Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Regret leaving the law?

Have any of you stopped practicing law, moved into another f somemoarplease12/14/18
Not one iota. fuckyouracists12/15/18
I was in criminal litigation for about seven years and burne lawst12/19/18
Absolutely not. I litigated for about 5 years. Was a wild lawyer197201/12/19
Also.... She was able to start the business because we co lawyer197201/12/19
I knew an attorney who wanted out of law so bad, he and his jeffm12/14/18
There is no f u element in law and that raises the stress le demwave12/14/18
One of the problems is that to move out of my current positi somemoarplease12/15/18
You sound like you might be attached to your "status" in lif jeffm12/15/18
Thanks Jeff, and everyone else as well. One thing that never somemoarplease12/15/18
Coming up on 4 years removed from law and I have no regrets flyer1412/14/18
People leave for different reasons. Some can hardly get sta jeffm12/14/18
Hell no!! What I regret is getting a job practicing law patenttrollnj12/14/18
LOL, I remember panicking, thinking I was "ancient" in my la catwoman33312/14/18
I appreciate your positive encouragement, but at some point patenttrollnj12/14/18
Thanks for sharing. I am in my 30s and I am really feeling t somemoarplease12/15/18
OK, I'll share a little. Firstly, being pigeon-holed is p patenttrollnj12/15/18
I regret not getting out of law. I've been in it too long no fettywap12/14/18
I did the opposite. I used to work finance, and switched to dingbat12/14/18
You sound like you really want a "guarantee" that any career catwoman33312/14/18
Thanks for the thoughts and info catwoman. I'm not looking f somemoarplease12/15/18
Bored with litigation? LOL! That's me. We might have jeffm12/15/18
Just curious jeffm what is your net worth and are you marrie demwave12/15/18
I think someone here tried to guess I was worth a net of $4m jeffm12/15/18
Thanks for your thoughts, somearplease. In the end, the catwoman33312/15/18
I've been out of law for about 3 years now. I graduated when drwayoflife12/15/18
I left law 5 years ago and landed in a quasi-legal position nonlinearjdmba12/15/18
OP, you should head out to LA and check out the glut of yoga wallypancake12/19/18
Just like lawlyers? triplesix12/27/18
If you ever do quasi-legal, be careful because you are an of magellan12/27/18
Hi OP, I practiced in small firms in the Midwest from 2000 t tina01/12/19
Dear tina: Very interesting story, and congratulations. larrywilliams01/12/19
$5 says it's the clients that have no conscience at all abou jeffm01/13/19
I left to get a MD. Now work as a neuro resident. I am b bigsal01/12/19
No regret whatsoever. Prior to working in litigation, I had jj8201/14/19

somemoarplease (Dec 14, 2018 - 4:43 pm)

Have any of you stopped practicing law, moved into another field and lived to regret it? I've been practicing for about 8 years (some as plaintiff, some as defense, now in ID for about 5 years), and I think I have hit the point where I can comfortably say I do not enjoy what I do. Depositions are not fun anymore. Writing complex briefs, believe it or not, used to be fun, but no longer. I used to think it was that each firm had issues that tainted the job for me, but I've just realized that there are certain environmental factors that are intrinsic to law practice (specifically litigation) that don't do it for me. I don't consider myself an amazing attorney, but I'd like to think that I work hard, and, more often than not, that hard work yields favorable results in the courtroom.

I am curious to know if anyone shifted gears to an area outside of the law (or perhaps quasi-legal?) and lived to regret it. I feel like I either need to accept that this is my reality and continue on this trajectory, or take a risk and find out if there is something slightly less soul-sucking. My concern is that I leave this job, take a pay cut for something that looks great but then regret the "potential of the law." For example, I know of someone who took a claims counsel position thinking it would be life changing and it was basically the same in terms of stress, workload, etc., even though they were no longer trying cases. Right now, at best, I see my current trajectory leading to partnership (I do not have an interest because of the unique responsibilities at this firm and need to take care of my fam).

Sorry if this is a messy post, just trying to get some stories or thoughts from people who have felt this way, or had the guts to make a move. I have my eye on some non-attorney positions that would require a pay cut but seem accessible to me due to personal connections or my experience, but I am not sure I can pull the trigger.

Thanks.

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fuckyouracists (Dec 15, 2018 - 5:30 pm)

Not one iota.

