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divorce attorney salary

what is the salary of an experienced associate of a matrimon mrlaw08/08/18
Depends on the firm. Anywhere from $60k to $300k dingbat08/08/18
for someone with experience? mrlaw08/11/18
yes. An associate working for a solo is highly unlikely to dingbat08/12/18
What salary? Not all divorces are like Donald vs. Ivann patenttrollnj08/12/18
it's better than immigration law, anything is. mrlaw08/12/18
Here's the thing: NONE of this stuff would be a problem if patenttrollnj08/12/18
Moderate high-worth individuals can make a nice practice. I therewillbeblood08/12/18
100% spot on. We should also warn the OP that having well-h paradactyl08/13/18
mrlaw (Aug 8, 2018 - 9:29 pm)

what is the salary of an experienced associate of a matrimonial firm in nyc area?

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dingbat (Aug 8, 2018 - 10:53 pm)

Depends on the firm. Anywhere from $60k to $300k

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mrlaw (Aug 11, 2018 - 10:41 pm)

for someone with experience?

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dingbat (Aug 12, 2018 - 12:55 am)

yes. An associate working for a solo is highly unlikely to make six figures, even with several years experience, whereas a NY biglaw associate maxes out at around $350-$375k (including bonuses). And seriously, if you're in NY biglaw making $350k as an associate, you're about to be counseled out, because you've reached the point where you should have made partner already.

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patenttrollnj (Aug 12, 2018 - 2:18 pm)

What salary?

Not all divorces are like Donald vs. Ivanna.

Depending on the caliber of clients you have, you may be spending your time haggling over getting your bill paid rather than actual legal work.

Also, if it's an uncontested divorce for a middle or below middle class couple, we're talking no more than $5,000 per case. Sure, you can bill for phone conversations and such, but these people don't have the money to pay you back, or they'll outright refuse to pay you. Expect to be in arbitration over legal fees often. Thus, you really need to become a "divorce mill" in order to sustain a practice.

The most common complaint I've heard from people that have used a divorce lawyer: "he didn't do anything"

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mrlaw (Aug 12, 2018 - 2:25 pm)

it's better than immigration law, anything is.

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patenttrollnj (Aug 12, 2018 - 2:26 pm)

Here's the thing: NONE of this stuff would be a problem if there were only fewer attorneys.

The fault, as always, is with the law schools and the ABA.

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therewillbeblood (Aug 12, 2018 - 8:06 pm)

Moderate high-worth individuals can make a nice practice. I worked for a firm where we had high-prestige, reported-on-CNN cases, high-end complex commercial litigation we bragged about, etc. etc., but so much of the bread and butter income was high-worth divorces that everyone hated to do but were such a secure source of income. The great thing about divorces is (a) oftentimes the wealthy spouse is paying, so the other (usually the wife) feels little compunction about keeping billable hours down, and (b) people in divorces usually go out of their minds, so they want to litigate everything no matter what the cost.

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paradactyl (Aug 13, 2018 - 9:25 am)

100% spot on. We should also warn the OP that having well-heeled clientele in a New York City Family Law practice is a double edged sword. It has been my experience that most wealthy clients in NY divorce actions know the value of a dollar and will be sure to get their money's worth out of their attorneys. Be prepared for a daily cascade of emails, frantic "emergency" phone calls about the ex wanting to extend the Tuesday night visitation with the kids by a whopping 15 extra minutes, and a near endless stream of criticism when things don't go their way. These people have nannies, personal chefs, personal trainers, drivers and maids; most will treat attorneys just like any other servant.

There are some notable exceptions. We've had some rich clients who are total sweethearts. But when they're bad; they're horrible. And unlike middle and lower income clients, it's reeeeeaaaalllly hard to let them go. Especially if they always pay their bills on time.

I once saw a client weeping in our conference room when she was told that she would *only* be receiving $21 million from her settlement. This is on top of property that was already divided up.

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