Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

Bribe to get into college scam

http://digg.com/2019/college-cheati ng-bribes-indictment-full toooldtocare03/12/19
remember....only the department or Ed is allowed to pay coll jdcumlaude03/12/19
How is this any different than the centuries-old "tradition" catwoman33303/12/19
Well, it's more creative. With many of the soon to be under toooldtocare03/12/19
truth that this Singer guy has to be given credit for creati williamdrayton03/12/19
There is no “fraud” involved. irishlaw03/12/19
Corruption is legal for real ballers... B listers should hav triplesix03/12/19
Hang on. It indisputably worked for trump and bush. For Cl dingbat03/12/19
The funny thing is the parents paying all this money to get flharfh03/12/19
This...wealthy enough to live comfortably. But not that inte irishlaw03/12/19
life is just so not fair triplesix03/12/19
Well with Loughlin and Mossimo, why not let their girl go to trijocker03/12/19
The FBI went after Singer for tax fraud. He was taking "don trijocker03/12/19
Apparently, the parents tried to deduct the "donations" from toooldtocare03/12/19
I’m curious how the girls’ GPAs look so far. Are they k madathofstra03/12/19
It's hard to flunk out if you pick an easy major. therewillbeblood03/13/19
If you have to spend $6.5 million to get your kid into colle fettywap03/12/19
I believe vast industries in this country are kept alive by wearyattorney03/12/19
You are saying that Trump is not a liar? He lies more than drewprocess03/13/19
Are you old enough to remember Hillary Clinton? cacrimdefense03/14/19
There is another theory for rich kids at elite schools, and onehell03/15/19
Very fair point, except I don’t think it’s the main thru wearyattorney03/15/19
And proving my above screed: https://abovethelaw.com/2019 wearyattorney03/12/19
The point of accreditation is to set minimum standards to th dingbat03/12/19
The pros outweigh the cons. If you have accreditation, the wearyattorney03/12/19
Christ, I bet you’d be able to somehow boil down a blocked alphadog1503/13/19
Liberalism is big government. Big govenremnt is the source o wearyattorney03/13/19
That makes no sense. There's no education mandated by the st therewillbeblood03/13/19
Liberals help the rich in a more effective and covert matter wearyattorney03/13/19
Actually, you could. CA has a bunch of law schools which ar toooldtocare03/13/19
They are considered second class institutions as a matter of wearyattorney03/13/19
Not true. One of the schools here doesn't use Socratic metho fettywap03/13/19
Do they have real lawyers teaching, eg people with more than wearyattorney03/13/19
That's insane. Conservatives hate regulations. Liberals crea therewillbeblood03/13/19
My assertion is that regulatory agencies will be captured by wearyattorney03/13/19
"Amazingly, this scheme sometimes involved Photoshopping the mrlollipop03/13/19
That's a good question; only things I can find related to fu toooldtocare03/13/19
Patron saint of JDU, Paul Campos, said it best: "Isn't bribi therewillbeblood03/13/19
Paying $1.2 million to get into Yale; wow... https://abcn toooldtocare03/13/19
$1.2m is still a lot cheaper than doing it the "honest rich onehell03/14/19
Most surprising thing in this post is that Digg is still aro massivemissive03/13/19
TITCR therewillbeblood03/16/19
https://abcnews.go.com/US/college-a dmissions-real-scandal-pe whiteguyinchina03/18/19

toooldtocare (Mar 12, 2019 - 12:28 pm)

http://digg.com/2019/college-cheating-bribes-indictment-full-text-felicity-huffman

Full House, no less!

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jdcumlaude (Mar 12, 2019 - 2:26 pm)

remember....only the department or Ed is allowed to pay colleges off to lower their standards.

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catwoman333 (Mar 12, 2019 - 2:57 pm)

How is this any different than the centuries-old "tradition" of rich parents giving HUGE donations (ahem...bribes) to the Ivys to get their kids into those schools? It's worked so well for the Trump, Clinton, Bush, Obama families ...God bless those $$-bag "legacy" admissions...:).