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lawst (Dec 19, 2018 - 8:58 am)

I was in criminal litigation for about seven years and burned out pretty badly. I knew I didn’t want to be a private defense attorney because there are a million of those. So I became a decision writer for the SSA. I feel like I turned in my law license when I joined the agency. This is one of the least intellectually challenging or engaging positions I’ve ever had in my life. Litigation provided much more challenge. I also had more autonomy and authority. I have basically zero with the ssa. It may not be this way in all ssa hearing offices, but it’s how I feel in mine. So, in short I miss some things about litigation. I don’t miss the stress though.

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lawyer1972 (Jan 12, 2019 - 7:26 am)

Absolutely not.

I litigated for about 5 years. Was a wild dog. In house counsel, had my own caseload, managed and controlled the legal dept. During that time I developed a drinking problem and was overweight.

Now, I work for the govmint, making near 6 figures, full pension, union, PSLF (loan payment is 25% what it was in private sector).

Office politics in govmint are clique-ish but bearable most the time. Barely touch alcohol, quit smoking, lost the weight.

Interestingly enough, the ole wifearuno started a business a few years back and it has been quite successful. I get to use my legal knowledge to help her write contracts and deal with employees....

Not a bad turn of events. Thx to the scambloggers though, I stopped blaming myself (did this for years) for not getting biglaw.

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lawyer1972 (Jan 12, 2019 - 7:36 am)

Also....

She was able to start the business because we could rely on my income due to the fact the we live way below our means-borrowing the obscene amount of law school loans taught me this lesson in life, plus she did not need health insurance because she is on mine.

I tell EVERYONE about the law school scam and discourage prospective students. I used to be silent and ashamed, no more. I even call and yell at counselors at my school telling them to quit their jobs and rethink their lives when I have a bad day, just because. Lol.

Sometimes I email them Campos articles, again, just because....

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jeffm (Dec 14, 2018 - 5:29 pm)

I knew an attorney who wanted out of law so bad, he and his wife opened a bakery. After several months in the bakery, he said the bakery was killing him. He did not want to go back to law, though, but was talking about doing it.

Why are you afraid to pull the trigger?

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demwave (Dec 14, 2018 - 6:04 pm)

There is no f u element in law and that raises the stress level. You can never coast working for someone else and when working for yourself you can coast but don't want to. So you can never RELAX which makes it s*ck or about to s*ck.

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somemoarplease (Dec 15, 2018 - 9:24 am)

One of the problems is that to move out of my current position would likely require taking a paycut (I took a paycut on paper to get into my current position, though it evens out if you consider certain beenfits). I have a spouse to consider who may frown on such a move, but I do believe moving out of the law would improve our quality of life since, in theory, I would be around more for our personal life. Plus, and this is just my opinion, sometimes making the extra money isn't worth the extra stress, work b.s., and quality of life issues.

A second problem is that I am aware that the grass is not always greener. I am not sure I would have the cojones of your friend to start my own business, but what if I end up just as miserable in a lesser paying position? It's the "devil you know" issue. And as your baker friend may be wondering for himself, if I can't manage working outside the law, am I even going to be able to come back to it after leaving (meaning will any firm take me back)?

I think that my career path is either leading to partnership or opening my own firm, and I don't think that I would enjoy either. I just don't want to look back "x" number of years from now and regret not making the jump. Like so many others in this position, I feel stuck, and it is much easier to complain and stick around than make a move...but I am getting closer and closer to just making a move.

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jeffm (Dec 15, 2018 - 9:45 am)

You sound like you might be attached to your "status" in life. Basically, this means you care about what others will think if you have to scale down to become happy. It's a valid concern.

I took a sabbatical for a while. The endless fighting and teeth-pulling of litigation ground on me pretty hard, and I was quite sure I had had enough of it. I didn't know whether I would need a 1-2 month sabbatical or if I was permanently checking-out.

I didn't practice for probably 2-3 years and lived on savings. Savings are not enough for a permanent free ride, and it came to the point where I needed to earn some $$$ again. I did not go back into litigation. I got back in and started taking transactional stuff here and there. I've been back at it for about 1.5 years. I am not as busy, so the income has taken a hit, but it's quite a lot better than 0.

I am now in the frame of mind where I will do the "right" litigation. This means a summary judgment type of issue, an appeal, or just something I find to be intellectually interesting and worth a fight. I have been coming across very little of that and turn down $hitlaw litigation all the time.

