Remembering TCPaul, 2016-2019

Early voting increases voter turnout! That's why (R)s hate it and (D)s love it.

https://fivethirtyeight.com/feature s/early-voting-laws-proba wutwutwut01/31/19
Shouldn't voting be convenient? It makes sense to have more frida201/31/19
It probably does increase voter 'fraud' though. From rea superttthero01/31/19
"something softer like a spouse/parent/child just shrugging wutwutwut01/31/19
I had an intern from Ireland who said her parents were votin frida201/31/19
That's a horrible idea anotherjd01/31/19
Why? I'm not asking to argue, just curious. wutwutwut01/31/19
So you tell your aunt to vote for you. Do you have to give anotherjd01/31/19
wutwutwut (Jan 31, 2019 - 3:10 pm)

https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/early-voting-laws-probably-dont-boost-turnout/



Except that it doesn't, actually.


Instead: “doesn’t increase turnout — it just shifts when existing voters cast their ballots.”


Or reduces turnout: a UW-Madison study found that "early voting actually leads to lower turnout — perhaps because the social and campaign-driven pressure to vote is not as focused as it is when voting must all occur on a single day".

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frida2 (Jan 31, 2019 - 3:35 pm)

Shouldn't voting be convenient? It makes sense to have more than one day when you can do it.

It might not boost turnout much but it probably decreases targeted voter suppression. The bad people that don't want you to vote (aka GOP) have a harder time suppressing certain voters when they have more time to vote.

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superttthero (Jan 31, 2019 - 3:42 pm)

It probably does increase voter 'fraud' though.

From real vote selling to something softer like a spouse/parent/child just shrugging and giving their ballot to someone they trust that cares more about the election.

I'm not necessarily against it, like the direct-election compact thing, I think it's proponents though are overpromsing how much it fixes and underselling it's negatives.

And, as to your point about suppression, wasn't there a whole issue with certain districts being denied for silly things like "bad" signatures which primarily targeted certain areas that were more minority-based (or at least that's how I read it).

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wutwutwut (Jan 31, 2019 - 3:52 pm)

"something softer like a spouse/parent/child just shrugging and giving their ballot to someone they trust that cares more about the election"


This happens all the time anyway, but I guess it makes it easier (because the spouse/parent/child doesn't have to go punch the ballot with their SO's suggested picks).


"silly things like "bad" signatures" Yeah. As if poll workers are handwriting match experts? Also where voters would make minor errors like writing down an address that differed from their registration.

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frida2 (Jan 31, 2019 - 4:19 pm)

I had an intern from Ireland who said her parents were voting for her and that was allowed. She said certain relatives could be designated to vote for you, including your parents, if there was written permission. I'm not saying we should do that, but I found that interesting. People delegate important tasks to family members all the time.

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anotherjd (Jan 31, 2019 - 4:28 pm)

That's a horrible idea

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wutwutwut (Jan 31, 2019 - 4:33 pm)

Why? I'm not asking to argue, just curious.

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anotherjd (Jan 31, 2019 - 4:48 pm)

So you tell your aunt to vote for you. Do you have to give specific instructions? Or can she just vote anyway she wants on your behalf because she has good judgment? Is this going to have to be done via a notary? Or something less formal? What if the aunt votes on your behalf but you change your mind and voting is still open? Is it irrevocable?

Just get your lazy butt down to polling place

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