Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

American soldiers who have been in North Korea since the 1960s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yd2 dCk3N8cE One of my fav boredgirl112/27/18
BTW, I once thought about doing something crazy like going i boredgirl112/27/18
Did you say nothing can go wrong then immediately follow tha onefortheteam12/27/18
I will end up rescued and famous. boredgirl112/27/18
I don't think the Syrian criminal justice system is as consi onefortheteam12/27/18
Fascinating. Of course, can't really trust what any of t onehell12/28/18
Tldr; wagec*cking sucks and makes living in a totalitarian r midlaw12/28/18
I also liked when he talked about Juche. I can totally see h boredgirl112/28/18
Anyone silly enough to think of moving to North Korea should shuiz12/28/18
boredgirl1 (Dec 27, 2018 - 8:32 pm)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yd2dCk3N8cE

One of my favorite documentaries.

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boredgirl1 (Dec 27, 2018 - 8:39 pm)

BTW, I once thought about doing something crazy like going into North Korea. Of course, the Otto Warmbier thing scared me out of doing that. The only other option would be for me to go into Syria wearing Atsuko Kudo after getting my makeup and hair done perfectly in Lebanon. I will demand the Syrian army either arrest me or take me to Bashar al Assad. I will ask Assad to be his second wife. Nothing can go wrong. I either become his second wife or go to a Syrian jail for a few months and become a bargaining tool. Worse case scenario, I'm just deported back to Lebanon with nothing to show for the experience. If I am detained or marry Assad, I become famous. I've also dreamed that Assad makes some money with my face on it and dubs me "Queen of the Arabs" as some have dubbed him "King of the Arabs."



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onefortheteam (Dec 27, 2018 - 8:58 pm)

Did you say nothing can go wrong then immediately follow that up with saying you might also end up as a bargaining tool in some third world Syrian prison?

That's a big f*cking problem imho.

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boredgirl1 (Dec 27, 2018 - 9:10 pm)

I will end up rescued and famous.

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onefortheteam (Dec 27, 2018 - 9:18 pm)

I don't think the Syrian criminal justice system is as considerate of your due process rights as you might wish to believe.

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onehell (Dec 28, 2018 - 4:19 pm)

Fascinating.

Of course, can't really trust what any of them say. People who defect FROM DPRK have a huge incentive to tell (potentially exaggerated) horror stories, and people who defect TO the DPRK can wind up in a concentration camp if they don't extol the virtues of the regime.

That said, I am reminded of something you see in the US in people who have become "institutionalized." It's basically a willingness to trade freedom for security. Prison is pretty miserable, but you never will wonder where you will sleep at night or where your next meal is coming from. And these were low-ranking enlisted men at the time of defection. Living under constant orders, unable to even leave base without a pass, and doing exactly as they were told. Would DPRK be that fundamentally different? Would it have been that different if they'd stayed enlisted, or left and had to work an endless succession of low-pay/low-skill jobs where their lives were under the control of some employer. In many respects, a wage slave is still a slave.

It seems that at the very least, if these people did as they were told then they were taken care of. How well they were taken care of is questionable, as is whether they had to do anything really unsavory like Dresnok functioning as a goon beating up his fellow defectors or breeding spies for the regime with his assigned wives.

But I do accept the premise that there wasn't a whole lot for these people back in the US, given how poor they were and how broken their families. And thus, I accept the premise that the freedom the US offers is not always worth a whole lot if you're broke. It's not entirely irrational to give up your freedoms of speech and movement in exchange for someone just giving you three hots and a cot. No worries as long as you do as you're told. No losing jobs or homes or bad credit. The government just tells you what to do and you do it.

Life in the DPRK may or may not be easy, but it probably is simple, and these people all seemed to be of enough value that they would have had it better than the average citizen, again as long as they did as they were told. That decision to defect is not one I see as totally irrational, is the bottom line. I can see where they were coming from.

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midlaw (Dec 28, 2018 - 6:04 pm)

Tldr; wagec*cking sucks and makes living in a totalitarian regime seem tolerable.

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boredgirl1 (Dec 28, 2018 - 8:08 pm)

I also liked when he talked about Juche. I can totally see how one can end up content in the DPRK. I did still feel bad for Dresnok when the other guy left, but he bullied him. I can tell he missed him though and was perhaps a little jealous he left.

It was cool how they starred in the propaganda films. I really wanted to visit there, but I am terrified after Otto Warmbier.

I do like how they call each other "comrade." We need to start calling each other something cool like that in the USA.

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shuiz (Dec 28, 2018 - 8:24 pm)

Anyone silly enough to think of moving to North Korea should try living in South Korea first.

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