At this point, I live more cheaply, need less money, have more time, cherry-pick the law for the easy stuff, stay physically fit and just have an easy life. I know there are other career choices which could be made to accomplish something similar, but (and this applies to you) I am trained in law. I don't need to spend more money to make the change. I don't need to wonder whether I will like something I am trying for the first time. I don't need to abandon the "status" of being a lawyer (fwiw, and it's worth a little for sure).

Your experience will vary, but if you can cherry pick legal work to get out of litigation, you might find life becomes a whole lot easier and more enjoyable with far less stress and anxiety. Like it has for me so far, this might mean you have to make changes to make you less reliant on a higher income. Otherwise, a simple move to a transaction firm (for example) might just mean nothing more than a change in venue where you get grilled and pressured just the same as now. There is much to be said for working minimally and not having to punch a clock.

Good luck! There is no answer. You just have to do what you can to make it happen.

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somemoarplease (Dec 15, 2018 - 10:19 am)

Thanks Jeff, and everyone else as well. One thing that never occurred to me as a real option was taking a sort of sabbatical because I never considered the possibility that I could hop back into the law if I hopped out (even for a break). If I am being honest with myself, it may be possible that I would feel different if I stop "lawyering" for a few months. I really don't know. But all of your comments have given me more to think about, so thank you and good luck to everyone.

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flyer14 (Dec 14, 2018 - 6:05 pm)

Coming up on 4 years removed from law and I have no regrets about leaving whatsoever.

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jeffm (Dec 14, 2018 - 6:30 pm)

People leave for different reasons. Some can hardly get started and decide it's futile. Everyone's experiences will vary.

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patenttrollnj (Dec 14, 2018 - 7:01 pm)

Hell no!!

What I regret is getting a job practicing law in the first place. I wish I had NEVER got a job out of law school. EVERYTHING about the practice of law (outside a handful of career trajectories) is a waste of time, and then you hit a certain age and you "age out." Thus, what do we have left?

I'm in my mid-40s and taking steps towards doing something else. This is all out of necessity. What I find the most frustrating is that so many avenues are closed due to my age, and what is left to choose from is rather disappointing. Still, I'm grateful that I'm just in my 40s and not even older.

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catwoman333 (Dec 14, 2018 - 10:51 pm)

LOL, I remember panicking, thinking I was "ancient" in my late 20s.

Seriously, what is the "magic number" (expiration date or age) after which you cannot change direction--personally or in a career--in life???

"If you think you can, you probably can. If you think you can't, you probably can't." IMHO, you are limited more by your fears, mindset than by anything else.

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patenttrollnj (Dec 14, 2018 - 11:28 pm)

I appreciate your positive encouragement, but at some point a practical consideration must be made.

In your mid 40s, becoming, for example, an electrical engineer is not that smart an idea. Sure, one could get the degree, but it comes at great cost, a considerable time investment, and with great risk. So, is it practical?

One needs to be careful and not so impulsive.

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somemoarplease (Dec 15, 2018 - 9:44 am)

Thanks for sharing. I am in my 30s and I am really feeling the sting of time. Sometimes I blink and it feels like a year has passed. One of my concerns is what you are dealing with right now...I am not sure how marketable I am now, but I feel like I will only get more pidgeon-holed if I stick around even longer. To the extent that you are willing or able to share, what are the reasons you are taking steps to move out? For me, it's quality of life and not enjoying the work. I am not sure what your personal circumstances are, but I give you a lot of credit for trying to move on to something else.

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patenttrollnj (Dec 15, 2018 - 1:10 pm)

OK, I'll share a little.

Firstly, being pigeon-holed is precisely what happened to me. As a patent/trademark lawyer, I was doing something very unusual. Now, just imagine what happened when I tried to leverage that experience while applying for jobs in compliance and/or risk management.

The other issue, of course, is that I "aged out" of law. I've been doing this for 15 years, and this whole time it was at small firms. Without a book of business, advancing is not really possible anymore, plus all the in-house jobs go to people from biglaw (and even biglaw rejects have a hard time getting them).

Thus, my reason for leaving law has nothing to do with quality of life and/or not liking the work (although, to be honest, prosecuting patents is about as exciting as watching fungus grow). I'm leaving law because I've "aged out" and can no longer advance in this career.

