Remembering TCPaul, 2016-2019

Switching state jobs

If I'm still in training in my current state job, and haven' fettywap02/05/19
Have you passed probation in your current position? If you l samson02/05/19
Switching jobs this quickly could send up a red flag. Don't a8464802/05/19
It depends. Agency #2 will certainly wonder why you want to catwoman33302/06/19
Do not do this. Not sure what your state's civil service ru toooldtocare02/06/19
People leave the current job all the time, because there's n fettywap02/06/19
All offices are different; in your OP you state you haven't toooldtocare02/06/19
It depends on the job. I had a coworker leave one of my stat downwardslope02/07/19
Depends on location, too, we never hired anyone who was at a toooldtocare02/07/19
Okay. It does make me a little nervous when the ad says they fettywap02/07/19
Many state jobs get their budgets approved all at one time. downwardslope02/07/19
fettywap (Feb 5, 2019 - 7:54 pm)

If I'm still in training in my current state job, and haven't been employed 6 months yet, is it a bad idea to apply for a job with a different state agency? Like will that get me in trouble with my current employer? One of the other state agencies is looking for attorneys who have the experience I've gained in my current position. Wondering if I would even be considered for it, and if it would get me in trouble with my current employer, or if they won't care.

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samson (Feb 5, 2019 - 8:03 pm)

Have you passed probation in your current position? If you leave before you pass probation and achieve permanent status, your current employer isn't required to take you back if you don't pass probation at your new job.

"Will I get in trouble?": You might get blacklisted at your current agency. I see it all the time.

I suggest you wait until you receive your NOPA of permanent status before leaving to another agency.

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a84648 (Feb 5, 2019 - 9:42 pm)

Switching jobs this quickly could send up a red flag. Don't switch till you have passed probation and get at least a year under your belt. Having less than six months experience will not likely get you a job and you should wait till you have a full cycle that results in an annual review. Make sure you do well on your annual review and get to know people who you can use as references for the future.

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catwoman333 (Feb 6, 2019 - 2:16 am)

It depends. Agency #2 will certainly wonder why you want to jump ship from Agency #1 job so soon. If Agency #2 job pays significantly more, a better fit for your long-term career plans, based on your cumulative experience, they might be understanding, esp. if they consider you a top finalist candidate.

The big issue is how you will feel if you apply, but aren't selected, then your current employer finds out you are looking elsewhere after only 6 months. That could really blow up in your face, ruin your current job. But if the current job/people are utterly intolerable/toxic, you won't care. Just leave as soon as you can.

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toooldtocare (Feb 6, 2019 - 9:25 am)

Do not do this. Not sure what your state's civil service rules are, but
1. If you are in a job where you are on probation, and when you finish probation are considered a "permanent" employee, never switch jobs until you are permanent, however long that takes. I've always been at will, but I do know some states have protections like this. If you switch jobs before becoming permanent, you often if not always lose time invested and start the clock over again.
2. Again, I was always at will but even if you are permanent, attempting to switch a job after only six months is a bad idea. The new agency will not hire you, and will have plenty of questions about "why switch so soon" and they think you'll leave them in six months. And your current office will think very, very poorly of you when they find out you are trying to leave. After all, they interviewed a ton of candidates, had to check references, and if you didn't really want the job, why did you take it? N.B.: I don't agree with this mentality, but that's the way it is. I had a boss who was constantly looking for a new job. However, if he found out anyone in our section was looking for a new job, he took it as a personal insult and reacted accordingly. I'm not saying that's right or fair, but I found out the hard way that there are rules that don't apply to bosses(I was the person looking for a new job and made the mistake of informing him. Yes, beyond incredibly stupid).
3. In the private sector, leaving a job after only six months is a big red flag. The only way to get around this would be some great reason, and telling them I stayed with agency x only long enough to get experience to move to agency y will not help you. Again, they'll think you'll leave them in six months.
And not saying this is fair or even reasonable, but that's the way employers think. It's all about them.

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fettywap (Feb 6, 2019 - 9:29 am)

People leave the current job all the time, because there's no pay raise or room for advancement. But okay. It takes a year to get off probation.

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toooldtocare (Feb 6, 2019 - 11:55 am)

All offices are different; in your OP you state you haven't been on the job even six months yet. The places I worked get so many resumes they would never consider anyone trying to switch jobs after less than six months. Not saying there's any rational basis for that, but that's the way it's always been. And good luck if they were to find out that a probationary employee was looking for another job; that person would soon have a new title: former employee.
And yes, people leave jobs all the time, but not usually after less than six months. I've never worked anywhere that hired a new employee who had been at their previous job less than six months. The only possible exception is if you work in a very specialized area, where it is almost impossible to fill your job. I've never held such a job, as I'm pretty easy to replace. And no, these rules don't apply to bosses; I've had several who were actively looking for new jobs while at the same time declaring an employee was no longer a "team player" or some such nonsense b/c that employee was looking for a new job.
But everybody's work experience is different; I've always had bosses who had the luxury of a deluge of applications, and bosses who applied different rules to their employees than themselves.

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downwardslope (Feb 7, 2019 - 9:21 am)

It depends on the job. I had a coworker leave one of my state jobs after 6 months and she has been at that second job coming up on 8 years now. I have also known several people in federal jobs who moved from one job to another within six months. It is really not all that uncommon. Within government, there are a lot of places that are known to be toxic and people might not last very long. I know there are some offices (I worked in one) where it was not uncommon for people not to make it a year. I stayed there less than a year before going back to my old state job in a different role and I think my replacement lasted something like 4 months.

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toooldtocare (Feb 7, 2019 - 9:36 am)

Depends on location, too, we never hired anyone who was at a job six months, and if you left at six months, they'd never re-hire. So maybe that's state specific.
What's not specific is probationary status; if you are still on probation, you should hang on until your probation is over and you are considered in permanent status. Again, never had that myself, as all my jobs were at will.

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fettywap (Feb 7, 2019 - 11:30 am)

Okay. It does make me a little nervous when the ad says they have several attorney positions available. Makes me think nobody wants to work there.

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downwardslope (Feb 7, 2019 - 2:23 pm)

Many state jobs get their budgets approved all at one time. They may have people leave over the course of a couple years but can’t actually fill them when they open. I know at my last job, when they were approved to hire, it was usually 2-3 people at one time or even 6-7 if they started a new position type.

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