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How do you get a job during 2L fall?

I am a 2L in my fall semester at a school in Texas. I am tak ohboy09/05/18
Go to networking events, alumni events, reach out to alumni jmoney09/05/18
You apply to summer programs and/or hit up small/medium firm isthisit09/05/18
Some students I knew cold-called local small firms and asked porochi09/06/18
Symplicity and then the Law School Clinics. Did crim defense esquirewalletsmatter09/06/18
I attended several election parties for local judges the sum mikeisright09/06/18
Network really really hard, be a shameless self promoter, es mtbislife09/06/18
At the risk of sounding like a broken record, you need to ne thirdtierlaw09/06/18
This is gold. Note that most people cannot do this because mikeisright09/06/18
To add to the discussion, if you have an adjunct professor w wallypancake09/06/18
Nope, everyone’s wrong. Look for firms that are in your ar confused1l9309/13/18
No one is smarter than confused1l93. isthisit09/14/18
You should volunteer in pro bono/legal clinic and apply for ipesq09/14/18
ohboy (Sep 5, 2018 - 7:27 pm)

I am a 2L in my fall semester at a school in Texas. I am taking about 14 hours, but I wanted to get some experience as well. My school has a jobs forum that I have been using, but it doesn't have much. Did anyone here try other routes while they were in school to find part time work with a small firm or solo?

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jmoney (Sep 5, 2018 - 11:51 pm)

Go to networking events, alumni events, reach out to alumni in the area, reach out to every lawyer within your area. Say who you are, ask to meet to discuss practicing in the area. At said meeting mention you're looking for a clerking gig and most attorneys at that point will try to help you find something if they've agreed to meet.

Go shake some hands

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isthisit (Sep 5, 2018 - 11:55 pm)

You apply to summer programs and/or hit up small/medium firms for a summer clerk job.

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porochi (Sep 6, 2018 - 2:11 am)

Some students I knew cold-called local small firms and asked to volunteer in exchange for some experience. It worked for some, they got some law clerk experience, had to work for free, and the solo's, small firms, got free help. They'd often toss a minor research project their way. Nothing I wanted to try but some shameless students desperate for some experience and a resume bullet point did that. Target solo PI attys. They seemed to be the ones that'd respond.

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esquirewalletsmatter (Sep 6, 2018 - 11:28 am)

Symplicity and then the Law School Clinics. Did crim defense internship thru Symplicity then Civil Rights/Habeas Corpus/Family Law/ 2 judicial externships from the Clinic. Had more damn experience in law school than when I practiced.

Oh yeah, then picked up another internship from one of the attys I worked with stayed there for rest of law school (PI, municipal defense, Solicitor's work, some family and commercial) and started there PT thereafter while I was finding other work. In the end, it worked out. Just hustle hard.

Bonus points for getting a library job and stacking the work to stay within any ABA requirements to boot.

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mikeisright (Sep 6, 2018 - 10:44 am)

I attended several election parties for local judges the summer after 1L year after giving up on my school's career services office. All of these parties were well-attended by attorneys and provided many networking opportunities. I eventually landed a summer clerkship at a decent-sized collection mill that morphed into a clerkship for the next 2 years and turned into a job after graduation.

You need to WORK THE ROOM. I hit up the buffet multiple times and made small talk with the people around me. It's a shotgun approach and most encounters end up being polite rejections, but it did pay off.

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mtbislife (Sep 6, 2018 - 11:47 am)

Network really really hard, be a shameless self promoter, essentially beg for a job without it looking like you’re begging for a job and maybe one day you can work at a BK or PI mill making 45k after graduation.

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thirdtierlaw (Sep 6, 2018 - 12:15 pm)

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, you need to network like crazy. You should talk to every alumni within 40 miles of where you're living. Send them an e-mail introducing yourself and ask if you can buy them a cup of coffee for 30 minutes of their time. Some will just ignore you, some will turn you down, but you'll get a few that'll meet. Talk with them, get to know them, towards the end ask if they know anyone looking for an intern. And even if they don't ask, if there is anyone else they know that they think it'd be good for you to meet.

Then you reach out to that person, while dropping person number 1's name. Rinse and repeat as you work your way up to people in higher and more important positions. You'll eventually find someone who'll let you intern for them. But even if you didn't, this networking will be invaluable if you plan to stay in the area after school. It'll both help you find a job, but it'll also help you generate work once you are employed.


If you work at it, it's amazing how far up the ladder you can get with informational interview. I was able to turn my informational interviews into a midlaw job offer and an internship/job with where I'm currently working. I also found myself having an informational interview with the A.G. of my state and then after that the governor. The only reason I'm sharing my success is that so many people hear, "network" then they roll their eyes and mutter, that'll never lead anywhere. It blows my mind that most law students do not do this. The good news for you, if you actually do take the advice, you seem like a "go-getter" and a "hustler," which are two good qualities if you want to be an attorney.

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mikeisright (Sep 6, 2018 - 2:13 pm)

This is gold. Note that most people cannot do this because of fear of rejection. Remind yourself that once you land a clerkship or job, no one is going to care how many rejections you experienced. Also, none of the people who reject you will remember or care, so you shouldn't either.

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wallypancake (Sep 6, 2018 - 4:30 pm)

To add to the discussion, if you have an adjunct professor who has a practice, approach him or her and ask for some work. Those people would be the most in tune with the competitive nature of getting a job in law school.

Similarly, ask a judge for some work. Even if the work is not that glamorous, it is still worth it to see the process. Even if that judge is a family law or landlord/tenant judge, it is still experience. No one will expect you to become a "high stakes" divorce litigator just because you worked for a family law judge during the fall of your 2L year.

Also, look at government jobs, they may be interested in bringing on a 2L law student to help out with some issues.

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confused1l93 (Sep 13, 2018 - 11:33 pm)

Nope, everyone’s wrong. Look for firms that are in your area that could use someone like you or you can convince someone they can use someone like you. Then call them

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isthisit (Sep 14, 2018 - 10:45 am)

No one is smarter than confused1l93.

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ipesq (Sep 14, 2018 - 4:09 pm)

You should volunteer in pro bono/legal clinic and apply for public interest fellowship if your school offers them.

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