In truth, if I really wanted, i could probably get some underpaid "blah" job being a lawyer in some unremarkable firm somewhere, but I've pretty much lost my patience with that. Patent law may not be quite as intellectual as some people think, but it still requires some degree of thinking beyond most other legal specialties.

My advice to you: GET OUT! You can still do in your 30s (almost) anything you could have done in your 20s, so make a decision and go for it. By the time you hit your 40s, practical/financial considerations start to set-in. I'm lucky in that I don't have kids, so I have some flexibility there.

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fettywap (Dec 14, 2018 - 7:18 pm)

I regret not getting out of law. I've been in it too long now to find a job in another field.

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dingbat (Dec 14, 2018 - 7:45 pm)

I did the opposite. I used to work finance, and switched to law as a lifestyle choice. No regrets whatsoever.

I've had a lot of friends who've made career switches. For some it was a fairly parallel move, for others it was a complete change. For some it was great, others it was fairly meh, and for some it was a disaster.

Be very careful about what your move. You could find yourself in a worse position with no way back.

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catwoman333 (Dec 14, 2018 - 11:37 pm)

You sound like you really want a "guarantee" that any career change will be "risk free" or "regret-free". OMG, I wish life were like that! LOL

If you are bored out of your mind and certain the source of the boredom is the career (law practice), not other issues (clients, judges, coworkers, boss), then by all means CHANGE CAREERS. Where is it written that you cannot explore other options in life? The worst that can happen is you try something else, then realize it isn't what you wanted. So what? You can always return to ID or some other practice in the law.

I, too, have been practicing solo for about a decade and DEFINITELY have "soul-sucking" days like that, where I feel drained to the core, dealing with angry people (clients, judges) and worrying about fluctuating income and paying my own health ins./taxes every month. My favorite fantasy is chucking it all and opening (or working in) a flower shop--flowers and plants are "low maintenance" and don't argue with you...:).

I have explored other law-related options, even applied for and been offered a few other jobs in the legal field (AA jobs in gov. agency offices). I ended up declining them, primarily because I realized how thankless (little oppty for promotion), high stress/turnover they were and that I would probably quickly be miserable, burn out working in a faceless, high production/volume large bureaucracy, churning out boilerplate agency decisions 24/7, however steady the income:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnbNcQlzV-4


I think it's a good idea, normal exercise in sanity THROUGHOUT LIFE to "take stock" and ask yourself: "Am I content doing this?" Doing so made me realize, overall, how fortunate I am where I am now, I can always change later, and that despite having difficult days, I really would miss the current "freedom"/flexibility of a solo work schedule. I also realized that being burned out is probably pretty standard in ANY career at some point, and that many other people have it A LOT worse than I do.

Good luck with whatever path you choose.

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somemoarplease (Dec 15, 2018 - 10:14 am)

Thanks for the thoughts and info catwoman. I'm not looking for any guarantees, we all know those don't exist unfortunately. I was just wondering how other people have felt about this issue and if they regretted making what they thought to be a great decision about making a career change. Sometimes you have the answer somewhere in your brain about what to do but need to hear it from other people to push you to either side. My gut is telling me to make the move, but the issues I discussed above ultimately keep me in check.

The boredom on my part is the practice itself. There probably was a time where I was over-stressed because of clients, nasty judges, tight deadlines, etc., but I've reached that zen point where I just do my job and figure it out relatively stress free. The soul-sucking aspect of the job for me is that it is Groundhog Day every day, and aside from some friendly relationships in the office, I derive 0% enjoyment in what I do. I've worked in a lot more mundane jobs than this and yet I have never felt this quite this empty. I work hard and care about the work because its important, but ultimately I get no satisfaction from it.

I am glad to hear that you are happy where you are even if you have your tough days.

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jeffm (Dec 15, 2018 - 10:49 am)

Bored with litigation? LOL! That's me.

We might have similar personalities - meaning, I expect to get bored from any pursuit after I've pursued it long enough to realize I need to find a new rush.

This is another reason why staying in law and cherry-picking easy stuff is conducive to my personality. It leaves me with gobs of free time to pursue whatever I want - even stuff that doesn't pay (exercise, hobbies, etc.). If there comes along some kind of manna from heaven opportunity, I will likely not have a hard decision to make. I am free, with all kinds of time. All I need to do is follow my nose. In the meantime, I am not inundated with stuff that bores me and makes me resent it.

