Remembering TCPaul, 2016-2019

What's the shortest time you spent at a job before leaving?

x-post from TLS. Interested in stories from this community. bingojackson02/20/19
An update (nearly a month later): I started interviewing, fo bingojackson03/19/19
Congrats on the new opportunity; thanks for the update. A wutwutwut03/19/19
1 day. Immigrant/Latin community focused firm with multip superttthero02/20/19
Non-law job, about a month. Law job, a year. It was miserabl tcpaul02/20/19
Lunch time on the first day. tedandlisa12302/20/19
I once worked in the mall carrying a clipboard and asking pe johnsmith02/20/19
5 months. Field legal counsel. Job was actually pretty goo jd4hire02/20/19
2 hours. Started a new job, began the onboarding paperwork, whipster02/20/19
One day. I could tell on the drive home that the commute wa brokelawyer02/20/19
1 day, doc review project, spent most of the day on the phon txattorney02/20/19
An hour or so dingbat02/20/19
Does leaving the same day as the interview (and verbal offer catwoman33302/20/19
Now just think of the wretched people for whom leaving was n brokelawyer02/21/19
IMO, leaving a miserable job is ALWAYS an option. Or, to par catwoman33302/21/19
Is not paying bills also always an option? debtslave1503/19/19
6 months. Small boutique litigation firm founded by a for thedarkscrivener02/21/19
Makes you wonder if the former BigLaw partner-turned-boss wa dupednontraditional02/22/19
Maybe 10 minutes...I interviewed for a law clerk position at mikeisright02/21/19
Should have given it more time; there may have been napping toooldtocare02/21/19
Interesting thread, and some surprising responses. My short wutwutwut02/22/19
Not counting temping, a year for legal jobs. Though three ye doctorseuss03/13/19
In 2008 I was an intern at an energy company, 1/3 of my prio ternarydaemon03/14/19
2 weeks. Worked at a fast food restaurant during high school pam14503/14/19
2 weeks. Worked at a fast food restaurant during high school pam14503/14/19
In college I got a fundraising job one summer. Went in for t midlaw03/14/19
3 weeks. I got the offer from another employer I was hoping fcct03/14/19
I’m going to win this: Half of my 40 minute commute. Wh yankeebirdie03/17/19
I spent three months on the doc review circuit before gettin barelylegal03/19/19
I quit a public defender job 1 week before my start date. Do shitlawsf03/22/19

bingojackson (Feb 20, 2019 - 1:31 pm)

x-post from TLS. Interested in stories from this community.

Reply
bingojackson (Mar 19, 2019 - 2:48 pm)

An update (nearly a month later): I started interviewing, found a great opportunity and decided to take it. My last day at my current gig is next Friday, which coincidentally is exactly 5 months after I started. Oh well, you live and you learn!

Reply
wutwutwut (Mar 19, 2019 - 5:51 pm)

Congrats on the new opportunity; thanks for the update.

Also, you got a pretty interesting thread started.

Reply
superttthero (Feb 20, 2019 - 2:06 pm)

1 day.

Immigrant/Latin community focused firm with multiple offices in Chicago.

My first day consisted of the person I was replacing going through every case she had (70+ cases in tons of different areas) and giving me a status -- which all were chit, and me having lunch with all the secretaries who could not wait to tell me how much was wrong with the place.

Emailed that night that I had another opportunity and didnt go back.

Reply
tcpaul (Feb 20, 2019 - 2:54 pm)

Non-law job, about a month. Law job, a year. It was miserable but I gutted it out until I found a new job.

Reply
tedandlisa123 (Feb 20, 2019 - 3:18 pm)

Lunch time on the first day.

Reply
johnsmith (Feb 20, 2019 - 3:30 pm)

I once worked in the mall carrying a clipboard and asking people to eat potato chips and then answer the phone and tell people what they thought of the chips. No one wanted to eat these chips. I lasted a couple hours.

Reply
jd4hire (Feb 20, 2019 - 4:15 pm)

5 months. Field legal counsel. Job was actually pretty good, but caseload was way too high and I got way too comfortable walking into depositions, court hearings, arbitrations and mediations completely unprepared and having no clue about my case or client.

Reply
whipster (Feb 20, 2019 - 6:46 pm)

2 hours. Started a new job, began the onboarding paperwork, then got the call from the job I really wanted.

Reply
brokelawyer (Feb 20, 2019 - 8:41 pm)

One day. I could tell on the drive home that the commute was going to be total hell.

