Remembering TCPaul, 2016-2019

SSD attorney bragged to me he took all the best clients from his boss when he left as an associate

Beware who you bring on tttsolo04/04/19
Or alternatively, treat your employees right. Though I ha thirdtierlaw04/05/19
Seems a little odd for SSD. My wife did that for about 6 ye jd4hire04/05/19
SSD is a very tough living for a solo. For every 10 people catwoman33304/05/19
I think if you have an established practice and an in with a thirdtierlaw04/05/19
My guess is that woman had a big pot of $$$ or line of credi catwoman33304/05/19
I am thinking that in 5-10 years, AI will resolve most cases heythere04/06/19
I doubt it - your average claimant will still need help gett dingbat04/06/19
that SSD attorney did the right thing. If you're an associa dingbat04/06/19
tttsolo (Apr 4, 2019 - 7:24 pm)

Beware who you bring on

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thirdtierlaw (Apr 5, 2019 - 7:49 am)

Or alternatively, treat your employees right.

Though I have spoken about changing jobs, namely for a different practice area/more money, I'd never move to a different crim/fam law firm. My bosses treat me great. They are fair, not overly demanding, do not yell, and have given me an environment that allows me to grow. So I have zero desire to try grabbing their best clients and bouncing.

Treating employees well can go a long way to developing loyalty.

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jd4hire (Apr 5, 2019 - 10:15 am)

Seems a little odd for SSD. My wife did that for about 6 years. A lot of her clients had very low cognitive capability and really wouldn't understand the situation.

Also, most SSD is a high volume game. Not so much great clients, but jamming claims through. Of course some are better than others.

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catwoman333 (Apr 5, 2019 - 12:50 pm)

SSD is a very tough living for a solo. For every 10 people you sign as clients, you are lucky to win 2 of those claims. And you have to wait 2+ years for hearings, then another 4-6 months to get paid.

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thirdtierlaw (Apr 5, 2019 - 2:02 pm)

I think if you have an established practice and an in with a pipeline of clients, i.e. represented a factory worker with a lot of work friends, you can do fairly well.

I know one woman who broke off from a PI firm, she was a partner, to just open a sole SSD shop, started with one paralegal and in the past 3 years has hired 2 more and is thinking about bringing in an associate at about $80k.

Though um sure this is like most areas of law, some kill it some starve.

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catwoman333 (Apr 5, 2019 - 3:33 pm)

My guess is that woman had a big pot of $$$ or line of credit from family or a bank when she left that PI firm and while she waited 2-3 yrs. for hearings and decisions for that "pipeline" of SSD clients to sustain her while she built her practice. In reality, few solo SS lawyers start out with those resources.

The problem isn't finding clients or "getting established" (setting up shop, hiring staff). It's the ridiculously long waiting period to get paid on these cases in an exclusive SSD practice and you can safely assume you won't make much $$ or on a consistent basis for 2-3 years.

SSD clients are contingent fee only. They don't pay attys a retainer for services or a fee for filing their claims. And they pay zero for years while their claims are denied twice by the agency and while attys appeal, build their case, request hearings, and wait for hearings and decisions.

Also, the win rate for SS claims has significantly declined in the past few years. It's now 43% nationwide, with some states in the 30% range. So attys can safely assume a high likelihood that they will lose and not get paid in half the cases. No a great return rate on investment.

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heythere (Apr 6, 2019 - 10:34 am)

I am thinking that in 5-10 years, AI will resolve most cases without the need for human interaction except for the claimant inputting the case in his own words and uploading med documents. Hit enter and a wait bar scrolls -- and then the jackpot amount. For a nice touch, additional information can be displayed: "2.1% of decisions have been revised on appeal, 1.9% for a lower amount, 0.2% for a greater amount. Click here to accept."

The legal profession will go out with a wimper.

Be sure to support your LolSkool!

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dingbat (Apr 6, 2019 - 8:09 pm)

I doubt it - your average claimant will still need help getting his/her sh-t together

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dingbat (Apr 6, 2019 - 8:12 pm)

that SSD attorney did the right thing. If you're an associate, make sure your clients know it's you doing the work, not the firm. Many clients think of attorneys as fungible, doesn't matter what associate does the work - make sure they want you to continue to represent them, wherever you go.

That way, if your firm doesn't treat you right, you can leave and take your clients with you.
My goal when I plan on hiring associates (will probably pick one up this summer) is to look for future partners, and my task will be to help them get there.

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