Lawyers' hourly rates translate into this in my mind: "I can pay all my bills on less than an hour a day." Where else can you do that? If you know, do tell. Most other career choices inundate you, and all you can do is hope it pays enough and you like it.

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demwave (Dec 15, 2018 - 1:05 pm)

Just curious jeffm what is your net worth and are you married? Do you generate any passive income outside of work?

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jeffm (Dec 15, 2018 - 4:04 pm)

I think someone here tried to guess I was worth a net of $4mm. I laughed out loud. My net worth is not enough, but I'm not broke, either.

A business partner and I have been working (and investing) a long time on a software project which we hope will bring better returns than practicing law. I'll reveal more about it when we're ready to beta test, which I *hope* will be rather soon. Let me just say that I've seen all kinds of posts on this forum where people think software development is the easy way to get out of law. All I do now when I see those is chuckle, but life is good!!! I really like our unique approach to solving a common problem a better way than current offerings.

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catwoman333 (Dec 15, 2018 - 7:26 pm)

Thanks for your thoughts, somearplease.

In the end, the only thing that matters is how YOU feel and whether you are willing to pay the price of CONTINUING to do a job that clearly makes you miserable for whatever reason (assuming there is nothing else you can do in that job--change your mindset or job duties--to make it more bearable). If that's the case, you essentially have 2 choices: 1) stay stuck in Groundhog Land out of fear of the unknown, uncertainty, etc. and remain miserable, or 2) make a change, celebrate your exit, and just be open to what happens next (good or bad)--in other words, moving forward in life. Not suggesting you change suddenly or without a "plan" (healthy savings in the bank or first landing another job or temp gig before you gracefully exit so you can continue to support yourself while you seek a better career fit).

Also, you say your job is no longer "fun". Forgive me for saying, but that expectation sounds a tad bit too unrealistic or "Gen Z-ish" (or perhaps you are just used to working in "party hardy offices")...LOL. I find that most jobs/careers--legal or not--are fraught with repetition/stress, esp. in this 24/7 fast-paced 21st century workplace where eventual boredom, burnout are pretty common. Or perhaps my experience has just been less than idyllic: while I enjoy new challenges and have often considered work "gratifying" or "interesting" (esp. when learning new areas of law), I can't honestly say I have EVER thought of law--or any job for that matter--as "fun" in a conventional sense. For me, work is just work. Nothing more. Fun is what I find and pursue OUTSIDE the workplace (when not dealing with deadlines, clients, boss's demands, etc).…:).

Don't overlook that your feeling could also be a classic case of chronic, low-grade anxiety/depression (boredom is a common symptom of those problems), poor sleep, not enough vacation time away from the office, and/or poor work/home balance. If your bar assn. or employer has an EAP program, touch base with them. They are usually free and confidential. I have found them very helpful in providing good advice, clarity, and perspective when I feel overwhelmed. Also, spend more time on your other interests/passions in life. So many lawyers work inhumane hours, they begin to feel as if they are nothing beyond their job identity. So sad! Personally, I find the more time I have to devote to my interests outside law (literature, photography), the less stress I feel about work and life in general. Good luck!

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drwayoflife (Dec 15, 2018 - 4:52 pm)

I've been out of law for about 3 years now. I graduated when I was 27 and left law at 29. I do have moments where I miss aspects of law practice. Some of the theory is still engaging. But those pass pretty quickly. I do not regret leaving. It was very difficult to leave and took me about one year and a lot of work to transition out, so I am heavily invested in my decision to leave. My real regret is going to law school in the first place without really knowing what the day-to-day life of a practicing attorney is like, which I found to be too confrontational and the transactions too zero-sum-game for my personality. Best of luck on your journey!

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nonlinearjdmba (Dec 15, 2018 - 5:33 pm)

I left law 5 years ago and landed in a quasi-legal position in financial services risk management. The hours are better, stress is lower on average, and the pay is about the same. However, I have a host of benefits I never had working in law (better 401k, stock purchase plan, extended paid parental leave, etc.), AND I actually like a lot of the people at the company, including my boss. It's amazing how much easier it is to stomach the grind when you like the folks you work with.

It was a tough decision to leave, but I don't regret it whatsoever.

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wallypancake (Dec 19, 2018 - 8:45 am)

OP, you should head out to LA and check out the glut of yoga studios. Many of those studios were started by former NYC and DC biglaw associates who burnt out and thought that they found the holy grail in LA yoga studios. Once they got there, they found out that yoga studios come a dime a dozen.