Reply
txattorney (Feb 20, 2019 - 8:53 pm)

1 day, doc review project, spent most of the day on the phone with clients and left early on the first day to do an attorney bond. Was called by the project manager around 5 pm asking if I left early and I told them yes for a client. They fired my ass and didn't pay me for the day since I was on the phone most the day according to them. I think I did like 40 documents over the course of 5 hours.

Reply
dingbat (Feb 20, 2019 - 10:34 pm)

An hour or so

Reply
catwoman333 (Feb 20, 2019 - 11:09 pm)

Does leaving the same day as the interview (and verbal offer) count?

Right out of college, I interviewed for, and was verbally offered a job on the spot (in a call center). I was desperate for work, really needed the job, and fully intended to stay at least for a few months or year.

But as my new supv. was walking me through the new workspace, introducing me to mgmt., I passed a vast sea of small cubicles, stretching as far as my eye could see. They were filled with the saddest, most depressing, burned-out looking souls I had ever seen. Halfway through the "grand tour" (as my growing panic mushroomed) I politely excused myself to use the restroom on another floor.

I then walked through the door out to the elevator and rode it to the ground level floor, calmly and smilingly handed my access badge to the security guard--then ran like hell on fire as fast as my little feet would carry me out to my car, with my internal voice shouting: "GET THE HELL OUT OF DODGE WHILE THE GOING IS GOOD!!!"

Reply
brokelawyer (Feb 21, 2019 - 2:41 am)

Now just think of the wretched people for whom leaving was not an option.

Reply
catwoman333 (Feb 21, 2019 - 6:19 pm)

IMO, leaving a miserable job is ALWAYS an option. Or, to paraphrase Eleanor Roosevelt: "No one can make you feel [like s..t] without your consent."

It's certainly not easy to leave a miserable job or decline it and hold out for something better but people do it every day. You will certainly NEVER find anything better if you convince yourself you are too powerless to try or don't deserve anything better than misery. And as an added bonus, you can look forward to a future on the shrink's couch, looking back at your life in regret, mentally kicking yourself for not having the courage to bail years ago.

Reply
debtslave15 (Mar 19, 2019 - 1:28 pm)

Is not paying bills also always an option?

Reply
thedarkscrivener (Feb 21, 2019 - 11:17 am)

6 months.

Small boutique litigation firm founded by a former partner at a Biglaw firm who wanted to run it like a Biglaw firm. He was a bully who took pride in the fact that other attorneys hated him. Was told I would probably have to work on Thanksgiving and then was berated for not coming in on a Saturday to work. He said the problem with their last associate was she thought she "only owed them a certain percentage of her time." I refrained from explaining that I did only owe them a certain percentage of my time because I was not in fact an indentured servant. I put out resumes that night, found a new job within a month and walked out without looking back.

Reply
dupednontraditional (Feb 22, 2019 - 7:11 am)

Makes you wonder if the former BigLaw partner-turned-boss was “that awesome” in his former position such that he could start his own firm, or if everyone hated him there also so he said “fine, screw you guys, I’ll start my own firm and show everybody!”

Reply
mikeisright (Feb 21, 2019 - 11:18 am)

Maybe 10 minutes...I interviewed for a law clerk position at this house that was set up as an office...at least the front room where I interviewed was. There was a sign outside and seemed legit. BUT, once you leave the front room, which has desks and office equipment etc, you enter an actual residence. There were family pics in the hallway, beds in the bedrooms with posters on the walls, trophies on shelves, toothbrushes next to the bathroom sink etc. This guy actually expected me to sit at a computer in his kid's bedroom and work. I said I wasn't comfortable and could not work there. He walked me right back out the front door.

Reply
toooldtocare (Feb 21, 2019 - 12:45 pm)

Should have given it more time; there may have been napping privileges included.
For me, shortest legal job was 2 months; left because I had been misled about the salary.

Reply
wutwutwut (Feb 22, 2019 - 4:57 pm)

Interesting thread, and some surprising responses. My shortest job was 4 years - the "part-time" job I had during undergrad.

Reply
doctorseuss (Mar 13, 2019 - 10:13 pm)

Not counting temping, a year for legal jobs. Though three years is my max so far, at my current position.

Reply
ternarydaemon (Mar 14, 2019 - 3:49 am)

In 2008 I was an intern at an energy company, 1/3 of my prior big-law salary. The economy was just beginning to tank, and I began to feel distraught at the "lack of good paying vacancies, and too many low-paying ones".

