Remembering TCPaul, 2016-2019

Non-Doc Review Contract Roles

I spoke to someone today who works in the "interim legal rec 6figuremistake05/13/19
she was probably referring to recruiting outfits like Bliss williamdrayton05/13/19
Makes sense; thought it's pretty depressing that the best so 6figuremistake05/13/19
if the prevalence of these job postings is any indication, t williamdrayton05/13/19
Short answer - yes. But that's not necessarily a good thing bittersweet05/15/19
6figuremistake (May 13, 2019 - 1:01 pm)

I spoke to someone today who works in the "interim legal recruiting" business. I assumed that was just a euphemism for doc review recruiting. She said, however, that temporary attorney roles have changed a lot in the past decade. According to her, most of her placements (and client requests) pertain to specialized, niche contract attorney roles. Is non-doc review, contract attorney work really on the rise? Could that be what is behind some of the "improvement" in the legal labor sector?

Reply
williamdrayton (May 13, 2019 - 2:13 pm)

she was probably referring to recruiting outfits like Bliss and Hire and Esquire. truth that they specialize in temporary placements for substantive areas of law. if the website postings are any indication, these temp positions have been on the rise in the last 10-15 years.

I guess biglaw started realizing the obvious: why should we have associates sitting around twiddling their thumbs for 8-9 months of the year waiting for the big case/transaction?

instead, when the big case/transaction does come along, we ramp up the personnel and when the case/transaction dies down we say "see ya later, don't let the door hit you in the arse - we'll call the agency if we need you again". Conceptually, it's exactly like doc review.

note of caution: these agencies indicate a STRONG preference for people with biglaw experience in the exact practice area (hit the ground running and get out ASAP)

Reply
6figuremistake (May 13, 2019 - 2:25 pm)

Makes sense; thought it's pretty depressing that the best some people with BigLaw credentials can get is contract work. Moreover, those of us losers without such credentials, can't EVEN get certain (non-doc review) contract work.

The conversation was related to working for such an outfit, but I think they want someone who is more of a salesman. Plus, it would seem like the legal industry equivalent of participating in the slave trade.

Reply
williamdrayton (May 13, 2019 - 4:15 pm)

if the prevalence of these job postings is any indication, there must be a fairly robust labor pool of ex-biglaw folks ready, willing and able to take these gigs.

it would make perfect sense for a mommy-tracker who doesn't want to return to the full-time biglaw grind and set her own schedule.

but I guess it kind of sucks for the young associate who got pushed out prior to that magical 6-7 year mark when they easily slide into cushy corporate in-house or BigFed exit options.

if it's still true that only 2 out of 10 biglaw associates make partner, those other 8 people still have to feed and clothe themselves.

Reply
bittersweet (May 15, 2019 - 4:00 pm)

Short answer - yes. But that's not necessarily a good thing.

Yes, temp attorneys are getting beefier assignments. A lot is still doc review, but they may keep you on the assignment and move to doing doing depo prep, timelines, fact memos, clawbacks, trial exhibits, etc.

It's nice that it's not quite as mindless as doc review. When you get one of these it may pay slightly better (10-20%) over the standard doc review rate). But it's still yet another temp gig and it's stuff that they are not staffing up the associates for. The firms want the former associates, but they will often accept seasoned temp attorneys that have never worked as an associate - if that temp has proven themselves to the agency.

It's nice to have less mindless work, but it is still another temp gig that rarely goes anywhere. But Sallie Mae and your rent can get paid.

Reply
Post a message in this thread