Remembering TCPaul, 2016-2019

Non-JD Preference Jobs

I've seen several job ads for compliance or contracts roles saltlifesticker02/05/19
I'm not sure what you're looking at. The job ads I've been l fettywap02/05/19
No, I agree. Many of them do prefer JDs. But I'm starting to saltlifesticker02/05/19
"Non-JD" is just another way of saying "low paying job". catwoman33302/06/19
JD-preferred usually means that they would like a lawyer but wallypancake02/06/19
My all-time favorites: "Executive Assistant" (gopher or sec catwoman33302/06/19
What is your thoughts about roles that require you have to J beat12302/07/19
Completely anecdotal but my company has been filling JD Pref barelylegal02/06/19
I am a hiring manager for these sorts of positions at my Big latinforliar02/07/19
Every once in awhile, particularly during the height of the onehell02/07/19
saltlifesticker (Feb 5, 2019 - 8:54 pm)

I've seen several job ads for compliance or contracts roles that state, "preference will be given to non-JD candidates."

I think maybe these type of openings are being flooded by unqualified JDs that can't find meaningful employment and companies are looking to discourage JDs. This is unfortunate for those who have a JD and could be valuable in these roles.

I'm not looking, but I do commercial/government contracts and look at jobs ads occasionally.

Thoughts?

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fettywap (Feb 5, 2019 - 9:06 pm)

I'm not sure what you're looking at. The job ads I've been looking at for those jobs prefer a JD.

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saltlifesticker (Feb 5, 2019 - 9:19 pm)

No, I agree. Many of them do prefer JDs. But I'm starting to see more that state a preference for non-JD.

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catwoman333 (Feb 6, 2019 - 2:19 am)

"Non-JD" is just another way of saying "low paying job".

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wallypancake (Feb 6, 2019 - 11:03 am)

JD-preferred usually means that they would like a lawyer but will not pay you like a lawyer. These code words do not fool anyone. Just euphemisms.

Child leadership executive=babysitter
Gasoline transfer expert=dude who pumps gas at Exxon
International relocation attorney-sleazy immigration lawyer
Domestic relations litigator-divorce lawyer
Pre-owned transport organizer-used car honk

These JD-preferred jobs may be a good direction to go in, just understand what it is all about.

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catwoman333 (Feb 6, 2019 - 10:41 pm)

My all-time favorites: "Executive Assistant" (gopher or secretary), "Stay-at-home Mom" (unemployed spouse), or "Life Coach" (unemployed slacker).

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beat123 (Feb 7, 2019 - 3:30 am)

What is your thoughts about roles that require you have to JD but make no mention about being licensed to practice law?

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barelylegal (Feb 6, 2019 - 11:30 am)

Completely anecdotal but my company has been filling JD Preffered vacancies with unlicensed JDs. Management got tired of the Attorneys in those spots trying to progress their careers and would rather have people they can dead end and turn into lifers in the Ks department.

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latinforliar (Feb 7, 2019 - 11:05 am)

I am a hiring manager for these sorts of positions at my BigPharma company. We do not post as "JD-Preferred." Only bachelor's required. We still get a lot of JD's applying. I got the job back during the the height of the recession, and now have climbed up to management.

So just to give my take on JD's. I view it as a data point, and consider it equivalent (for this job) to an MBA. The standard job on my team is about 1/3 legal (document review/drafting/negotiation), 1/3 business (profit analysis/pricing), and 1/3 information systems (reporting/business intelligence/data entry and cleaning). So a specialized background in any of those items could be something I consider valuable for my team.

Just some background, because people seem interested in these positions. Salaries are (roughly) Contract Manager - $70k, Sr. Contract Manager - $85k, Contracting Lead - $95k, Management - $140-$160k.

I have had great JD's - who have gone on to be leaders in the organization (moving to regulatory/compliance, data analytics, finance, and even legal). I have had bad JD's - and it usually doesn't have to do with their skills - it has to do with their attitude (I'm better than this job, I should be CEO by now (literally, of a multi-billion dollar company), treating experienced professionals as lesser because they are less educated).

So - is this JD preferred? That is a good question. Yes, but it is also MBA, MSIS, leadership experience, finance experience, IACCM certification, government contracting experience, and stakeholder management experience preferred.

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onehell (Feb 7, 2019 - 1:17 pm)

Every once in awhile, particularly during the height of the recession but still sometimes to this day, I too have seen the occasional "no JDs need apply" type of posting.

It definitely does happen, most likely because they've either had a bad experience with JDs in the past or because they assume a JD will be unhappy and/or demand a higher salary and level of discretion and responsibility than they're willing to offer.

But for the most part, I think this is rare. On average, I've found that the JD is at least a slight positive. Not much of a positive, but if it comes down to two otherwise equally-qualified candidates it may break the tie. The lack of success most JDs experience is not so much the JD itself as it is the fact that they just don't have anything ELSE. Experience always trumps education, in pretty much any sector, and as a practical matter the JD effectively means that you're going to have at least 3 years less experience than anyone of similar age that you're competing with.

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