Celebrating 10 years! 2007-2017

GIGS - Essential Forms

Does it look like this? Click on it for a clearer display. jeffm03/15/19
It looks familiar, but I have to confess I never noticed tho guyingorillasuit03/15/19
I was just wondering. We are getting ready to install o jeffm03/15/19
What is the database software atop which this runs? phosita03/16/19
Might as well be Access bigwags03/16/19
If I told you, I'd have to kill you. jeffm03/16/19
666 lucapacioli03/16/19
How is this different than amicus? tttsolo03/16/19
I'm not real familiar with amicus, but a quick look at their jeffm03/16/19
jeffm (Mar 15, 2019 - 9:44 am)

Does it look like this? Click on it for a clearer display.



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guyingorillasuit (Mar 15, 2019 - 6:34 pm)

It looks familiar, but I have to confess I never noticed those tabs at the bottom. Maybe they exist in my version, but I never bothered to look. I don't think anyone really does.

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jeffm (Mar 15, 2019 - 10:13 pm)

I was just wondering.

We are getting ready to install our system on a maintained server to start letting people fiddle around for free to give us some feedback. We will be cloud-based, and the method we came up with to share data from form-to-form is far easier and more sophisticated than EF.

No tabs. Not even "case set-up." You just name a case to create one. You select among your cases to open one and work on it. When you select a case, you are shown all of the documents you have assembled for the case to date. You can re-open them to edit them, or you can peruse the CJC and local templates to add more documents to the case. All you do then is open the documents and start completing them. AS YOU COMPLETE THEM, the data is gathered for use in other forms on a go-forward basis.

This method allows the sharing of A LOT more data, and it doesn't interrupt your natural workflow. For example, family practitioners such as you can SELECT the ad litems. Your ad litem in one case might be opposing counsel in other cases. No problem. Just select him or her to be opposing counsel, ad litem, witness, or whatever combination of roles applies to your forms. We even track property for division upon divorce - bank accounts, real estate, retirement benefits, etc. That way, these items can be shared from form-to-form as well.

We track all of the data for pretty much anyone who might be involved in the case, down to judges, bailiffs, witnesses, process servers, children, etc. We grab almost every bit of data you might enter on a person, including stuff like eye color, weight, tattoos/markings, etc. (which appear on some of your criminal forms). We also track contact and license information for process servers (because this information appears in many of your forms pertaining to service of summons, etc.).

With the method we designed, you can use all kinds of data for ANY people/businesses for ANY role in ANY case. The data just grows as you keep going.

California is smart to use standardized PDF's. They could have been designed with more forethought, but at least they mandate the use of these PDF's. In contrast, Texas is pretty much a free-for-all in terms of drafting one's own pleadings and motions. It's far less efficient for judges here, and I bet we catch up to you before too long.

We haven't mapped 100% of the local forms in CA because there are quite a lot of them. What we are doing is picking the more populous counties and more popular practice areas (e.g., family law) and working our way down the list to smaller markets and practice areas.

Anyway, I'm excited that we're finally to this point and looking forward to seeing it put to actual use. We're going to have to find out what the best ways might be to put the word out to CA attorneys. I am hoping some of you long-time CA members might be able to give us some ideas to help us out.

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phosita (Mar 16, 2019 - 12:12 am)

What is the database software atop which this runs?

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bigwags (Mar 16, 2019 - 7:20 am)

Might as well be Access

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jeffm (Mar 16, 2019 - 9:39 am)

If I told you, I'd have to kill you.

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lucapacioli (Mar 16, 2019 - 7:44 am)

666



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tttsolo (Mar 16, 2019 - 8:23 am)

How is this different than amicus?

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jeffm (Mar 16, 2019 - 9:10 am)

I'm not real familiar with amicus, but a quick look at their site and tutorials seems to show it is completely different. It looks like you create your own templates, such as form letters. You can set up the forms to "put this field here" and "that field there." That's a lot of work, given the thousands of mandatory forms out there.

Second, the merge results in an MS Word or WordPerfect document. Once the document is created, data gathering stops. Going back to what I described above, ours STARTS with a document, and the data is gathered. This makes quite a difference. For example, what if you want to share the defendant's eye color from form-to-form? Is there a field for that in the database? Likely not, but it appears that you can customize your client's record to add such a field. So now, you are busy customizing your own database structure to make it do this.

It's way too much work to do it that way.

Like I said, though, I am not real familiar with amicus. I could have it entirely wrong. I doubt it, though. It seems amicus is more well-suited for law practice management - calendaring, billing, etc.

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