Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Getting an article published...

Hi folks! 2017 JD grad here. Has anyone here attempted to ge dharamsala01/28/18
I’ve been published twice. It’s not hard. And it won’t notiers01/29/18
"What are your career goals and what are you trying to accom dharamsala01/29/18
It's not hard at all, even without a P.R. team. You can look thirdtierlaw01/29/18
One thing that always bothers me is when people publish arti t3success01/29/18
Constantly updating your website can help improve your googl thirdtierlaw01/29/18
Can getting published help with obtaining an adjunct positio dharamsala01/29/18
not with your scholastic record dingbat01/29/19
I disagree with most of this thread. I published articles a nighthawk01/29/18
This is so well said. yankeebirdie01/28/19
What would be better-publishing in a local bar association j dharamsala01/29/18
I find there are many advantages to writing law review and j blawprof01/29/19
For law reviews, the standard practice is to write the artic therewillbeblood01/29/19
My first reaction was skepticism, and then I had to think ba roccog01/29/19
It can't hurt. isthisit01/29/19
The "advantage" would be that you have one more qualificatio catwoman33301/29/19
dharamsala (Jan 28, 2018 - 11:53 pm)

Hi folks! 2017 JD grad here. Has anyone here attempted to get an article published after graduating from law school? I have a secondary journal in mind. Is this something that would help me career-wise or distinguish me in the long-run to have on my resume? I missed out on the Law Review boat in law school.

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notiers (Jan 29, 2018 - 12:42 am)

I’ve been published twice. It’s not hard. And it won’t help your career at all. As far as how to do it. I believe I called the marketing director at my firm who in turn called our PR people and got my mediocre articles published.

To do it on your own would be difficult and largely a waste of your time.

What are your career goals and what are you trying to accomplish- I’m certain there are better things you can do to work toward them then waste your time with an article.

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dharamsala (Jan 29, 2018 - 9:11 am)

"What are your career goals and what are you trying to accomplish- I’m certain there are better things you can do to work toward them then waste your time with an article."

My interests are pretty wide-ranging-immigration, family law, criminal defense, disability law, etc. Interested in small firm as well as public interest (i.e. PD, legal aid). I'm interested in getting published for its own sake as well as possibly enhancing my career down the line.

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thirdtierlaw (Jan 29, 2018 - 8:33 am)

It's not hard at all, even without a P.R. team. You can look at a few places to get published. You can look at trade journals, law reviews, or your bar magazine/journal. You call up the editor and ask where you can submit an article, then you follow their instructions.

There are 100s of bar journals out that. Every law school has one and a lot of them have more than one law review. If you make enough phone calls, someone will print your article.

Career-wise it is unlikely to do anything for you. It certainly won't help you get a legal job.** The only reason people care about law review is that it is considered difficult to get into. So it supposedly distinguishes you from other people that didn't do law review. Whether they publish your note or not while on doc review is meaningless to employers.

**If you are an already established practice and you write a series of articles about a newly emerging issue in the field, that appear in that same trade journal every month or two, you may be able to get your name out there as the "go-to" person regarding that issue. Some small firms took this route in places that legalized marijuana. That could create a lot of extra business for you. But this isn't relevant to you at this point in your career. You're not even a real lawyer yet. So let's say you get these articles published over the next year and you're an absolute expert on that one topic, no business is going to retain you to handle their legal matters, you don't have enough experience to handle 99% of the other stuff that'll come up. You maybe could leverage a consultant position though.

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t3success (Jan 29, 2018 - 8:39 am)

One thing that always bothers me is when people publish articles in areas they don’t even practice in. That aside, no one reads them. I could barely read an article written by a friend in a local Bar journal about some largely irrelevant topic. Who cares. I also notice that some attorneys at larger firms will simply feel compelled to churn out dumb articles for their website if they are slow on work so they can hope to justify their existence to themselves. Again I don’t think many people really read articles on firm websites, yet firm marketing departments think it’s the best business development strategy ever. You acquire and retain clients through the community church, country club, dinner parties, etc. Not from some dumb article that a second year associate wrote.