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toooldtocare (Mar 12, 2019 - 3:30 pm)

Well, it's more creative. With many of the soon to be undergrads, a sport was chosen which for years hadn't done well, but for whatever reason the coach had pull(examples: Womens Soccer at Yale, Tennis at Georgetown). Instead of buying a dorm for your kid, you pay the coach-directly-many thousands of dollars and your kid suddenly becomes a soccer or tennis star, coach uses his/her clout with admissions(apparently coaches get several spots a year; at GU it was said to three admissions). Kid gets accepted, attends and during first week announces that s/he is no longer interested in tennis/soccer whatever, quits team and enjoys life as an unencumbered(by all those pesky practices/games) undergrad

And it's clearly more economically effective; these schools don't need the cash, but how is the coach going to buy a summer home on Martha's Vineyard without these "donations"?

That was one part of the scam. Other parts included in-test coaching on the SAT/ACT, or even review of the test after completion, with the reviewer helpfully erasing the wrong answers and completing the correct ones. This part of the scam involved getting an MD to sign a letter saying that Junior needed special accommodation for testing, which in this case involved solo test taking supervised by a very helpful proctor.

A lot of thought and energy went into this scam, reflecting that the true American entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well, at least in higher educations. It's not called the Education Industrial Complex for nothing.

And as a side note, the Caplan referenced in the above article is rumored to be a BigLaw partner.

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williamdrayton (Mar 12, 2019 - 5:52 pm)

truth that this Singer guy has to be given credit for creativity and ingenuity. pretty damn elaborate scheme.

I didn't see in any of the news accounts how the feds got tipped off. does anyone have a link on that part of the story? my guess is that Singer stiffed somebody and they got very angry at him.

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irishlaw (Mar 12, 2019 - 3:55 pm)

There is no “fraud” involved.

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triplesix (Mar 12, 2019 - 3:56 pm)

Corruption is legal for real ballers... B listers should have stayed in their lane

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dingbat (Mar 12, 2019 - 6:31 pm)

Hang on. It indisputably worked for trump and bush. For Clinton and Obama it was unnecessary - schools open their doors for such pedigrees

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flharfh (Mar 12, 2019 - 4:32 pm)

The funny thing is the parents paying all this money to get their dumb, lazy kids into schools where they almost certainly wouldn't do well. These are C list hollywood stars, not old money wealth with connections. Credentials only go so far.

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irishlaw (Mar 12, 2019 - 4:57 pm)

This...wealthy enough to live comfortably. But not that intergenerational wealth that stands like a solid stone and can guarantee your decendents a spot at any university for centuries.

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triplesix (Mar 12, 2019 - 5:23 pm)

life is just so not fair

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trijocker (Mar 12, 2019 - 6:23 pm)

Well with Loughlin and Mossimo, why not let their girl go to ASU?
She was already on track with some makeup empire, no need to go rogue getting the girl into USC.

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trijocker (Mar 12, 2019 - 6:01 pm)

The FBI went after Singer for tax fraud.
He was taking "donations" from the rich parents and then quid pro quo they got a deductible donation from his Key Group, and voila, their child was admitted to a pricey college at the same time.
Bet if he had just called himself a college consultant, no one would have investigated.

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toooldtocare (Mar 12, 2019 - 8:18 pm)

Apparently, the parents tried to deduct the "donations" from their taxes, which is what gave the whole scam away. Lots of $$$ claimed to be given to this charity, which started the investigation.

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madathofstra (Mar 12, 2019 - 6:53 pm)

I’m curious how the girls’ GPAs look so far. Are they keeping up or on the verge of getting bounced?

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therewillbeblood (Mar 13, 2019 - 11:10 am)

It's hard to flunk out if you pick an easy major.

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fettywap (Mar 12, 2019 - 7:17 pm)

If you have to spend $6.5 million to get your kid into college, why not just buy the school a building or something? And then you can pay someone to take the SAT for you. People are dumb.

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wearyattorney (Mar 12, 2019 - 7:59 pm)

I believe vast industries in this country are kept alive by rich inheritors trying to establish value that is distinct from the wealth they inherited.

Look at Trump for example. The man was called a rapist, a liar, a traitor, a cheat, a business failure, etc. Nothing got under his skin. The only thing that got under his skin was when Hillary correctly intricate he was born on third, which prompted him to call her a “nasty woman.” The only thing that was true about him, and probably the most benign criticism, was the only thing that pissed him off.