The company was not a bad place, actually quite cool people, but I was a glorified office boy basically.

One day, I asked my boss for permission to go to an interview for another job position, and I asked it directly to her, in person!

I brought delicious food with me, everyday, and I ate it on my desk until noon. One time, my boss just came to my desk, eyes wide opened, and just took one of my many tupperwares and took it into the kitchenette, as if I was a child. It was the tupper of my papaya.

As the gig collapsed, one Thursday I ate too much ensalada, with many types of greens, pasta, tuna and mushrooms and wheat germ, boiled egg and a couple pieces of broccoli too; which all combined in my stomach and created a holy fart bomb which lasted all afternoon in the cubicles.

It was a very strong fart attack, a mixture of sulphur, methane and garlic. At one point, I just stopped caring and I stood there in my desk, instead of getting to the hall to evacuate the odor, like the last 4 times. I just liberated the pressure and the smell in between everyone.

As I sensed the impending doom, I surreptitiously cleared my desk of personal items before leaving that evening. The following day, a Friday, I did not return to the office, and when they called me I answered that I went to a job interview south of the city, and thus I could not return to office since I was tired.

Rest assured, that was not the last straw.

That Monday, as I woke up, I decided to make a delicious breakfast, and forgot about the work. In my mind, I just resigned.

My boss was a female attorney in his mid-30s, who ran motorcycles during the weekends and used heavy metal buckles under the trouser suit. She called me, mad, again, asking where the hell was I.

Overall, she was a nice boss the first 2 weeks, and I actually made a good job, but I stopped caring, since I was planning a 56 day backpacking trip to Europe!

Anyway, that Monday’s morning, I flatly told my boss that I would “always keep a good memory of my time at the company”, but it was “time that I planned my backpacking trip to Europe”.

She went bananas.

As a multitude of screams, insults, offenses and vituperations came from the phone piece, I began to uncontrollably laugh, and she threatened me with legal action. Which kind of action, I still do not know to this day.

Of course, this could not stand like that, so I drafted a resignation letter, by hand, on a recycled piece of paper from a school notebook, purposely wrote with very, very ugly handwriting. Basically, I rejected all due and fair compensation and severance pay, since my will was above the law, and thus I needed no money from the company.

I asked the guy who washed the cars at my street to “personally deliver my resignation notice”, so I paid him the day and the taxis, and instructed him to specifically ask for my ex-boss.

I never heard from them again.

Reply
pam145 (Mar 14, 2019 - 4:36 pm)

2 weeks. Worked at a fast food restaurant during high school. The hours were 2pm-11pm. Then school from 745 to 2:30pm. And yes they somewhat wanted me to leave school a little early. I told them my family was moving and just quit lol

Reply
pam145 (Mar 14, 2019 - 4:37 pm)

2 weeks. Worked at a fast food restaurant during high school. The hours were 2pm-11pm. Then school from 745 to 2:30pm. And yes they somewhat wanted me to leave school a little early. I told them my family was moving and just quit lol

Reply
midlaw (Mar 14, 2019 - 4:48 pm)

In college I got a fundraising job one summer. Went in for two days, hated it and called in sick on day three. Manager asked me if I was ever coming back, I said no and hung up.

Reply
fcct (Mar 14, 2019 - 11:07 pm)

3 weeks. I got the offer from another employer I was hoping would come through sooner.

Reply
yankeebirdie (Mar 17, 2019 - 4:50 pm)

I’m going to win this: Half of my 40 minute commute.

While on the highway on the way to my first day with a solo matrimonial attorney, I received a call that I got a job as a law clerk in state court (better salary, benefits).

I pulled off the highway and called the attorney - he was PISSED. I then got back on the highway headed home and went back to bed.

Reply
barelylegal (Mar 19, 2019 - 2:41 pm)

I spent three months on the doc review circuit before getting a callback for an in-house position I had interviewed for. Gave notice to the staffing agency and let them know I'd finish out the week but otherwise kept my mouth shut and didn't tell anyone. On the last day the project manager came into my work area and announced my departure. Some people were happy for me, some people were pissed but it was Friday so at least we got free pizza.

Reply
shitlawsf (Mar 22, 2019 - 11:57 pm)

I quit a public defender job 1 week before my start date. Does that count?

Reply
Post a message in this thread