the street, get you a cup of coffee . . . without cuffs. Now look, I didn't touch you upstairs, right? You take off on me, I'll put one in your back. Understand? Come on.

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