What’s my point? You don’t pay to go to an ivy because the school is going to give you some advantage at life (when talking about these kids), you go to pretend you achieved something. Anything that furthers the pretense, no matter the cost, is worth more than not having it. So if I can bribe to get my kid in through on the DL via an athletics program, that’s preferable than a spectacle being made with a huge donation. This carriers through to the investment bank and law firm and corporate hiring practices. The requirements are what they are so the rich kids can bring in connections, quit after two years, and the middle class kids stay and slave away and become rich when they are 60. The rich kid gets to say he would be rich without help pointing to the middle class kid’s success and the middle class kid has a path to success.

That’s why university degrees at a substantive level are not useful anymore. They teach nothing because they aren’t there to teach, they are there to give you a piece of paper that indicates you are of a certain class or certain raw ability. This is anti-American on a foundational level. If you read De Tocqueville he says one of the reasons America would succeed is because we focus on practical education, not theoretical garbage. We are regressing on that front and it’s massively detrimental. Theoretical education favors the already born rich not just because of corrupt education admissions, but because the kids that get in on merit do not have useful skills and have to work for the rich kids to get real skills. And that’s the only value of the ivies. If you got to an ivy and learn some useless garbage, and are friends with one fo these kids, they can get you a solid job somewhere (where you actually learn useful stuff and become productive). The rich kid gets to say “hey man, I’m not rich because my dads a CEO, look at Danre and Billy Bob, they make 300k a year at my dads hedge fund, I would have made it even if I wasn’t born into money.”

The scam is enforced more insidiously by liberal institutions and policies of course: government needs to shut down any school that doesn’t teach theoretical garbage, the idea that these are the only smart people capable of governing is hammered through the media (Sarah Palin commented on this once), etc.

That’s why fourth tier law schools are garbage. If I open up a law school that scraps the Socratic method, takes you to court on day one and has you litigate real cases in front of a real judge, negotiate and draft real contracts, etc, the ABA will shut me down. So a fourth tier college or law school has to be as useless substantively as Havard. The problem is that the rich kid at Touro whose dad owns fifty ice cream trucks, ten diners, and/or a few buildings in Jersey can’t help you get a job, whereas the rich kid at Harvard whose dad is CEO at hedge fund can and will get it for you (so he or she can say they are successful by virtue of attending Harvard, not because of the trust fund). Incidentally, the reason there’s no solidarity at lower tier schools is for this reason. The poor kids hates the rich kid because he’s a reminder of the con of the system, and the rich kid can’t help him, and the rich kid hates the poor kid because the poor kid is a reminder that he is living a fraud that can’t be concealed.

The problem of course is that the institutions are corrupt and competition has to wipe them out, but big government prevents competition. Mr. or Ms. Trust Fund you go to Harvard and learn Newtonian physics, Latin, and the Socratic method, I’ll go to some scrap school that reaches me how to build an engine from scratch (and why it works, applying theory to practice), where the teachers speak Spanish and Chinese on a provincial level (forcing me to learn it), and where I do 100 trials before I graduate as taught and supervised by Jeffm or some other real lawyer with 30 years experience. Problem is... you can’t have that school because “accreditation.”

Side Note: a friend of mine’s child went to Harvard and he basically said the orientation was something to the effect “the hard part was getting in, dont worry about anything now, and thank your parents because you wouldn’t have gotten in without them [this applies to the middle class kids too because a level of child-parent involvement is absolutely essential to get into a place like that, see eg Obama’s description of his upbringing].” I have no idea if this is true, but I assume it is.

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drewprocess (Mar 13, 2019 - 6:54 am)

You are saying that Trump is not a liar? He lies more than anyone else I can think of.

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cacrimdefense (Mar 14, 2019 - 9:07 pm)

Are you old enough to remember Hillary Clinton?

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onehell (Mar 15, 2019 - 7:59 pm)

There is another theory for rich kids at elite schools, and it goes like this:

People from vast wealth are going to get important leadership roles as a birthright no matter what some admissions committee says, and people with a lot of money can do a lot of damage. So you might as well allow them to obtain the best education possible, in hopes it will broaden their perspectives and make them better at responsibilities they may not deserve, but will get anyway.

This, of course, isn't so applicable to the children of celebrities. Celebs are rich, to be sure, but they aren't necessarily of the sort of wealth that will become a true dynasty. They're all just kinda nouveau riche and their wealth comes solely from services they personally performed, parts they played in movies or songs they wrote or whatever. Not the same as a business that can be passed down generationally.

