Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Is Damon Chetson still successful (law grad going solo and immediately making $160,000+)?

Awhile ago this article appeared on JDU: http://www.nbcnews. kappel10/28/18
Looks like he has a standard DWI mill going now. https://www billcarson10/28/18
As a low-paid associate in family law, I'm starting to belie kappel10/28/18
DUIs can be great and they are pretty rote after your first thirdtierlaw10/28/18
Thank you very much for the insight! As someone who has no e kappel10/28/18
Get on westlaw or whatever you use and get familiar with wha thirdtierlaw10/28/18
thirdtierlaw, thank you so much!!! My throwaway email is: co kappel10/29/18
Sent thirdtierlaw10/29/18
Just replied. Once again, thank you very much!!! kappel10/30/18
After meeting many of the aggressive advertiser mill owners, superttthero10/29/18
Yup. The Prenda Law guys, Mann Bracken bros, and now the deb billcarson10/29/18
I agree. More power to them if they can get the money and ge superttthero10/29/18
Somewhat off topic, but regarding the bogus proof of service onehell10/29/18
billcarson, no, I would never endorse those guys. If you've kappel10/30/18
super, I know that you had a horrible experience at a nation kappel10/30/18
kappel (Oct 28, 2018 - 2:58 pm)

Awhile ago this article appeared on JDU: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/43442917/ns/business-careers/t/law-grads-going-solo-loving-it/#.W9X_iZNKiM8.

My admiration for Damon was so great, that I began following his posts on bloodhoundblog.com. According to the blog, his revenue was $200,000. This was his first year as a solo immediately out of law school! Note that this was in 2009-2010, a time when there was a horror story after horror story on JDU. Damon achieved his success as a solo because he ran his business as a BUSINESSMAN and not just as a lawyer. He was not afraid to advertise and market in the best way he knew how. He also actively managed his business and did not forget to do quality work for his clients.

While reading bloodhoundblog.com, I came across this article: https://www.habitat.org/stories/supplying-unique-house-restore-building-materials. You have to admire a man who graduated law school in serious debt and in a few years had a successful business, paid off his student loans, and built his dream home. He also bought a small airplane, according to the blog.

You have to admire a man who graduated law school in the circumstances he did, at a time when he did, and was able to become successful at such a quick rate.

Does anyone know if he is still successful?

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billcarson (Oct 28, 2018 - 3:55 pm)

Looks like he has a standard DWI mill going now. https://www.chetson.com/

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kappel (Oct 28, 2018 - 4:06 pm)

As a low-paid associate in family law, I'm starting to believe that I would MUCH rather have a DUI Mill than do what I do now.

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thirdtierlaw (Oct 28, 2018 - 4:29 pm)

DUIs can be great and they are pretty rote after your first few. There are only so many ways to challenge a DUI so after those first few suppression hearings you've got your motion templates locked in.

They are also a great way to appear like your're fighting hard for your client. They get to see you cross examine the police the at the civil suspension hearing and see you argue your motion. So they really feel like they are getting their money's worth.

Also most prosecutors have a set DUI #1 resolutoon. So you already know how it ends before you begin. Most people who come to you with a DUI 1 is experiencing the criminal justice system for the first time. They're reading the max penalty and think they're going to jail. (as shout out to those drinking and driving commercials), so when you get them a wet negOP, or fine only they think you're a superstar.

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kappel (Oct 28, 2018 - 5:44 pm)

Thank you very much for the insight! As someone who has no experience in DUIs, what would you suggest would be the best way for me to learn them? Any good guides or manuals?

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thirdtierlaw (Oct 28, 2018 - 6:16 pm)

Get on westlaw or whatever you use and get familiar with what your state allows for stops, exit orders, etc. I'd say well over half of successful DUI defenses are won by challenging the initial stop and questioning.

The American Prosecutor Research institute used to have, they maybe still do, guides to handle specific DUI defenses. I stumbled upon them by accident at one point and they are great for ideas on how to defend against DUIs, your using the manuals for the opposite purpose they were designed for.