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triplesix (Dec 27, 2018 - 1:42 pm)

Just like lawlyers?

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magellan (Dec 27, 2018 - 1:23 pm)

If you ever do quasi-legal, be careful because you are an officer of the court. You'll be asked to do things within and outside your realm of expertise and subsequently have the same sentiment or worse that you have now. Sometimes, tedious work isn't so bad. You might want to find a hobby to compliment your work (e.g., travel if you can afford it, athletics, etc.). If you're young enough, you can branch into quasi; otherwise, I'd spend the weekends cranking out your resume to other opportunities or networking with family, friends and/or friends of friends.

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tina (Jan 12, 2019 - 3:02 am)

Hi OP, I practiced in small firms in the Midwest from 2000 thru 2014, the last part of that period post 2009 as a solo. I did transactional/tax/RE, got an LL.M. in 2001. I experienced a fair amount of gender discrimination at the shops I worked at, the girl lawyer gets the cubicle by the door and not the office with the door, at two of the shops I toiled in. The crash in 2008 didn't help business for RE/tax work so that might not apply to all.

In the end, I just got super weary. Small firm tax practice has the worst clients ever, and small firm RE practice started to feel like having to kill a bear every month. So I got a job in house, non-counsel-title, in telecom doing contracts mgt/right of way. It was sort of lowering, but also much better stress-wise and the money seemed to end up better too. I did that for a year and a half and realized that right of way was a thing, and got some GIS technical training at night at the JuCo (mapping stuff). And started applying for municipal jobs with a pension doing real estate/right of way for public works.

I got the first in 2015, and moved to a slightly more compatible agency in 2018. I love it, I work 9/80 schedule with every other friday off, I don't take work home, it's interesting for me, and I get to go outside on site visits if I want to. And I have a pension growing, and my health benefits are incredible. I just got a gold crown on my back molar for $5.

I occasionally feel put upon because I have to ask legal counsel to approve things I should be able to determine, but that's bureaucracy. I occasionally feel like a loser because legal counsel who know less than me, in some cases who are truly idiots, make more money, but hey at least I am not bored at work which I feel sure they are since they spend most of their time opining on who can sign contracts at what level of $$, or doing discovery which I would hate. (of course if they are stupid enough I guess discovery responses might not be boring but this matters little as life is subjective)

I think practicing law works out for some people, but it did not for me. That said, I just waived in for a license at the state I recently moved to, so I guess I feel a need to keep that option open.

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larrywilliams (Jan 12, 2019 - 12:34 pm)

Dear tina:

Very interesting story, and congratulations.

You mentioned that the clients in a small firm tax practice were the "worst". If you don't mind my asking, what were some of your experiences along that line?

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jeffm (Jan 13, 2019 - 12:01 pm)

$5 says it's the clients that have no conscience at all about "making" their tax preparers fill out phony returns showing they don't make any money. I have heard this is the number one problem most CPA's experience in trying to compete and hang a shingle. If they don't help the client cheat, the client will quickly and easily find another CPA who will.

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bigsal (Jan 12, 2019 - 12:27 pm)

I left to get a MD. Now work as a neuro resident.

I am burned out in my medical position. Like I hate my job and boss.

I would leave in a heartbeat to be a psych resident since some of them make more than neuro attendings do.

However I have no regrets whatsoever about leaving law.

I have a steady salary; own my home and car; and have three years of pslf from residency.

I dont drink like I did in law. I usually am the most aggressive person in the doc box from my legal days. I dont have to fight with other lawyers.

As an added benefit, I get to hit on and bone random Asian nurses, pharmacists, and med students. The md is the ultimate p_ssy pass with Asian women.

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jj82 (Jan 14, 2019 - 9:08 am)

No regret whatsoever. Prior to working in litigation, I had worked in corporate world...and this framed and informed my perspective towards working in law and litigation specifically; the practice of law is an antiquated, primitive world. I would analogize working law vs. other corporate industries as trying to make fire with two twigs vs. using a lighter. That sensation coupled with the horrible, adversarial work product and atmosphere, as well poor benefits, office culture make law practice unpalatable. Many of the few remaining friends who still practice law went directly from undergrad. to law school and never worked in a "normal" corporate environment...so they are none the wiser.

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