But when you are talking about Rockefeller style old-money families though, those people are going to control vast wealth no matter what; might as well maximize the odds that they might do something good for the world with it, broaden their perspective, expose them to ideas outside their little bubbles, etc. So relax the admission standards partially in recognition of the fact that the kid who is next in line to run a closely-held but huge family business is going to get that role whether Yale admits him or not.

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wearyattorney (Mar 15, 2019 - 9:58 pm)

Very fair point, except I don’t think it’s the main thrust of things.

Taking this as a singular example, the parents took steps so the kids could believe they did things on their own, they wanted the kids to feel good about themselves.

More importantly though, the substance of the education serves as the best indictment against the system. If you read De Tocquevilles book, he expressly states that one of the biggest reasons the United States would become a superpower is because as a people everyone focused on practical education. While Europeans were engaged in mental masturbation, Americans were concentrating on what works. He dedicates significant analysis to this point.

These schools do not teach anything of value in the real world. The only thing you can do with what you learn is teach other people and/or write books and movies. Even the math and science programs do not teach practical stuff. It’s theory, constant theory, and you cannot object. You have to swallow the theory and hope you learn something useful if you enter industry or teach it to yourself. The degree is nothing more than an entrance credential.

Theoretical garbage is the province of rich people and aristocracy. It’s fun, it’s mentally engaging, and it’s great for conversation. It does not cure diseases, nor does it remedy climate change. If anything, it serves as a vehicle to convince proles to give even more power to trustfundarians.

If you aren’t familar with what I’m talking about, the guy (De Tocqueville) predicted Russia and the United States would control the world in the mid 20th century (he wrote the book in the early 19th century, before Russia was a country).

Side note: He also said the US would become a super power because there was a natural mechanism to prevent wealth accumulation, eg if I am a millionaire farm owner with 13 children, they each get a piece. In two generations the money disperses. Obviously, since the creation of the corporation and central banking, this aspect of our society has changed.

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wearyattorney (Mar 12, 2019 - 8:24 pm)

And proving my above screed:

https://abovethelaw.com/2019/03/willkie-farr-chair-caught-in-college-admissions-scandal/

“So Caplan’s daughter wouldn’t even know the helping hand she got to get into college. As the cooperating witness went on to explain to Caplan...”

All about the rich kiddies feeling good about themselves. Liberalism at it it’s absolute finest.

Let’s get rid of accreditation and open competition amongst schools and we’ll see if this garbage survives.

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dingbat (Mar 12, 2019 - 8:34 pm)

The point of accreditation is to set minimum standards to the quality of the school. That’s necessary because it’s difficult to do due diligence in a school on your own (even if you were inclined to do so)

There are too mamy examples of schools that should have failed far earlier for me to bother with examples.

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wearyattorney (Mar 12, 2019 - 8:53 pm)

The pros outweigh the cons. If you have accreditation, the universities become staffed with people that have no practical experience. They teach theory. They take over the agency responsible with accreditation. Every school now has to be theoretical. The rich go because theory is fun and they don’t have to worry about actually producing. The rich want to say they accomplished something, so now the theoretical garbage becomes a prerequisite for everything. Then you get a calcification where even more
Theoretical garbage, SATs, extracurricular, LSATs, etc all become part of getting into these places. The skills associated with doing these things have no application in the real world except to teach other people to do them. Even more benefit to the rich. Before you are done, you have this absurd situation we are in now.

I know without accreditation we are going to have dudes opening up schools teaching kids that the world is 6000 years old, but you will also have schools open up that teach real practical skills. The poor kids that go there will actually get something out of it and be able to compete and challenge the existing and extraordinarily corrupt hiearchy. The pros outweigh the cons.

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alphadog15 (Mar 13, 2019 - 5:15 am)

Christ, I bet you’d be able to somehow boil down a blocked toilet or a broken mower to politics and “liberalism.”

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wearyattorney (Mar 13, 2019 - 5:54 am)

Liberalism is big government. Big govenremnt is the source of this problem. You can’t have a theoretical education mandated by the state and then complain that rich kids rig it (and that’s just one problem). That’s the only value these schools have: rich kids go there. You think some super smart middle class overachieve learned to do derivatives analysis by studying poetry at Princeton? No. The rich kid network gets him a job at the Ibank so that the falsity of the system can perpetuate. If those kids don’t go those school, those schools have no value because the education there (and everywhere else) is not useful in the real world. It’s merely an indication of raw ability and class.

Why can’t competing methods of instruction come up: accreditation issues.