If you have a throw away address, I can see if I can still get into my throw away email and send you the few random ones I still have in my dropbox. I'll add the caveat that I haven't read them in years, so make sure they aren't out of date and/or whether they've been updated. But even if out of date, itll give you some really good starting points.

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kappel (Oct 29, 2018 - 12:14 am)

thirdtierlaw, thank you so much!!! My throwaway email is: [email protected]

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thirdtierlaw (Oct 29, 2018 - 10:29 am)

Sent

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kappel (Oct 30, 2018 - 2:01 am)

Just replied. Once again, thank you very much!!!

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superttthero (Oct 29, 2018 - 3:42 pm)

After meeting many of the aggressive advertiser mill owners, I've learend they are usually riding the line of ethics (in advertising, employment, and work performed) to the limit and beyond, mostly capitalizing on how unsophisticated clients are and on 'associates' desperate for any job to get away with it.

Maybe this dude was different, but it's hard for me to "admire" any of them without intimately knowing they're upstanding attorneys.... my first instinct is that guys like this are con men operating on the very edge of the safe side of legality.

Even just what you posted here... unless he lucked into a few slam dunk PI cases, the idea he made $200k as a know-nothing fresh-out-of-law-school-solo makes him highly suspect in my eyes.

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billcarson (Oct 29, 2018 - 3:48 pm)

Yup. The Prenda Law guys, Mann Bracken bros, and now the debt settlement ponzis all were run by fresh faced outlaws. I could be a millionaire if I invented fake debt and sued random people in the phone book using bogus proof of service. That is to say its as legal as selling imaginary real estate.

That said, I don’t think OP dude would be going still if that was the case. As to “skirting” the ethics rules... well, caveat emptor. If he doesn’t break the rule, then Joe Schmoe gets what his $200 over cost “DWI King” offers even if Partner & Partner PLLC could provide a better, seamless, less stressful service for $1,000 over cost

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superttthero (Oct 29, 2018 - 3:51 pm)

I agree. More power to them if they can get the money and get away with it.

Just saying that's not how I can operate (for a shameful mix of conscious and lack of self-esteem), so I cant admire them, but I dont hate the player.... or something.

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onehell (Oct 29, 2018 - 4:25 pm)

Somewhat off topic, but regarding the bogus proof of service technique, I ran into an interesting law firm scam in the "reputation management" practice area recently.

So what this law firm was doing is there would be some content, like a bad review, appearing online. The business owner would contract with a reputation management company (not a law firm) to try and get the post removed.

The reputation company would then refer the case to the law firm. They would give the law firm the name of the person they claimed to be responsible for the content, and the law firm would sue that person for defamation.

The trick was that the defendant was a strawman who had been paid by the reputation management company to pretend to be the person who wrote the review. The strawman would accept service and promptly stip to an injunction. Google/Yelp/etc would then honor that injunction, and the content would be removed even though it may well have been true.

It wasn't discovered for years, not until someone who actually wrote one of these reviews took the time to figure out why their post had been removed and complain to the bar. The law firm's defense of course is that it too was duped by the reputation management company, but the bar doesn't seem to be buying it and thinks they were in cahoots.

The moral of the story to me is that defaults and stips where the defendant makes no effort whatsoever to defend the matter should be inherently suspicious. But judges with crowded dockets presented with an opportunity to get something off their desk don't exactly have an incentive to ask any questions.

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kappel (Oct 30, 2018 - 2:09 am)

billcarson, no, I would never endorse those guys. If you've noticed, in my threads I always endorse lawyers who know how to be businesspeople but who still make an effort to do quality work for their clients. I don't endorse scammers.

I am considering making a thread endorsing Alexander Shunnarah, on the other hand. There is just something about that guy...

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kappel (Oct 30, 2018 - 2:06 am)

super, I know that you had a horrible experience at a national immigration mill. Judging by what you wrote about that position, you probably worked at Margaret Wong's firm. Don't confirm/deny if you think it will out you. And your bankruptcy mill experience was even worse. But, I have seen absolutely no indication that Damon is doing anything unethical. I have not found any hint of anything illegal or frowned upon by rules governing legal ethics.

Damon was VERY good at marketing.

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