Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

redline vs. blackline

whats the diff? thelegalwhore09/17/18
Shocks or struts? Tofu or paneer? Rabbit or hare? Mushroo wallypancake09/17/18
One is in red and easily readable and the other is in black isthisit09/17/18
There is no difference. For example, if you press the "compa onehell09/17/18
These days, Redline = Changes made in Microsoft Word's t cargo09/20/18
It's true that Word calls the feature "track changes" if you onehell09/21/18
Reminds me of using horn books for property in law school. R wallypancake09/20/18
thelegalwhore (Sep 17, 2018 - 9:16 am)

whats the diff?

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wallypancake (Sep 17, 2018 - 11:45 am)

Shocks or struts?
Tofu or paneer?
Rabbit or hare?
Mushrooms or toadstools?

Reply
isthisit (Sep 17, 2018 - 12:45 pm)

One is in red and easily readable and the other is in black and more harder to follow.

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onehell (Sep 17, 2018 - 5:19 pm)

There is no difference. For example, if you press the "compare two versions" button in MS Word, the menu option calls it a "legal blackline" even though the changes still show in red.

I suspect some older-fashioned types call it a blackline because that is how it would've looked back in the day when you were taking stuff off the typewriter/marking it up by hand and faxing it back and forth in B&W. But even when you get something that someone calls a "blackline," the actual lines nowadays are still color when you open up the file.

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cargo (Sep 20, 2018 - 1:48 am)

These days,

Redline = Changes made in Microsoft Word's track changes feature (normal, and used by most transactional attorneys)

Blackline = Changes made via putting your additions in bold/underline, and your deletions in italics. Guaranteed to annoy the hell out of opposing counsel, and will result in opposing counsel striking out your changes out of spite due to how annoying they are to review.

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onehell (Sep 21, 2018 - 12:24 pm)

It's true that Word calls the feature "track changes" if you're doing it in as you edit. But if you get two clean versions of a document without marked changes, word can automatically compare the two and retroactively create a tracked-changes version, which it specifically calls a "blackline" in the menus. So I think it's synonymous.

https://support.office.com/en-ie/article/Compare-document-differences-using-the-legal-blackline-option-dbfc7351-4022-43a2-a0c4-54d1898702a0

Also, Wikipedia says:

Prior to personal computers, document comparison entailed the printing of two versions of a single document and reviewing those hard copies in detail for changes and version amendment. Included in this process were the potential for human error and the expansive administrative time necessitated by this arduous process. A ruler was used with a red pen to draw strike-through lines of deleted text and double-underline inserted text. The term "redline" came from using a red pen on the original/current version. When the document was placed in a copy machine, the copies came out black, thus the term "blackline."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Document_comparison

Granted, the only source Wikipedia was able to cite to was the "personal experience" of some legal secretary, but it certainly seems plausible to me as mentioned above that the terms are synonymous now, but previously reflective of a distinction associated with the pre-computer world.

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wallypancake (Sep 20, 2018 - 8:57 am)

Reminds me of using horn books for property in law school. Real properties, based on old English Common law writings, are referred to as whiteacre and blackacre. The horn books refer to the properties as blueacre, orangeacre, yellowacre, as if there is a racial side to it.

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