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therewillbeblood (Mar 13, 2019 - 11:11 am)

That makes no sense. There's no education mandated by the state; plenty of rich kids are so lazy that they skip college.

Rich people using their wealth to give their children unearned advantages is pretty much a core conservative value. How angry do conservatives get over the estate tax, for example?

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wearyattorney (Mar 13, 2019 - 3:19 pm)

Liberals help the rich in a more effective and covert matter in all things.

There’s no education mandated by the state? Do you think I could get accredited as a law school if I opened up a school with 10 real trial attorneys, solos, etc and scrapped the Socratic method entirely? Do you think the ABA staffed with hacks would let that fly? No. The fourth tier crapper has to teach exactly the same way as Harvard, both are useless in substantive terms, but the connections of the latter carry the day.

Now.... does your average Democratic Loser liberal artists with a high IQ and poor phenotype want the system to magically change such that a useless and theoretical education still functions as a pre-requisite for every single position of prominence and this is a “meritocracy”? Sure lol. Said Losers don’t understand whatever value the theoretical education has is because those kids go there and open doors for everyone else.

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toooldtocare (Mar 13, 2019 - 3:26 pm)

Actually, you could. CA has a bunch of law schools which aren't ABA accredited, as does TN and AL. I may have missed some, and some states still let you "read" the law and take the bar. So get your 10 attorneys together and have at it.

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wearyattorney (Mar 13, 2019 - 6:31 pm)

They are considered second class institutions as a matter of law, eg not acknowledged by most states and with additional requirements for entry into the bar.

And they are regulated at the state level such that if you don’t have Socratic BS, you probably won’t even receive the lesser CA accreditation.

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fettywap (Mar 13, 2019 - 6:52 pm)

Not true. One of the schools here doesn't use Socratic method and it's accredited. I think it's 2nd tier.

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wearyattorney (Mar 13, 2019 - 7:28 pm)

Do they have real lawyers teaching, eg people with more than a decade in trial experience, transactional experience, or actually practicing in another capacity?

Replacing Socratic BS with other BS is the same thing.

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therewillbeblood (Mar 13, 2019 - 4:24 pm)

That's insane. Conservatives hate regulations. Liberals created the CSFB, conservatives want to drop it.

Is your assertion that conservatives would more stringently enforce accreditation requirements despite the conservative preference for government noninterference? See how insane that sounds when I put it like that?

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wearyattorney (Mar 13, 2019 - 6:30 pm)

My assertion is that regulatory agencies will be captured by those intended to regulate them, so we are better off without most regulations.

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mrlollipop (Mar 13, 2019 - 5:46 am)

"Amazingly, this scheme sometimes involved Photoshopping the kids' faces onto pictures of athletes to make them look like athletes:"

Seriously? This is going too far. So did they get any kids into any elite colleges by doing this?

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toooldtocare (Mar 13, 2019 - 9:47 am)

That's a good question; only things I can find related to full house's kids at USC. Haven't seen any other names of kids at Yale or Stanford, although the allegations are that is exactly what happened.

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therewillbeblood (Mar 13, 2019 - 11:13 am)

Patron saint of JDU, Paul Campos, said it best: "Isn't bribing somebody to get your kid into USC like bribing the maitre d' at Olive Garden?"

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toooldtocare (Mar 13, 2019 - 11:59 am)

Paying $1.2 million to get into Yale; wow...

https://abcnews.go.com/US/live-updates-actress-lori-loughlin-face-judge-varsity/story?id=61651630

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onehell (Mar 14, 2019 - 4:27 pm)

$1.2m is still a lot cheaper than doing it the "honest rich people way," i.e. donating enough money to create an entire endowment or building. That would cost ten times that, at least. Dunno why schools with $20B endowments even need to bother courting such donors, but they do.

And that, at the end of the day, is the real "crime." They bribed individual employees of the university instead of the university itself for a much higher (but perfectly legal) price.

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massivemissive (Mar 13, 2019 - 3:04 pm)

Most surprising thing in this post is that Digg is still around.

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therewillbeblood (Mar 16, 2019 - 10:17 am)

TITCR

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whiteguyinchina (Mar 18, 2019 - 2:39 am)

https://abcnews.go.com/US/college-admissions-real-scandal-perfectly-legal-analysis/story?id=61638365&cid=clicksource_4380645_1_heads_hero_live_hero_related



this is a nice write up

real scandal is, the elite schools are for the elites!

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