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thirdtierlaw (Jan 29, 2018 - 9:52 am)

Constantly updating your website can help improve your google rankings. I think the articles on the website have a bigger payoff for garbage law, opposed to other areas of law. Especially if they draft their "articles" in the right way. If someone gets a DUI, one of the first things they do is go to google and type in, "what happens what you get a dui in my state." If you have an article on your site it may bring them to your page. Or for family court issues they type in, "what happens if a parent moves out of state." If you have a small article on your site, they can come to you. But I don't see any medium to large sized company turning to google to answer any question of importance.

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dharamsala (Jan 29, 2018 - 9:12 am)

Can getting published help with obtaining an adjunct position at a law school?

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dingbat (Jan 29, 2019 - 2:30 pm)

not with your scholastic record

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nighthawk (Jan 29, 2018 - 9:52 am)

I disagree with most of this thread. I published articles and it definitely helped to get a job and for career advancement. Publishing an article helps for 2 reasons: 1) shows intelligence and knowledge about a field and 2) shows that you are trying to improve your resume. It also comes down to what you are trying to do. If you are trying to do real estate closings then demonstrating strong writing and researching skills is not relevant, so publishing would not help your cause. If you want are trying to involve yourself with something that has a strong research and writing aspect then it is very helpful.

With that said, it is strictly a factor. It will not, by itself, get you a job. It can distinguish you, especially from those that do doc review who hold themselves out to be the unsophisticated lawyers.

Also, one article is not sufficient, you need to show that you can do this regularly.

Regarding OP, you need to create a plan that will get you to where you want to go. Throwing stuff out there, regardless of its value, is not going to make things happen.

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yankeebirdie (Jan 28, 2019 - 10:40 pm)

This is so well said.

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dharamsala (Jan 29, 2018 - 11:30 pm)

What would be better-publishing in a local bar association journal or in a law review?

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blawprof (Jan 29, 2019 - 9:32 am)

I find there are many advantages to writing law review and journal articles. I have written several law review and journal articles. When I was working as in-house counsel, I started teaching a class as an adjunct instructor. I wrote one article as an adjunct instructor that helped me land a full-time job as a professor. I also wrote a textbook that has done well based in part on a law review article I wrote. My publisher would never have looked at my book proposal without at least a few published articles. I have earned more money on my first book than my first year out of law school. In some states, you can earn CLE credits for writing articles. Writing a journal article also helps you improve your research and writing skills along with subject matter knowledge of the law. Furthermore, writing a law journal article can lead to consulting work. Another lawyer contacted me about a project where I did some consulting work based on a law review article that I wrote. I say go for it. It can't hurt (other than opportunity cost for time) and can only help. Some sophisticated clients will be impressed by published articles.

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therewillbeblood (Jan 29, 2019 - 3:15 pm)

For law reviews, the standard practice is to write the article, then submit it via either ExpressO or Scholastica. Some top-tier law schools especially have their own systems, but publishing in those is hard unless you're a prof at a top-tier law school or a federal judge.

But ExpressO/Scholastica are pretty straightforward; you can submit to multiple journals at once (paying like 6 bucks per submission), and at some point if you're lucky someone will offer to publish it.

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roccog (Jan 29, 2019 - 5:07 pm)

My first reaction was skepticism, and then I had to think back nearly a decade and recall that an article I published in 2009 played a substantial role in getting me a job in 2010 where I worked on the issue in said article and launched a career in the field more broadly.

So... yeah, fwiw, it can help.

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isthisit (Jan 29, 2019 - 6:53 pm)

It can't hurt.

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catwoman333 (Jan 29, 2019 - 10:31 pm)

The "advantage" would be that you have one more qualification (published articles) than your competitors for jobs. It just might be "the edge" that gets you interviews/offers. Also, if you ever wish to hang out your own shingle as a solo, you could post them on your website to attract clients.

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